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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a flat rear tire. Ready to leave for work this morning and noticed a squirming rear end. FLAT TIRE! There's a small nail in the center of the tire and I really can't remember ever having a flat tire with a tubless tire ever. So the question for all is...how do I go about repairing this? I guess I should be able to repair it and then use it if it's repaired right. What is the best repair. Thanks
 

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You can plug it yourself with a plug kit, or have it professionally done. Some folks are comfortable with riding on a plugged tire - some aren't.

If the tire is half used up or more, I'd personally replace it. If it is fairly new, I might try the plug to get some more use out of it, but I probably would not wear it down as far as I would an unplugged tire. Not saying I am right - but that is probably how I'd handle it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Plug or not to plug? Should I remove the tire from the rim to plug it properly? The tire has lots of life left (7,500 kms) and I would like to get more mileage out of it but I have never plugged a tire. Do you do it from the outside or does the tire have to be removed. Thanks
 

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I don't know if this is a stupid idea or not, but after patching would it be a good idea to put in some of that Fix-a-Flat stuff for a little extra insurance? Or is that a bad idea for motorcycle wheels?
 

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For what it's worth. Here are the results of a poll we did here


What do you do with a flat/after on the spot repairs

Just keep riding it till it's time to change 14% [ 3 ]

Get a new tire installed ASAP 47% [ 10 ]

Have it examined / repaired by a professional 38% [ 8 ]

Total Votes : 21
 

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pauljo said:
You can plug it yourself with a plug kit, or have it professionally done. Some folks are comfortable with riding on a plugged tire - some aren't.

If the tire is half used up or more, I'd personally replace it. If it is fairly new, I might try the plug to get some more use out of it, but I probably would not wear it down as far as I would an unplugged tire. Not saying I am right - but that is probably how I'd handle it.
I would do the same since the hole is in the center of the tire and not close the the sidewall. However, I would have the tire patched from the inside.
 

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I would repair the tire and promptly order a replacement. Keep on riding it knowing that a replacement sits in the garage. Any signs of problems with the patched up tire, replace it.
 

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I agree with alwalk, repair it as you see fit. I have tried plugs on cars with great success, but I don't know about a motorcycle tire. But I figure if the plug gives way, it won't "explode" but would give you plenty of warning that it failled. In this way, I don't see it as a safety issue.
 

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Expect to pay a pretty penny to have it patched. A front tire would probably cost at least $40 & the rear even more. You can cut that way down if you are able to remove the tire from the bike & take just the
wheel in.
 

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pauljo said:
If the tire is half used up or more, ...
Is there a rule of thumb, or legal limit, on how much tread is considered "used up"? I measure my truck tires regularly, and plan on replacing them when they get to about 3/32" or so - my scooter tires are a different animal, though - anybody have any ideas on how much tread sholud be there for safety?
 

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There is one problem with the "fix-it-your-self" plugs, if your not careful (since you have to make the hole bigger for the plug) you could damage the steel belts. It is not hard to cut a few while digging the tool in the hole.
Not that much of a problem on bias ply.
If I am going to go through all that expense to repair a tire (cost as much or more then mounting a new tire) I will just use a can of automotive "fix-a-flat" to get me home or to the dealer.
 

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Alan_Hepburn said:
Is there a rule of thumb, or legal limit, on how much tread is considered "used up"? I measure my truck tires regularly, and plan on replacing them when they get to about 3/32" or so - my scooter tires are a different animal, though - anybody have any ideas on how much tread sholud be there for safety?
The tires all have "wear bars". When the tread gets shallow enough so that the wear bar is even with the tire surface it is time to replace. I personally don't wear mine quite that thin.

With the front tire, it will often have tread distortion (cupping or chopping) before you get down to the wear bars. This can affect handling. When I feel the front tire starting to act up I look at the tread. If the tread is severely cupped (or chopped) - the tire gets replaced. Which flavor of tread distortion you get depends on the type of roads you ride on. The flat cement roads where I live now produce chopping. The slightly crowned asphalt roads in New England produced cupping.

Rear tires tend to flatten out in the middle (which also can affect handling). The Bridgestones do this worse than the Pirellis - but all motorcycle rears tire do it.

So it is not just tread depth - it is the surface condition of the tread as well that influences my decision to change a tire. Generally I get pretty close to the wear bars on the rear tire. Usually I replace the front tire before getting to the wear bars because the tread surface has become unsatisfactory.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OK then,

I just bought a bias tire repair kit ($3.95) that requires me to remove the tire. This is a best way to do it and as much as I would like the convenience of a "plug" I need the peace of mind to do it right. All the K-tire, Canadian Tire and others require you remove the tire and do the repair from the inside so this is what I'm going to do.

As much as I would like the convenience of the plug and the kit recommended by Rubble is a fantastic thing to have on the open road, I would feel better if I did it this way. I will hunt down this plug kit as I have seen them demonstrated at bike shows and nothing better to have when this happens on a trip. (BTW it happened on the 400). Thanks for all the advice guys much appreciated...
 

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I'd order my next tire now.

Patching it from the inside is much better than plugging from the outside.

Replace the tire sooner than you would normally. The stresses on the carcass increase as the tread goes down - that's why they wear faster when they get down a bit. The carcass flexes more, heats up more, the chances of the patch failing go up...

If the hole is in a tread valley rather than in a tread block - then I'd ride with it patched, but replace it as soon as the replacement comes in. If I get a hole in a sidewall then I'll only ride slowly home or to a shop with a plug - and replace the tire immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Flat tire fixed....removed the muffler, removed the muffler holding plate (three 14 mm sized bolts ...must have some locktight on this because its a very fine thread and tough getting out all the way until just about out), removed the wheel (three 17 mm nuts) and then broke the bead. Only had to open one end of the tire. No need to totally remove the tire for full access to the inside for a repair. Patched inside with a "bias" tire repair type kit (radial tire type kits are available as well...must be the type of glue used or something?).

You need a good set of tire irons (16" long tempered metal with curved ends ) . Not those flimsey type found with bicycles or butter knives. Breaking the bead is probably the toughest part of it. Once this is done, its just muscle and will power. Those without patience need not attempt. You probably could use some rim protectors but I tried and they just get in the way. Besides the rims even if I place a cosmetic nick here and there, nobody will see them on this scooter unless youwant to. Thanks everyone for the advice. I will think of buying a replacement. :wink:
 
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