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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody, I have a 2004 Burgman AN400.

I am replacing the Fixed Drive Face because some of the fins are broken off for reasons unknown. On page 3-74 the Shop Manual shows how to reassemble the Moveable Drive Face Assembly.

I bought a new Fixed Drive Face but I have a few questions:

1) Is the Fixed Drive Face nut left hand or right hand?

2) On page 3-74 the Shop Manual says “With the crankshaft locked, tighten the fixed drive face nut to the specified torque. How are you supposed to lock the crankshaft?

3) On page 3-73 the Shop Manual shows a Rotor Holder tool for locking the clutch housing. If I put the bike on the side stand and use the Rotor Holder tool 09930-40113 then the crankshaft would locked through the belt-clutch-wheel. Is this the intended way to lock the crankshaft?

I really need your help here please, you guys are the greatest!
 

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Some guesses 1) do not know, 2) see #3, 3) yes. Unless some people on this site know (maybe prior Helix and Reflex owners), I would suggest trying the Yahoo Reflex and Helix sites. I think they even have some info on how to make the tool tool need. Good Luck and let us know how it turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks very much! I'll try the Yahoo Reflex and Helix sites. It would be cool if they have info on how to make the tool. I'll let you know how it turns out and hopefully someone here can chime in too. I assume you mean the Yahoo groups or do you mean actual Yahoo websites?
 

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Most use an air powered (or electric) wrench for this work - I believe it is a normal right hand (clockwise to tighten thread). Otherwise there is a special tool for 'locking'.

Sounds as though the last belt change didn't go too well for someone!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello NormanB!

I was thinking of picking up an air impact wrench, if you figure it will work so that I would then simply be able to hold the Fixed Drive Face from turning?

It still does not exactly solve how I can use a torque wrench when putting on the new Fixed Drive Face, as it requires a pretty hefty torque spec, so how does one set up for tightening?

It was not a belt change that didn't go too well, I am replacing the Fixed Drive Face because some of the fins are broken off for unknown reasons. I noticed this when I was doing the 1000 kilometer service.

Thanks ever so much for your thoughtful and fast reply and I very much look forward to your response to the above two questions :)
 

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Are these pictures any good/ or of help? Linky

The air or electric wrench should have an adustable torque setting - you are looking to achieve 105NM (15Kgf-m), the dynamics of this situation should allow you to torque up without the locking tool. However, if you are not happy the there is a suzuki special tool 099920-53740 OR just knock something up in your shop! This picture of the above series (and the comment) may be of specific help Vane nibs
 

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Your fixed plate is not that easy to turn. you should not have a problem.
Take a close look at your bearing on the transmission. My plate also had a few broken "fins" only I did not see it and the grit destroyed the bearings
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NormanB
The pictures are absolutely great and I am in your debt! It looks like I could use a 24 mm offset box wrench and an oversize adjustable wrench to loosen the Fixed Drive Face nut or as suggested an adjustable torque air impact wrench for both removal and installation.

Randy
Thanks ever so much for the tip on the transmission bearing being destroyed by broken fin grit and the confirmation that an adjustable torque air impact wrench can easily be used for both removal and installation.

Really both you guys are life savers :)

I actually have one unrelated question. I had to order a new Cylinder Head Cover Gasket as when I reinstalled the old one there seemed to be a tiny gap near the reed valve cover area and oil dripped out. It is my understanding that most everyone else has managed to reuse their gasket when setting the valves. I confirmed that the gasket seats well in the head cover groove, is not twisted, damaged, looks nice and pliable and everything is super clean. I even put some "Permatex Hylomar HPF Gasket Dressing and Flange Sealant" to aid sealing, but it seemed like the tiny gap was still there, so I did not reassemble the engine to test, preferring to wait for the new gasket.

Without having the new gasket this is speculative, but it almost seems like something is stopping the valve cover from sitting flush with the mating surface of cylinder head face.

Thanks again,
Chum
 

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Chumly said:
NormanB
snipped
I actually have one unrelated question. I had to order a new Cylinder Head Cover Gasket as when I reinstalled the old one there seemed to be a tiny gap near the reed valve cover area and oil dripped out. It is my understanding that most everyone else has managed to reuse their gasket when setting the valves. I confirmed that the gasket seats well in the head cover groove, is not twisted, damaged, looks nice and pliable and everything is super clean. I even put some "Permatex Hylomar HPF Gasket Dressing and Flange Sealant" to aid sealing, but it seemed like the tiny gap was still there, so I did not reassemble the engine to test, preferring to wait for the new gasket.

Without having the new gasket this is speculative, but it almost seems like something is stopping the valve cover from sitting flush with the mating surface of cylinder head face.

Thanks again,
Chum
So what was the question - I do not see a question mark! :wink:

Well I have never used jointing compound at all and have had zero problems.

I believe you installed the gasket incorrectly - start again and do not use jointing compound.! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am 99.99% sure the gasket is installed correctly. There is really only one way to fit it as either rotating it or flipping it does not even come close.

The questions would be what could cause the leak and has anyone had to replace the gasket due to similar conditions? Again I believe you can actually see a tiny space near the reed valve area, but it’s hard to be 100% sure. Could there be something stopping the valve cover from sitting flush with the mating surface of cylinder head face? I can't imagine what, unless the cover got warped somehow?

You suggest not to use Permatex Hylomar HPF Gasket Dressing and Flange Sealant, how come? I have been told that it’s a superlative product for this application http://www.permatex.com/heavy_duty/Chas ... m_no=25249
 

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Chumly,
Don't think it's a matter of a good or bad product, I would say more like "each his own" :lol:
If you even think you can see a gap, I would check the cover to see if it's warped, also look for any dirt or grit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I cleaned all mating surfaces, they were spotless. I used Hylomar because I had not received my new gasket and there was an oil leak, not because I have any affinity for the stuff, all things being equal. I will give it a thumbs up for doing what it promises, with no ill effects.

I have not checked the cover for warping, I need to get it on a nice machined flat surface. Thanks very much for the insights, it's appreciated!
 

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Hi Chumly

First of all - I was not disrespecting you or your favoured jointing compound.

These things are difficult to diagnose from remote and as the military would say - you are the man on the ground make the decision!

As you say, you are certain the joint is fitted correctly so it may be it has distorted/stretched on removal. The manual states 'MAKE SURE TO REPLACE THE GASKET WITH A NEW ONE' but then they would say that wouldn't they? Its your money and their profit! :lol:

Maybe I was lucky - same gasket and no sealant compound (which the Suzuki service manual says should be used) and I got away with it. Maybe next time I will not.

In the meantime you have a new one coming your way - I am sure this will resolve your problem. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have tons of respect for your expertise. I did not know the Suzuki service manual recommends sealant compound. I am hoping/expecting the gasket has distorted/stretched on removal. Cheers :profileright:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Help,

It's the weirdest thing! Everything worked out really well with replacing the Fixed Drive Face, but as I mentioned, I have not been able to get the Cylinder Head Cover to seal well, even though I have now replaced the gasket with a new one.

There appears to be a very, very small gap near and below the reed valve cover area (but nothing to do with reed valve cover per se). I assure you everything is spotlessly, surgically clean. The Hylomar did not rectify the problem so I completely removed all traces "in the interests of science".

I am going to get some shim type washers to place under the large hex head valve cover screw on the left side to allow a bit more travel and hence torque on that side. I can see the two smaller hex head screws supplying lots of torque and compression to the gasket on the right side, but the large hex head screw on the left side bottoms out before there is much compression at all supplied to the gasket on the lower left side near the reed valve cover.

I tested to valve cover on a flat surface, it seems true. Also when the Hylomar was in place (with either the new or old gasket) the leaky area near the Reed Valve Cover did not have any Hylomar stuck to the cylinder head face, thus indicating (to me at least) it was not touching at that point.

Any thoughts, I am stumped!

Cheers,
Chum
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This will give you all a big chuckle!

I cleaned everything off really well, put a thin film of hylomar in the groove of the Valve Cover face, installed the gasket, put RTV on the exposed rubber face, and installed the Valve Cover. I then put two very thin shims under the large hex head valve cover screw to allow a bit more torque on the left lower side because as I mentioned that is where the tiny gap was. The hex head valve cover screws have a "shoulder" so if you shim up the screw it will increase the torque to the gasket.

I followed to Permatex instructions faithfully and 24 hours later I started the engine. There appeared to be no leak anymore and everything sounded really great. But as soon as the motor warmed up there was a bit of oil smoke coming from the exhaust header, so I thought I would add one more shim to the large hex head valve cover screw to compress the suspect area a bit more.

Upon removing the hex head screw I dropped one of the shims, while retrieving the shim I discovered a large thick plastic shim in the belly pan. It's obvious it popped off the big hex head screw when I first removed it some time ago! I put it on instead of the two thinner shims and the leak completely stopped! I pulled off the Valve Cover, removed all the RTV and Hylomar, installed a cleaned gasket and reassembled. All is well!
 

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Awesome Chumly! :D

I was thinking maybe the assembly was 'holding' out the cover but that (either way) something was not right. I did not post on this as I didn't have any experience with Burgman maintenance. Just this weekend I tried to get to the air filter drain tube (I decided I could have yanked it off with hand thru inspection hole but not replace it) and took off most of the rear tupperware and managed to snap off two of the 'hooks' from the lower rear shroud. Upon removal (if busting a part could be considered removing it) I noted the 'pull back to remove or pull out wallet' indicators on the inside of the shroud. I really should RTFSM. :oops:
My automotive experience didn't cover tupperware, maybe I should have taken home-ec/kitchen duty? :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That is too funny about the "pull back to remove or pull out wallet indicators". I just bought a simple 1980 Kawasaki KZ440 Ltd. for my wife to ride so that the Burg stays in better shape while she improves her skills. It’s so nice just walk over and wrench on it without Tupperware. Admittedly the old beast has a few minor issues left to address such as leaky float bowls, and I'm replacing the points/condenser, but still, it’s all right there.

I understand but have not personally confirmed that the Yamaha Majesty has better access to the engine. But I can say it’s pretty obvious that a lot of new bikes are not designed for thoughtful simple access.
 

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Ahhh the delights of tupperware oragami!

But you know after a couple of times to figure out the subtle nuances - you develop the skill and confidence to get the bike naked in half an hour or so. It really is that easy.

Doesn't stop you have a couple of fasteners left over each time tho'! :lol:
 
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