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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As snow, cold and weekly business travel conspire to keep me off the Burgman for the winter, I've began concocting a long-distance ride for warmer times ahead. I'm planning on riding up to James Bay in Quebec just to see the place.

The main concern I have is the desolate ~300 mi. stretch of road between gas stations, where mobile service is non-existent and road traffic is supposedly light.

I've never blown an MC tire, so I have no idea where to start, or what tools I need to effect a fix, assuming no available assistance. Does the tire need to be removed, or can patching be done from the outside?

A primer on patching a tubeless tire for the uninitiated would be greatly appreciated, along with patch kit and compressor recommendations (I'm planning on a 12V compressor, if anyone has had particular luck or lack thereof with one of them, please let me know).

Thanks, and stay warm!
 

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LOL I just came back from the motorcycle show and inside that magazine they have an article called " A Stupid Ride". It's what the author refered to him and his buddys crazy ride up to James Bay from Toronto. You better make arrangements to carry extra fuel as there is a 381 km gap between service stations.

Let me know when you're going and I may ride part way with you.
 

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Well if you are carrying the extra fuel and a 12v compressor you have 3 options:

1. Preventative: Slime There is some controversy over this product but some folks swear by it. Tyre fitters and manufacturers hate it! You will have similar products on your side of t'pond.

2. Temp Repair: Kit I carry this but fortunately have never had to use it - it is a get you to the next tyre place and you need to proceed with caution. However replacement tyres can be very hard to find (A good strategy would be to have one at home that can be transported to you while you try and drinking the next town dry!!

3. The Boy Scout Method or Allwalk's - I hate walking strategy!

I reckon method 2 is most practical. :D

Edit - one more thing if you are serious about being able to help yourself you should practice removing the wheels in the comfort of your garage - you learn at leisure and sort out what tools you really must have with you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Allwalk,

I'll bring the gas if you'll bring the tyres (as shown in the post from NormanB)! :lol: I'll let you know my route when the time comes (probably in late June or early July). I'm heading north from southern CT so I'll be going through Montreal and then further north. There's good info on the web about the James Bay road, so I'm aware of the gas requirements and will be bringing tent, stove, etc. I've done a fair amount of backpacking so I'm not too worried about that component of the trip.

In all seriousness, how does one go about repairing a tubeless tyre with a kit? I have repaired and replaced many a bicycle tyre, in rain, in vain and on the plain (not yet in Spain), so in my mind, 2 wheels=tubes. Do you have to break the bead and do things to the inside of the tyre, or do you apply a patch of some kind like an old rubber raft?
 

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I went to a car parts store and bought a plugger repair kit. About $3.00

I then went to a discount store and bought a $5.00 compressor. I removed the plastic case making it quite small. I put on an electrical end that plugs into the lead for my battery tender.

I hope to never use it.
 

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Tire Repair

This actualy works I speek from experince. Purchaced a tubeless tire repair kit from an automotive supply store make sure it is for radial tires there is a difference. Next stop some but few motorcycle shops have a kit that uses co2 cartriges to reinflate the tire. You can also try bicycle shops they are a popular item. Make sure to have at least 4 cartriges to reinflate a tire back up a cheep pencil type gauge is also a good idea. Stay away from Slime it causes a balance problem.
 

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Tire repair kit works, just ask Johnny Death. We used my kit to plug tire and Johnny used his air pump to fill this past summer up Perkins drive Bear Mountain.
 

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I have used slime in several of my bikes, no problems with balance, all you do is pull the nail out and adjust the tyre pressure and when you get chance have the tyre repaired properly. Ride magazine ran a test on several different emergency repairs and slime came out at the top, they even punctured a tyre in several different places and monitered the tyre pressure on a test run, it maintaind it's pressure like a normal tyre.
If you use a plug kit you run the risk of damage to the cords within the tyre when you ream out the hole for the plug and plugs have been known to throw out.
I have always removed the tyre and cleaned out the slime before having the tyre repaired without any trouble.

Cheers
Ian :D
 

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Problem I have had with slime is it gums up the valve stem so that you can't get air in or check the tire pressure. I do carry a can to use AFTER I get a flat. Be sure to have something to get the valve stem out so you can get the gunk in. I plan to both plug the hole AND use the gunk then get the tire properly repaired as soon as possible.
Is there any possibility of running down the battery by using a pump to inflate the tire?
 

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gruntled said:
Is there any possibility of running down the battery by using a pump to inflate the tire?
Not if you have the engine running while using it.

I'd think that a possible problem with using Slime is that you might pick up a punture and not even realise it?
 

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pauljo said:
gruntled said:
Is there any possibility of running down the battery by using a pump to inflate the tire?
Not if you have the engine running while using it.

I'd think that a possible problem with using Slime is that you might pick up a punture and not even realise it?
....and that is exactly the tyre manufacturers view - that you could pick up puncture(s) that compromised the structural integrity of the tyre and while the slime will mask the problem by retaining the air, the tyre could at some future happening 'let go big style' when you load it (knee down at 80 type of stuff) and then be the primary cause of an 'offy' - mind you they would say that wouldn't they! :wink:
 

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burg650 said:
Tire repair kit works, just ask Johnny Death. We used my kit to plug tire and Johnny used his air pump to fill this past summer up Perkins drive Bear Mountain.
In fact we helped out folks on Bear Mt twice this summer. First up was a big Harley with a flat. Roger patched it and I filled it. They were stuned first by the fact we had trunks on our bikes that could hold patch kits and compressors, then when I pluged the compressor into my Burgy...

We also filled a tire on a little Kymco scooter a few weeks later.
 

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One of my vehicles is a Chevy K3500 4x4; no joy to jack up and change a tire on, I can assure you. Because if this I've always carried cans of "Fix-a-Flat". The one time I needed it (for someone else's car, though) the stuff worked great, perfectly sealing the puncture for at least several days. I presume the can is full of something like "Slime" and compressed gas.

It's been my plan to carry a can of this stuff on long trips in case of tire problems. Any comments, positive or negative?
 

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My take on fixing a flat...

Well, since I am an A+ type personality I plan to tow a trailer with at least 4 extra tires, 2 rims, jack stands, an air compressor, safety flares, first aid kit, exposure blanket, flashlight, extra fuses, tools, duct tape, super glue, change of clothes, gallon jugs of water...hmmm am I missing anything? Oh, and this is just so I can make it back and forth to work...

:D
 

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Don't you do a regular check for nails ?
All these methods are only to get you home where you can get the tyre fixed properly.

Ian :)
 

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Lapine Rider said:
One of my vehicles is a Chevy K3500 4x4; no joy to jack up and change a tire on, I can assure you. Because if this I've always carried cans of "Fix-a-Flat". The one time I needed it (for someone else's car, though) the stuff worked great, perfectly sealing the puncture for at least several days. I presume the can is full of something like "Slime" and compressed gas.

It's been my plan to carry a can of this stuff on long trips in case of tire problems. Any comments, positive or negative?
Hi LR - I would say its OK - it gets you out of danger and inconvenience. Much safer to be moving along in my opinion. However I do think you have to exercise caution in terms of how you ride the bike in terms of speed and cornering. I would use it as get you home or if that was over 100 miles a repair station. Even then, regular stops and pressure checks you could probably risk a whole lot further.
 

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ted clement said:
I carry one of these gadgets with the "mushroom" plugs. Haven't used it on the scoot, but has worked well on my Toyota Corolla for several K miles now.

http://www.stopngo.com/plugger.htm
Link not working, for me anyway. (Firefox browser)
 
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