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In the removing the blown out rear tire I found the previous owner had messed the exhaust stud bolts up. One sheered off the other um how shall we say this, it is redneck engineered. I'd like to put in new studs, any advice would great be appreciated.
 

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If I remember right those studs are welded into the flange on the header pipe. I know Suzuki does not list the studs as a separate item on the parts fiche. You might be able to remove the header pipe and get someone to weld new studs in but that will probably cost you as much as a new header pipe. You also might be able to drill the studs out and replace them with a bolt and nut.

The part number for the pipe is 14150-15F30 and it runs about $70. If you want to look at it on the part fiche here is a link to one. http://www.partshark.com/fiche_section_detail.asp?section=300313&category=Scooters&make=SUZUKI&year=2003&fveh=7244
The header pipe is item number 3.
 

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I have seen 2 others uniquely engineered when their studs broke. Both fixes worked well enough and were mechanically sound. As long as there is no exhaust leaking it is not a problem. With that said I personally would spend the $70 and get a new header and paint it with VHT paint with the highest Temp rating you can find so it would look better and last longer.
 

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I believe that is exactly what I'll do. I think correct in this case is just a much better option. I'm going to put anti seize on the bolts so that I don't create the same issue.
 

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If anyone has this problem of the stud holding the muffler to the flange twisting off, I had this problem and I have a fix. It requires a hack saw blade only because there is no room to use a hacksaw in there. Using just the blade, take your time and cut the remaining bolt off if it protrudes beyond the surface of the flange. It is a soft bolt and taking your time with breaks to rest your hand, it takes about 20 to 25 minutes to cut it off. Next it is necessary to drill out the remaining stud. To do so and get it on center, remount the muffler and if you have one stud intact, tighten the bolt to pull the muffler flange surface up tight to the exhaust pipe flange. This is necessary so you can have a drill guide to place the drill bit in the center of the stud. Now find a drill bit that fully fills the bolt hole in the muffler flange so it does not move around and permits you to place the drill bit in the center of the broken stud. It is only necessary to drill a good starting hole so you can then remove the muffler and now begin drilling a pilot hole and progress upward to the size that permits you to place a 6mm bolt in the hole where the stud was once in place. After drilling the hole and cleaning up both surfaces of the flange with a file, place a 6mm stainless bolt of sufficient length to attach the muffler. Be sure to use anti-seize compound to prevent having to go through this whole drill (no pun intended) again. I am told an anti-seize compound containing copper is necessary because of the temperature incurred at this joint. I know I could have taken the exhaust pipe off at the connection to the head...but if I had a problem with the aluminum threads adhering to the steel bolts, well I then would have had a much greater problem.
 
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