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Discussion Starter #1
Is it normal to feel apprehensive about getting back into riding again? I sold my last motorcycle a couple of years ago and more or less put it behind me. Now with my 18 year old son wanting to ride I was looking forward to being together on the road but have this fear of getting creamed on the highway. Maybe it's just being a protective father that causes that... or is it a reality check saying am I not suited for motorcycle riding? :(
 

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Dad wrote
or is it a reality check saying am I not suited for motorcycle riding?
It could be your right, but I have that feeling every time before I ride and I believe it is just a mental note
that bike riding needs my full attention and nothing less will do.
Yes it's dangerous to ride, but then so is getting out of bed in the morning. You need to decide if it's worth it,
if you feel it is then use that feeling to make yourself a safer, smarter rider . 8)
 

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Yep! I too just got back in and have a 26 year old son who has a Triumph that he just bought this summer and I worry about him as well.

For myself, it was kind of like the old expression about riding a bike and I have been zipping around on the 4 lane highways and having a great time. My son took it other evening to go to the police station (had to get some papers signed) and my wife was after me every 15 minutes as to where he was! It is a good thing he lives on the other side of the country but it would be great to go riding together.
We did some 2-up while he was home visiting and I know he is not a stupid driver and it must have been very nerve racking for him to be driving my new Burgman with me as a passenger but he survived and handled it well.

I figure that it will pass and you will get to enjoy!
 

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I would say your feelings about your concern for your sons safety as perfectly natural and valid.

Some people undertake all sorts of potentially dangerous activities without fear - they normally come a cropper.

Channel your fear into risk amelioration - wearing the right gear all the time, sound pre ride checks and taking up additional training. In UK we can also book what they call 'observed rides' with the police or a training body for constructive criticism or pointers to better riding.
 

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Non-motorcyclists love to say that we riding enthusiasts have a death wish. The truth of the matter is exactly the opposite, we have a "life wish". We don't want to merely exist, we want to really live to the fullest and that sometimes means taking a risk. I don't want to die, but I certainly don't want to live to an old age without experiencing the fullness of life that I feel every time I go out riding. My advice is to take the necessary precautions, get training, wear protective clothing, ride aware, and enjoy every minute of it! I have three sons, and the most memorable times of my life are without a doubt the times we rode together, whether off-road along the trails or sport riding on the back roads. Motorcycling, done right, is good medicine!

Cheers,

Bob
 

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After not riding for almost 10 years I took the plunge at age 63 and bought a Burgman 400. I always think of the "issues" we face with the other guys and gals out there in vehicles with 4-16 wheels. I don't know if it's fear or just making sure I understand the risks and ride prepared for them :?: I love the 400 and ride as much as I can. Good luck. :p
 

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Dad, I agree with what other have said. I hadn’t ridden for 20+ years until last fall when I got started again. Since then I have almost 20K miles down the road. At first I was very uneasy and butterfly in the stomach before each ride. Now I still think about safety and try to get my mental state ratcheted up a few notches before getting on the bike. Go for it! A gal in our MSF course last fall said something that really made since to me. “When it all over, I don’t want to regret the things that I didn’t do.” Angel and I both are 67 ½ years old and will keep riding our bikes (both bicycle and motorcycles) as long as we safely can. :lol:
 

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My Son too

Dad, etal,

How timely for this subject to pop up. My son just sent me an email that he was going to get a motorcycle to go to work everyday in metropolitan Memphis, TN.

I must admit I had the same uneasy feeling you folks had about the wisdom of dubious intentions of our offspring. But reality is that they'll do what they want to do just as we have in our past. My big sister nearly had a cow when I resumed riding at age 62. Considering the many other things I've done in my lifetime that were considered to be unduly risky...like flying a small airplane over the jungles of Vietnam until finally being shot down, "Burger-ing" around the island is like going to heaven ahead of schedule. :twisted:

The last thing I want for my kid is to deny him the choice of being an adventurer or a observer. I hope he takes the adventure route.

BTW, I'm finally going to get the sidecar after 7 months of schmoozing the "Squeeze." She approved the acquisition late last week! :wav:
 

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Back in USAF Pilot Training we called it MOA (Manifestation of Apprehension). Except for the guys who had flown before pretty much everybody had it to some degree. Without being foolhardy those of us who got our wings dealt with the feeling and developed enough self confidence to strap on the birds every day and go fly. The 25% who couldn't deal with it went on to something else. Same for me now 30 years later. I bought a big BMW last fall and was so uncomfortable on it after three parking lot drops I sold it and bought a Burg 650. After a short test drive on the Burg I knew I would not feel apprehensive about it or my abilities to stay alive on it. If you buy something with two wheels make sure you are very comfortable with it on the test ride before parting with your dollars. I wasn't comfortable on the BMW and felt I would learn to handle it. Better to start off in a place where learning not to fear the machine isn't part of the process.

Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What great comments! Thanks for the advice and encouragement :lol:

Manifestation of Apprehension - love that term... Years ago I decided I wanted to try model RC Glider flying - it looked so graceful and relaxing.
I bought all the radio gear, and a 7' wing span electric powered glider kit which I spent several weeks building with absolutly stunning results. Long story-short, the first few times I launched it I was so worried about crashing and destroying all that hard work it took all the enjoyment and relaxation out of the hobby... sold everything a week later. :cry:
 

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Dad,

Lived in Mass. for a while and had a friend who buiilt r/c planes from scratch. He spent one winter building a scale C-123 with a 110" wingspan (1"=1'). When spring came he invited me to watch the maiden flight since I was flying real 123's at the time. When we got to the field he used he told me another fellow would be flying since he really didn't like that part of the hobby. So he started the two engines and the plane rose smoothly into the air. Within 30 seconds it was a pile of balsa and fabric on the ground maybe 100 yards away. Didn't phase my friend in the least. He lived for the building, not the flying. Never have been able to understand that but I think you were right to sell something you could not smile about when it crashed (and it would have sooner or later). Different strokes . .

Carl
 

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Burger Bob said:
Been there, done that, must have built, flown and crashed at least 500 'planes over the last 40 or so years!

Cheers,

bob
Hope you are talking R/C and not Boeing! :wink: :wink:
 

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fear of riding

Dad, I get a little of that apprehension too, and am a retired, age 63, airline pilot.I think it's a healthy way to start out , considering the consequences of what a careless attitude might bring. I'm not a real experienced rider, although I had a Harley for a while.It was so clumsy to ride around town in tight situations and shifting in heavy beach traffic was such a pain, that I got a Honda Helix, and then the fun began.After I got good on the Helix, I figured the Burgman would be even more fun, and I'm right.However, I stay off the interstates when I can.18 wheelers still make me nervous.Glad you're with the group. Billy C.
 

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Preparation

Take the time to do the training and practice rides. Your confidence
will build.

I know of one mistake to avoid. If you're worrying about your
son, your eyes will be on him all the time (either in front or behind you)
and not on the road like they should be. I've done this mistake before.
I was spending more time watching (fearfully) my girlfriend trailing
behind me, than where I was going. Luckily, I didn't rear end any
parked cars.
 

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Re: Preparation

Monterey10 said:
...I know of one mistake to avoid. If you're worrying about your son, your eyes will be on him all the time (either in front or behind you) and not on the road like they should be....
Best to ride your own ride; but if you are with a neophyte and feel you simply must keep an eye on him, he should be in front. It's tempting to say "Follow me," but better to observe from behind and give suggestions later based on your observations.
 
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