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After bleeding the brakes on my wife's K9 650 yesterday I noticed the brakes were still a little mushy so I tried a suggestion I learned from the Harley forum and it worked great.

1) slowly pump the brake lever, then hold the lever close to the grip and wrap a bungee cord around it holding it tight. Leave it that way over night.

2) next day, slowly unravel bungee cord while releasing brake lever.

2) pump lever and you should have firm brakes.

Apparently, the pressure causes the air bubbles to surface in the master cylinder and problem solved. Try it, it works!
 

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Good tip!
Back Nineteen Hundred and Seventy Four I used to do that the night before dirt bike races to assure firm brakes for the race! :thumbup:
We used cut inner tubes as big rubber bands to hold the brake lever and a wedge for the foot brake. 8)
If it was going to be muddy we would fore go the ritual as sloppy brakes on a sloppy track can be a good thing. :wink:
 

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...and if the condition reoccurs later, you know you have fluid issue or a physical problem with either the hydraulics or the pads, rotors or calipers.

Air should not be forming in the hydraulic system if it's intact and the fluid doesn't have moisture in it.
 

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Glad it worked for you. Not the first time someone has posted about doing it on this board.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LeDude said:
use a vaccum pump to bleed the brakes, it will get all the air out of it... it may take a bottle or two of brake fluid...
LeDude, I read your "brakes" tutorial before bleeding my brakes and bought a MITYVAC and it worked good, but the brakes still felt a little soft after bleeding. Hence, bungee cord. Btw, thanks for all you do!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Buffalo said:
Glad it worked for you. Not the first time someone has posted about doing it on this board.
Hi Craig. My apologies if someone has already posted the bungee cord trick. Maybe the moderator could delete this thread.
 

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Thank you Scootermike, I for one didn't know this.

Cheers,
 

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Scootermikie said:
Buffalo said:
Glad it worked for you. Not the first time someone has posted about doing it on this board.
Hi Craig. My apologies if someone has already posted the bungee cord trick. Maybe the moderator could delete this thread.
No need to delete it, always good to get things back in front of people as folks that have not been on the site for a while may not seen the original post.
 

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Scootermikie said:
LeDude said:
use a vaccum pump to bleed the brakes, it will get all the air out of it... it may take a bottle or two of brake fluid...
LeDude, I read your "brakes" tutorial before bleeding my brakes and bought a MITYVAC and it worked good, but the brakes still felt a little soft after bleeding. Hence, bungee cord. Btw, thanks for all you do!
The My-T-Vac and similar hand vacuum pumps can allow air to leak back into the hydraulics around the bleed nipple threads. These pumps draw fluid and they're convenient but they're not an efficient way to bleed a hydraulic brake system. Hydraulics are designed to operate under pressure, not vacuum. Drawing a vacuum at the end of the nipple also draws air into the system around the nipple's threads. You may be able to address this by packing some thick sticky grease around the nipple after you crack it open, but I'd be concerned about fluid contamination if any of the grease got into the fluid. Teflon tape around the nipple threads may be another option.

I've use a pressurized fluid container and a cap plate over the top of the open master cylinder to force fluid into the system rather than try to vacuum it out. It shouldn't take nearly that much fluid to bleed the air out of a system as small as the Burgman's.

A other-than-rock-solid feel in the brake handle can be a function of quite a number of other factors not related to fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I almost forgot to mention that I bought a pair of these to use at the next bleeding. Also bought a pair for my Fatboy. They were only $7 each. http://www.speedbleeder.com/
 

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Scootermikie said:
I almost forgot to mention that I bought a pair of these to use at the next bleeding. Also bought a pair for my Fatboy. They were only $7 each. http://www.speedbleeder.com/
Burgman's are not listed, for those of us that don't know what Suzuki used the same calipers for different bikes, what model bike did you pick to work with an AN400/AN650?

I use these types of bleeders on most of my cars and trucks. Works very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Dave_J said:
Scootermikie said:
I almost forgot to mention that I bought a pair of these to use at the next bleeding. Also bought a pair for my Fatboy. They were only $7 each. http://www.speedbleeder.com/
Burgman's are not listed, for those of us that don't know what Suzuki used the same calipers for different bikes, what model bike did you pick to work with an AN400/AN650?

I use these types of bleeders on most of my cars and trucks. Works very well.
I forgot the part number. I had to call and talk to someone. I think they are the same as the Boulevard. 1 888 879 7016
 

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The My-T-Vac and similar hand vacuum pumps can allow air to leak back into the hydraulics around the bleed nipple threads. These pumps draw fluid and they're convenient but they're not an efficient way to bleed a hydraulic brake system. Hydraulics are designed to operate under pressure, not vacuum. Drawing a vacuum at the end of the nipple also draws air into the system around the nipple's threads. You may be able to address this by packing some thick sticky grease around the nipple after you crack it open, but I'd be concerned about fluid contamination if any of the grease got into the fluid. Teflon tape around the nipple threads may be another option.

I've use a pressurized fluid container and a cap plate over the top of the open master cylinder to force fluid into the system rather than try to vacuum it out. It shouldn't take nearly that much fluid to bleed the air out of a system as small as the Burgman's.

A other-than-rock-solid feel in the brake handle can be a function of quite a number of other factors not related to fluid.
I've used vacuum pumps for years and have never had a problem with air leaking back into the hydraulics. The bleeders are lower than the reservoirs and fluid doesn't run uphill.
 

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'I've used vacuum pumps for years and have never had a problem with air leaking back into the hydraulics. The bleeders are lower than the reservoirs and fluid doesn't run uphill."
No, but air does, and the FAA disallows the use of vacuum pumps to bleed hydraulic systems specifically because they allow air to remain in or be returned to the system during use.

You may, of course, do as you please.
 

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I use a heavy rubber band to hold the brake lever. All it needed was a few hrs., and all was good. No need for the pump, or other paraphernalia .
 

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Details, details, please! It drives me batty when they get left out.

1) Say my brakes are currently bled (good fluid) and they feel a little mushy. Nothing dangerous. Can I tie back the levers and just leave it overnight? Or do I need to take the MC lids off first?

2) How about replacing old fluid with new? Remove MC lid, open bleeder bolt, drain system, close bleeder bolt, start adding new fluid while pumping the lever until it begins to overflow, tie back the lever overnight, then replace the MC lid. Is that correct?

I currently change the brake fluid with a cheap-o vac conventionally. I like the idea of a lazy technique--if it works properly. It would certainly encourage me to do the brakes more often.
 

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A large DOT4 bottle will me more than adequate to suck thru the brake lines several times. The vacuum pump is all that is needed to remove air bubbles from the line.

Also, never EVER shake up a bottle of brake fluid thinking you have to mix it around like paint or whatever. THAT will infuse enough small bubbles in the fluid to give you the symptoms that are described. Even if I knock the bottle off the table and it bounces off the floor I will NOT use it until it's settled overnight.


LeDude said:
use a vaccum pump to bleed the brakes, it will get all the air out of it... it may take a bottle or two of brake fluid...
 

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QuantumRift said:
Also, never EVER shake up a bottle of brake fluid thinking you have to mix it around like paint or whatever. THAT will infuse enough small bubbles in the fluid to give you the symptoms that are described. Even if I knock the bottle off the table and it bounces off the floor I will NOT use it until it's settled overnight.
+1
 
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