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my 2005 650 was flooded with salt water. it started and runs. my home and garage was flooded by Sandy and the burgman started right up. i drove it to higher ground. The rockaways to Flushing. The trany does not shift well and I have to shift manualy. the dash is giving me F2 errors. Any ideas? i am fully insured and am contacting my agent.
 

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Salt water is pernicious and all pervasive and the longer it is in contact with the bike the damage continues even after it dries out.

If you have insurance cover the least painful way may be to say goodbye to the bike take the loot and start again.

If you want to tackle yourself, you will probably have to do a substantial strip out and wash out virtually every electrical connector and dry and then dielectric grease on each connector. Depending on how deep the immersion you will also have to take action on mechanical bits too, thorough fresh water washing and strip down - and at the end of all of that you will probably still not have a reliable bike - You could spend weeks and weeks on this to no satisfactory result or you could spend a few hours and be OK - tough call.
 

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+1 to what Norman said... I used to be an insurance adjuster... flood damage is always bad.. Salt water is worse... your bike , I'm afraid, is done.. repairs always outstrip the value of whatever was flooded..
 

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If the flooding was above the level of the CVT then you probably had water in it. The CVT does not take kindly to having water inside it especially salt water. I would suspect that even if you do get rid of the codes the life of the CVT will be short.
 

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I would also be cautious on buying any other vehicle for quite awhile that came from the area affected by Sandy. Good deals might be simply someone wanting to pass on their salt water immersed vehicle that will cause you trouble.

Chris
 

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^ this happened here after Katrina. Several used car lots were shut-down after being caught selling flooded and "totaled" vehicles purchased from insurers in Louisiana and Mississippi.
 

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Buffalo said:
If the flooding was above the level of the CVT then you probably had water in it. The CVT does not take kindly to having water inside it especially salt water. I would suspect that even if you do get rid of the codes the life of the CVT will be short.
Yup if the water got up to that I'd get rid of it and get a replacement out of state.
 

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BTW, I think you may have misread that indicator on the dash. As far as I can find there is no such thing as a F2 indicator. At least there is no mention of it in either my owners manual or my shop manual. What the dash will show is an FI indicator.
 

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When I was an adjuster and there was a flood, whether it was salt or fresh water, we would total vehicles automatically.. no repairs.. and there would always be someone that wanted to insist that we pay for repairs rather than a total.. and we would refuse... simply no future in it.. I did it in Ohio for a few fresh water floods, and in Massachusetts when I was the dept. manager after the blizzard of 78... the issue was the same.. If you started in repairs, you would own the brakes, the wiring, the hydraulics and the engine when they all started to rust and that was way before a CPU ran everything.. simply total it and sell the salvage with a flood title and hope it was compacted and not re-titled somewhere else.
 

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sorry to hear about your troubles...

alas if the flood waters managed to get above the foot boards, there is a good chance that water got into the CVT Assembly via the CVT Exhaust and filter.

At this point, I would stop riding it, drop the CVT and clean the inside of any foreign impurities etc...

I would take all the tupperware off and steam wash the engine etc...

if you are a DIYer, you can do it yourself with a few basic tools...

But considering how water finds its way into the smallest openings, you may also have a contaminated engine...

see what the insurance company says, in all probability they will total it and you can get a new one, the 2013's are on their way.

all the best....
 

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Noth said:
When I was an adjuster and there was a flood, whether it was salt or fresh water, we would total vehicles automatically.. no repairs.. and there would always be someone that wanted to insist that we pay for repairs rather than a total.. and we would refuse... simply no future in it.. I did it in Ohio for a few fresh water floods, and in Massachusetts when I was the dept. manager after the blizzard of 78... the issue was the same.. If you started in repairs, you would own the brakes, the wiring, the hydraulics and the engine when they all started to rust and that was way before a CPU ran everything.. simply total it and sell the salvage with a flood title and hope it was compacted and not re-titled somewhere else.
It is a small world. I was literally just talking with a new neighbor who moved here from Brimfield (MA) and one of the topics of discussion was the blizzard of '78. I was in Osterville at the time and had no power for 14 days...
 

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I was stuck in the Riverside Holiday Inn up at th end of the Riverside line.. I had just been transferred in.. I ran up a bar tab (in 1978 dollars !) of almost $700.. My company paid it luckily. as I had no bank account locally then or any credit card.. I had run a tab for a week..
 
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