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The front pulley of the CVT is ALWAYS directly connected to the engine, so is always spinning, and the rear pulley of the CVT is also ALWAYS direct connected to the clutch at the other end, and only the belt between the pulleys making that connection between the pulleys... also ALWAYS so that both pulleys are always spinning. The clutch is the only part that is not always engaged with the final drive. The input side of the clutch is ALWAYS spinning but the output side is not at low rpm. The clutch engagement is controlled by rpm. When rpm goes over 1800 the clutch engages. When rpm drops to around 1500 the clutch dis-engages. If you pretend to be a Harley rider and rev your engine up past 1800 rpm then you put excess strain on the clutch pads (clutch pack would likely be the clutch plates and pads assembly... big round cover on the left side just in front of the final drive swing arm). If you do this often or hold it there for very long you will damage the clutch and possibly other mechanical bits. This is not a muscle bike to be used for showing off engine sounds at high revs. There is no clutch lever to keep the clutch dis-engaged and no neutral gear.

BTW- I just did a Google search on the Mobile 1 bottle label and all samples that came up showed that this oil IS "Resource Conserving" in the bottom outer ring of the API service circle. I know that the graphic I posted above only shows Energy Conserving, but Resource Conserving is really the same thing, at least as far as the problems that will happen. That's why I mentioned it. If you have a bottle of Mobile 1 that does in fact show nothing, totally blank, nada in that lower outer ring then you should be fine. I'd recheck just to be sure.
Thanks for the info. I am being more educated by the day. After re-examining oil, it doesn’t have anything in the lower circle. It also is not JASO, Mia culpa. I rode over 13K on same lube. On my educational journey, I found a notice in the manual from the 05, that tells not to “rev” more than about 3 seconds. Limited rpms. Duh I did! With your info I believe that I wore the friction pads at a very accelerated rate. Leaving me with a slipping clutch. When it was on the center stand, and I rev d, if I didn’t apply brakes it may not be in this state. Thank you all for this great forum. And le dude for the videos.
 

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So 10w40 Jaso MA oil for the engine (such as Suzuki Motorcycle oil) but it is ok to use any good 10w40 motorcar oil such as Mobil 1 for the transmission even if it is the "engine conserving" type, right? Or is just better to use the exact same oil that went into the engine, for the transmission as well.
 

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Much more economical to use the same in both. Keep in mind that what is called the "transmission" in the Burgman 650 is NOT really a transmission as most think of a transmission on a bike. It is really simply a reduction gear set in its own module that takes the output of the clutch and "transmits" that to the proper rotation to the input of the final drive. Oil doesn't flow into or out of this reduction gear set module, so it is not shared like the clutch shares oil with the engine (through plumbing between those two). It doesn't take very much oil so not worth buying something separate just for that. IMO.

I would still use JASO MA/MA2 oil in there. Just for warranty if nothing else (if yours is new enough for that).

Edit: as Dave said a few posts after this one, oil from the clutch/engine has been known to sneak past the bearing between the transmission/gear reduction casing and clutch. So another reason just to keep it all the same.
 

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So 10w40 Jaso MA oil for the engine (such as Suzuki Motorcycle oil) but it is ok to use any good 10w40 motorcar oil such as Mobil 1 for the transmission even if it is the "engine conserving" type, right? Or is just better to use the exact same oil that went into the engine, for the transmission as well.
Do “NOT” use conserving. If the info ring has anything in the lower section of this ring it has been stated that it is too slippery and your chance for problems is very probable. My clutch problem was created by having brakes on, I reved it more than 1800 rpms - longer than a couple of seconds. It was like holding the friction pads against a sanding belt. Now the pads are too small/thin. Ordered the “clutch pack” today. $150. Hope my lesson is shared. Weather is warming and I’m jonesing to ride.
 

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The 650 has been known to swap oil between the engine and the transmission so I'd just use the same JASO-MA oil in both. I think 4 quarts does both anyway.
 
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So 10w40 Jaso MA oil for the engine (such as Suzuki Motorcycle oil) but it is ok to use any good 10w40 motorcar oil such as Mobil 1 for the transmission even if it is the "engine conserving" type, right? Or is just better to use the exact same oil that went into the engine, for the transmission as well.

NO, NO, NO, NO, absolutely NOT !

It must be JASO-MA approved, brand does not matter as long as JASO-MA approved.
I have been using for more years than I can remember Shell ROTELLA Diesel oil of which a couple of their products are JASO-MA approved ( not all Shell oil is JASO-MA approved so check the labels ) never ever had a problem with Shell Rotella. By the way in North America Shell Rotella is very popular with many motorcyclists including Goldwing and BMW motorcycle owners. Presently I have a 9 litre jug of Rotella T4.
.

90275
 

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After reading these posts last night I had a big ? so I immediately went to my oil and found Mobil 1 5w30 but then realized that is what I am using in the car. I now remember that with my last oil change I used some motorcycle oil 10w40 and it was Jaso Ma marked. I sighed a sigh of relieve.
 

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I've always ran conventional supertech 10w-30 energy star oil in my bikes including this Burgman for the past 5 years.
I never had a clutch issue. The last bike was a 140hp bike I owned for years and would also take to the drag strip and run excellent times. I believe there are different types of friction modifiers and only a certain type can attack friction plates. I'm guessing that type isn't in this oil.

Before everyone jumps on me about this, I want to say I'm not advocating others do the same. to each your own. This is just my story.
I will say there is a bit of irony in the logic of not using an energy conserving oil. While MC tested oil provides tested data that the oil could not attack a friction plate, you the buyer loose the benefits of the friction modifiers on all the other engine parts, such as rings, pistons, etc.. which these auto oils have been tested to improve the life of, along with better gas mileage . Maybe that's another reason I get better mpg than most with the same bike.
 

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Actually there are friction "enhancers" in most motorcycle oils, even without the extra modifiers that are added for Energy/Resource Conserving rating. There is research that shows (though I don't have it in front of me now but it's easy to find online) that the extra friction modifiers that make oil Energy/Resource Conserving WILL damage clutch plates if it is a wet clutch, though the damage can take more or less time to show. Just looked up the bottle of that oil and it is Energy/Resource Conserving. Not all bikes and scooters have a wet clutch. For those that don't you don't need to think if it is or is not Energy/Resource Conserving since the oil in the engine doesn't touch the clutch. I don't know what scooter you have now.
 

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I’m still riding the 650 Burgman. Wet clutch. My last bike I had for 12 years, on the energy star oil and the clutch was still fine when I sold it. Like, I stated earlier , I read somewhere only a couple of types of friction modifiers can damage friction plates. I’m guessing this cheap super tech oil doesn’t contain the damaging type. I’ll have to look for that article again sometime. If in the future years I ever do get clutch issues, I’ll post of it here.
I also put that same oil in the transmission. The transmission oil draining comes out looking like new with hardy anything stuck on the drain plug.
 

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While Charboil is getting away with using "Energy Conserving" oil, so many other bikers have had major $$$$ failures.

Without a complete list of KNOWN oils that do not have the adverse modifiers added....

I advise NO ONE to follow the use of said oil that Charboil is using ! ! !

Sorry.
 
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