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Discussion Starter #1
I've been messing with a mini lathe for a bit (learning how to use the bugger) planning on making parts for the scooter and other things, so my first project was to replace the god awe full spacers that Givi supplied with the top case base plate that were prone to rust and way too short for my liking. I decided to use one of the most difficult metals to machine 316 stainless steel, I'll let the pics tell the rest of the story but I am darn proud of my first real metal project.

The spacers supplied by Givi



My creation



Side by side


On the Bike




Now there is acceptable space between the base plate and the plastic, before there was less space than the thickness of a dime. I made the 2 smaller spacers 5mm bigger and the larger spacer 4mm bigger hoping to raise the back of the case a tad to keep the top open, it seems to work on level ground. LOL


 

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**** nice :)

I am currently a manual lathe machinist, (an 18" with a 20' bed). Did you drill the holes and ream to final size, or drill in the rgh. and bore to final size?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I drilled the holes using cobalt bits on the lathe starting with a center bit in the tail stock then the smaller cobalt bits stepping up the size in small increments until I got to the desired size (Used lots of viper venom as well). I reamed the edges using a carbide turning tool at a 45 to the edges to break them down. I have to tell you handling that stainless swaff is like playing with razor blades.
 

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I have to tell you handling that stainless swaff is like playing with razor blades.
Yup, I told our high school apprentice, one of the first things he should get in his toolbox is a fine tweezers.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Jim maybe you can help, how can I protect the work piece from getting marred by the chuck? Thanks
 

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I served a full five year apprenticeship as a machinist. They teach kids to do it in six months now, we must have been extra ordinarily thick.

Material selection is an art and you did pick a difficult material to learn with but hopefully you have learned a lot by doing so.

I would have used aluminium.;)
 

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You must have hard jaws, (standard on most lathes). 2 Options

1- Try to gets a set of soft jaws for the chuck

2- Soft metal metal of copper or brass between the jaws and the work. I've used strips copper from old burned out fuses (the real old ones) 200 amp or so. They have copper tabs on the ends about 1/32"-1/16" thick x 3/4-1" wide x 1 1/2" long. Or just buy new shim stock (but I'm cheap) I use them when I have to chuck on a threaded pc., as not to damage the threads.
 

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I served a full five year apprenticeship as a machinist. They teach kids to do it in six months now, we must have been extra ordinarily thick.
Well we had to learn basics, like the feel of the machine, reading vernier, and math. Newer machines like CNC's have less Intimacy ( operator involvement). Now if the machine doesn't have a computer hanging on it to do the thinking, they are lost.

Our equipment is very old, and ea. has it's own personality, but still works well. I guess I fit with the others there:D
I hate digital, and are using "Old School" tools. They don't need a freaking battery:mad:, and they last for decades:cool:.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You must have hard jaws, (standard on most lathes). 2 Options

1- Try to gets a set of soft jaws for the chuck

2- Soft metal metal of copper or brass between the jaws and the work. I've used strips copper from old burned out fuses (the real old ones) 200 amp or so. They have copper tabs on the ends about 1/32"-1/16" thick x 3/4-1" wide x 1 1/2" long. Or just buy new shim stock (but I'm cheap) I use them when I have to chuck on a threaded pc., as not to damage the threads.
Thanks for the help/info Jim.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I served a full five year apprenticeship as a machinist. They teach kids to do it in six months now, we must have been extra ordinarily thick.

Material selection is an art and you did pick a difficult material to learn with but hopefully you have learned a lot by doing so.

I would have used aluminium.;)
Aluminum is nice and too easy to work that is why I went with stainless plus it's much better against the elements and I like a good challenge. What's the saying, nothing ventured nothing gained?

I've only been using the lathe for about 1 month and am learning an extraordinary amount about this craft and I did learn quite a bit about working with Stainless, it really isn't as difficult to work with as people lead one to believe.
 

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I have a genuine Suzuki baseplate 990D0-10G00-060 but misplaced the spacers, would it be possible for you to give me the length of the 3 spacers to get made up here in the UK, it would be a great help

Thanks
Karl
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Karl
The 2 rear spacers (the smaller ones) I made are 45mm and the longer one is 54mm. The stock sizes are 40mm for the 2 rear and 50.5mm for the other.
 

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I bought the HF 7x10 lathe 10 years ago and within 8 months converted to a 7x14 using a new bed from Little Machine Shop. If you have not yet found that site stay away unless you want to spend money.



I have the mini-mill as well and have been very pleased with both.



They are made by Sieg Industrial in Shanghai and can best be thought of as pre-assembled assembly kits. First thing to do is dismantle as much as you feel comfortable doing, debur, scrape, and clean off and replace the fish oil lubricants with higher quality juices and gook.

Another good site is mini-lathe.com.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Cliffy, I've been a recent visitor to both Mini-Lathe.com and littlemachineshop.com, I like both places maybe too much. I'm currently saving up for a mill. The lathe as you said needed to be stripped down totally cleaned up re-lube and all moving surfaces lapped and adjusted properly. Best investment to date was quick change tool post.

What type of metals have you machined on the mill and what is the swing?
 

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The HF mini-mill is the Sieg X2 model, the throat is a bit more than 6"--here are the complete specs.

I have machined steel, cast iron, aluminum and other non-ferrous metals, and plastics; mostly cases and faceplates for electronic projects, including the Shumatech DRO which is IMHO a "must have" for the mini-mill.

PM Research #1, 1.000" bore x 1.500" stroke
A small steam engine (a WMV video)

A tiny one from barstock, 0.375" bore x 0.500" stroke


Ignition coil tester
 

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Kudos to yall!
Very nicely done. There is nothing more satisfying than doing it yourself.
Especially when it Turns (pun intended) out as well as yours did!
I love to play with my small manual mill and lathe.....shoot all my tools for that matter.:D
 
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