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Discussion Starter #1
So ther I am, doing my 600 mile service. Saving myself so hard earned green. Engine oil and filter, piece of cake. :D Transmission oil, bit of a challenge but with a little "engineering", using a drinking straw, a funnel, some tape and a graduated measuring cup, I got it sorted out. :wink: Moving on to the final drive. I loosen the drain bolt, then try the fill bolt and it promptly strips the hex hole. :shock: I spoke some words that would make a sailor faint and jumped up and down a bit. :x Now I am sitting here with a filler bolt that I have no idea how to remove. I thought I saw someone mention this before but after about ten minutes and countless variations of "stripped" and "bolt" and "final drive" I couldn't find the info on how to get that bugger out.
:cry:
 

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This is happening to enough people that I have to wonder what's going on.

First, is it really a hex hole, or is it a Torx hole? If folks are using the wrong tool, that could explain it.

As for what to do; first, get a replacement plug. It's Part # 09248-18004, shown as #9 on the fiche linked to below, and they run about $6.00.

http://www.ronayers.com/fiche/300_0346/case_final/case_final.bmp

After the replacelement arrives, you can work at getting the stuck one out.

Several options have been suggested:

Weld an old driver bit onto the stripped plug,

Drill a couple of holes in the flange of the stripped plug and stick some pins in the holes on which to grip with a crescent wrench and the like,

Fill the hole with two-part epoxy, stick in an old driver, wait for it to harden, then try to remove,

Cut a slot into the plug-head with a rotary tool (Dremmel, etc.), then use a chisel in the slot as a driver,

Take it to the dealer and let them get it out for you.

Good luck.
 

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I had this problem on my burg, where I stripped out the Hex socket on the final drive drain plug. I removed the factory-installed plug fairly easy. Using a hammer and chisel I carefully tapped around the outer edge of the plug in a counter-clockwise rotation.
 

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I guess I was lucky. I didn't strip out the head, just snapped off 2 different hex bits before the 3rd one finally broke it loose. The manufacturer or assembler needs to learn the term "torque wrench".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks brian. My first thought was to Epoxy a hex key in there but I didn't wanna sacrifice a good allen wrench. I guess I'll have to bite the bullet there. I had also thought of cutting a slot with a dremel tool and using an impact wrench as that has worked in the past for me but I was kinda worried about doing that seeing as how its the final drive that the bolt is stuck in. those other two ideas didn't even cross my mind.... That's why I love forums like this. Everybody's got a different piece of the puzzle.

Stupid bolt, the bottom one was a pain to break loose but it came loose. That top one seems to be welded in. I think you're right Buzz. Spec on those bolts is 24 ftlbs of torque but it's gotta have three times that on it. I had to practically stand on the bottom one to break it loose.
 

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I found that when I did my first gear oil change ,to synthetic lube, that I encountered it being hard to remove also. The bottom plug was easy, the top "filler" bolt ,very hard :twisted:

I found that I used a torque wrench on mine , the display read 57 pounds as the top bolt finally broke loose.

Must have been a bad day at the factory :eek:
 

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I changed my final drive oil at 14k miles, just after I bought the bike. The fill plug was partly stripped when I started, and completely stripped when I finished. The final drive was full of metal flakes, too. I suspect the previous owner (or his mechanic) noticed that he was starting to strip the fill plug and punted on the whole oil change. I haven't removed the stripped plug yet, but plan to try JBWeld first, and a big EZ-Out if that fails.

To get up & running, though, pick up a big syringe or baster and some vinyl tubing. Wrap a wad of paper towels around the tube and stuff it in the drain hole. "Inject" the correct amount of oil (measured) plus a little bit, then pull the paper towels out and quickly insert the drain plug.

I was able to pull this off with only a few drops of oil spilled, and it got me back on the road much quicker than trying to remove the stripped plug and waiting for a replacement to come in.

BTW, I used a 60cc syringe I bought at a local feed & tack shop for a couple bucks.
 

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Since it looks like these plugs are assembled incorrectly at the factory, to those who are attempting it for the first time service, I would suggest, prior to using the allen wrench to do the following:

Take a center punch and at the outside diameter of the plug, hammer an indentation.
Next, angle the center punch to drive it in a counterclockwise direction and give it a good couple of whacks. This should break the torque tension and allow the allen wrench to do the job.
I would bet money they use lock-tite in the assembly process, plus after 14000 miles the expansion/contraction from heat/cold and aging does a number on seizing of the threads
 

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All these great suggestions except one....don't weld. An electrical welder will probably fry some delicate electronics like the ECU or the ABS computer if you have an Executive.
 
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