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I failed my test (again) :-( :cry:
On two occassions moved off without fully retracting side stand !
Other than that one minor (for a late signal on a roundabout)

Sheesh I was so wound up from last time all I could think of was
getting that U turn correct (which I did this time).

It is only with the greatest inner strength do I refrain from
slipping into more colourful language ;-) :wink:

Feeling really hacked off. :evil: :oops: :shock: :? :( :!: :roll:

NormanB
 

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relax

migz123 said:
Keep practicing, those are important things you will need to know ! :) Good luck.
relax, relax, relax, you have life time of riding ahead. Think of country roads

"Did those feet in ancient times, walk upon England's mountains green?
was the holy land of G-d in Englands pleasant pastures seen?

was the countenance divine, shone forth upon these clouded hills,

was Jerusalem built here...amongst these dark satanic mills?'


feel better? That should do it.


NOW GO RIDE AND GET IT RIGHT THIS TIME OR ELSE THE WHOLE USA BURGMAN CONTINGENT IS COMING OVER THERE ON A CHEAP CHARTER FLIGHT AND WE WILL BEAT YOU TO WITHIN AN INCH OF YOUR LIFE FOR EMBARASSING US.
 

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Norman,

Unlike this loud talking, sharp shooting, burger eating bunch of Americans, I'm actually British. As fas as I know, they don't even require a test to ride over there - just proof that they can salute the Star and Stripes, and can point out an A-rab when they see one ;-).

Seriously though, I know the British test and understand your frustration - although I myself passed first time, both back home and over here in Tokyo where the test is skills based (picture trials riding over 30cm 10m long bridges, and over kerbs simulating off road terrain on a CB750) and far more technical than the British test.

My brother failed once for prematurely rolling forward over the stop line when in the right turn only lane at traffic lights, when the green straight ahead arrow was illiuminated, as opposd to the right turn arrow. The **** happens.

One disease that we have in England is that we think that passing the test first time shows that we have skill - it doesn't. Our test is wholely inadequate, so it doesn't matter when you pass it... Secondly, we tend to think that training is belittling, and something for 'learners' - again, the opposite is true. It's empowering, and ongoing training and learning is an important part of the art of motorcycling.

My advice is:

1. Slow things down and imagine that you are riding with a Policeman behind you. Do everything in slow motion, as smoothly as possible, and relax.

2. Moving off without the sidestand retracted is criminal - whilst also being a fault of the particular machine that you were riding. Japanese bikes have an engine cut device fitted that won't allow you to engage 1st gear with the stand down. That said, take your time. Kick the stand up so that it makes a noise, indicate and look over your shoulder before pulling off - everything you know already. Do everything. But relax.

3. Know your test route. If you have a car license, drive it often and learn where the blackspots are - the funny lane discipline junctions, the sudden changes in speed limits. If you haven't a car license, ask a friend to drive you, or cycle it.

4. If you had the same examiner twice and you think he has something against you personally, change your test centre. He holds the power to pass or fail you.

5. Find the easiest test centre around - route, nice examiner, or where it is known that the examiner travels by car and you on bike. It was that way in Bristol where I did my test, and although he had taxi plates and could use the bus lanes I lost him in moments and spent most of the 30 minute test waiting for him at theside of the road.

6. If you have a kind friend with a GS500 that will let you ride it in a car park to practice, then don't hesitate. Confidence with your machine is everything.
7. Don't take you failure personally - it doesn't matter one bit how man times it takes you to pass, as if you are clever once you pass this test you'll be taking other test (Advanced Rider, or other similar qualificsations).

Good luck, brother.
 

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Here in state of Florida, USA, you have to pass a written test and a road test to get a motorcycle license for any scooter or bike over 50cc . I am taking the 3 day motorcycle class and if I get through this sucessfully I do not have to go to the Driver's license Bureau to take the written or road test. I am assuming my 3 day class will have some sort of testing. I think some states in the USA just require you to have a regular motor vehicle license. I am riding my Burgie 400 and being very careful to obey all laws because if I am caught without a license there is a hefty fine. Good luck.
 

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Every state that I'm famiiar with has required a specific motorcycle code on your driver's license. I've been licensed in Texas, Connecticut, and Nebraska. I took tests in Connecticut and Texas (years ago). Nebraska simply transfered my Connecticut motorcycle endorsement when I moved here.

What always gave me fits was the "cone" test, where you had to weave your motorcycle at very low speed between a series of tightly spaced cones - without hitting a cone or touching a foot down. Very difficult to do with some motorcycles, and I fail to see how pertinent it is to safely riding a motorcycle on the street.
 

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The first "test" I took, when I moved to Arizona in 1976 went as follows:

I went to the motor vehicle department at the art deco courthouse in Bisbee, filled out the app for an Arizona Driver's license and indicated I wanted a motorcycle endorsement. The examiner, an ex-Texas Ranger, went out with me to view my motorcycle. "How long you been ridin' these things, boy?" "Since 1964," I answered.

"Well," he said, "You must be doin' somethin' right. You're still alive." And that was that.

The second time, in the same state, occurred in 1994. The examiner followed me for five miles until we arrived at an abandoned agriculture check station on a rural state highway. He got out of his pickup, unloaded cone markers, and placed them about 15 feet apart in a straight row.

"Now what you gotta do is ride between them cones. You hit one, that's it, you're disqualified."

So I got on my motorcycle and wended my way through the cones, not touching one. Given the spacing, it was hardly a challenge. When I finished, he yelled at me, "I'm gonna give you one more chance, but by God this time you gotta be sittin' down on the goddam seat."

I was riding a a Yamaha XT350 enduro bike and had simply stood on the pegs as I negotiated the "course." So I sat down, and passed.

Obviously, there was nothing in this exam that tested your ability to handle the bike in emergency situations, nor was there anything in the procedured to evaluate your ability to handle it in traffic.
 

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Ted, that's a pretty funny story.

It's recently been revised, but the Japanese 401cc plus test used to be run by the ultra nutter rider technique obsessed Police. There was one test every three months. The pass rate was 4%.

That is why the Japan market traditionally was domnated by machines of capcities up to 400cc. It will also explain why the RC30 was replicated with the 400cc NC30 - a high tech sublime gem for the home market. 750s were built for WSBK in accordance with homologation rules. 600s and litre bikes were built for export. Note that the Bandit 600 has a single front disc - the Bandit 400 has twin front discs. They saved the best for the home market...

Anyway, in order to help sales of motorcycles for Suzukawa, Honda and Yamaha, the regulations were changed, the Japanese market was basically opened up to unlimited capacity motorcycles, Harley sales soured - but the pass rate is still extremely low. It takes an average of 45 hours to pass the unlimted test here - it is taken on a test centre CB750. It's a pretty tough centre based test.

Paul, I know what you mean about there being no direct link, but I've come to think that any riding skill that a rider can develop is a good thing if it means that he knows how to handle his bike. Every little helps, and confidence is key with motorcyle control, don't you think?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi

I thought I had better update you and close this thread.

My third test (6th May) went very badly and I failed. Well I say badly but only because the examiner reckoned I hit the kerb during the U turn as he saw the handlebars twitch as I completed the turn. But honestly I did not hit the kerb and the handlebars only 'twitched' as I went over a scaffolding clamp in the gully! - which I could not avoid. At the test centre we discussed this point briefly but it was his 'train set' and he prevailed -and I failed. I was gutted - nay devastated!! :evil:

I immediately booked my next test for 21 May, but was full of gloom, despondancy and self doubt.

I had the afternoon of the 20th on the bike with the instructor and really settled into again with confidence and loadsa cracking U turns. The morning of the 21st I was back on the bike at 7.30 for some additional before the test at 11:40 - I was ****! I could not do U turns consistently well and I was nervous and shaking inside as the panic increased the nearer we got to the witching hour.

I just could not seem to calm myself and even thought of popping into an 'offy' for a can of beer to settle myself - but didn't.

The test ride went fine, 2 minors (life saver and an early misleading signal - which I realised as I committed them but could do nowt about - a beaut of a U turn (if I say so myself) and after that U turn I really calmed right down (the inner shaking stopped) and I actually enjoyed the last 20 minutes of the test. The examiner made my day with the 'You have passed - it was a good ride' and my emotion was predominately one of relief. :lol:

I know this is just the start and I intend to take more advanced training/observed riding. I am determined to develop into a thorougly competent rider, if for no other reason than to remain alive!

I would like to thank you all for your support and kind words in this thread, I couldn't face posting after my 3rd failure. :oops:

NormanB
 

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Well Done NormanB!
You got there in the end, and thats what counts.
What test did you pass, full? Not sure what all the different classes there are these days, I passed mine 25 years ago and just had to ride around a block, while the instructor walked around watching you!
What bike are you going to get?

Andy
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks.

Full test no restrictions or time barriers.
I pick up a 400 Burgie (without cheese) on Monday.
Then it is a 140 mile ride home - hope the weather holds.

NormanB
 

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Randy said:
Congratulations on passing what sounds like a tough test with tougher instructors .
Why no cheese . :lol:
My test in Lynn, MA 30 years ago was , " two right hand circles, two left hand circles, and two figure eights - " no cones. then, " go up the street and make a few shifts and come back here". When I made the turn I thought the examiner (who was on his HArley), would have followed me...

When I returned, he was nowher to be found. I went in to the oroifice, and he came out the back and handed me my license. ":Be careful out there kid".

I wonder how many good riders fail just due to test anxiety, and not due to technique.?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Randy said:
Congratulations on passing what sounds like a tough test with tougher instructors .
Why no cheese . :lol:
Thanks Randy ( and all)

Actually, the UK test is not actually that difficult - as long as you manage to pass it first time. If not, then it is really a pyschological test or trial more than anything. Normally I perform pretty well under pressure but that examiner really got to me and had me rattled no matter how I tried to rationalise or develop alternateand distracting strategies.

The UK test is essentially a test on the public highway, with the examiner following on a bike (or a car) and in radio one way contact. Faults can be accrued as the ride continues and they are classed as major or minor. There are a couple of set pieces, the U turn and the emergency stop. The former is supposed to be a test of low speed control, which actually starts off with the bike safe/engine off and the candidate stood alongside. The examiner then instructs you to walk the bike round - they are checking that the bike can actually turn in the width of the selected road and that you make the necessary safety observations. Then you motor it round if you fail to do this - hit the kerb, put down a foot - mandatory fail no repeat trys no appeals. The emergency stop is contrived and the examiner will step out and give a prearranged signal and you must bring the bike to a stop (from around 30 mph and retain contol of the bike. This manoeuvre is completed by moving the bike safely to the kerb. There are oral questions too, bike maintenance/checking and pillion carrying considerations etc etc. In all you could pass with 14 minor faults accrued but most people foul up with a major which is a mandatory fail. Discretion seems to be on the side of failure.



NormanB
 

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Norm,

Good work. You are a survivor. Now forget the hoops that you had to jump through, and enjoy the machine of your choice.

Lycheed
 

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Congrats Norm! :thumbright:
Knew you could pull it off. Have a safe ride home on your new scoot.
 
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