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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thank you for reading, its long-winded :mad: I also thank the posters who contributed to the recent posts about the MIVV units. I may go with one of those. What are the weight of the advantages: 10lbs lighter and more pleasing sound? Any other advantages (looks I guess). It looks like I can obtain a stock for just a hair less in cost.

However, to continue my story, I think there are 30-35k mi on my 2006 400AN Burgman. ODO/speed sensor is long gone. Because of what I perceived as a super pricey (for my low-income budget) OEM or upgrade mufflers that fit my Burger, I've purchased and installed 2 used ones after the first one gave out. So, glancing on eBay yesterday, I spotted no stock mufflers in a fair price range. What's available for pre-07s seem so expensive for a muffler, imho. I followed up my earlier post with a call directly to Suzuki Cycles. They told me they can sell me the original muffler for $560. Flippin' nuts. I see its available at Parts Zilla for $412. Available at another online site for $308. Still super pricey imho for a part with no moving parts and no electronics.

What is the typical price for a muffler? Anyone with more experience welcome to comment. I've seen one poster here say that the price for a MIVV (~$325) is a fair one. Perhaps my frustration over dollar cost isn't warranted.

Well then, however, I have to ask: Would you cut off the header of the old muffler and weld on a compatible muffler? I prefer not to wait until an affordable used or new stock muffler pops up on eBay and for what its worth, I'm tired of going through them so quickly (last one lasted only a few months!).

I found a scooter shop that will do welding cheaply. The guy is warm to the idea of finding a more inexpensive muffler ($20-40 shop time hour) (finding and purchasing it is my mission should I choose to accept it) and finagling the weld and mounting bracket to work. I have the old muffler so I suppose i could use the connecting pipe (header), sawn off for the starting point for welding on a new muffler. So, I am looking for motorcycle mufflers in the 400cc range. Would anyone with more engineering/mechanical know-how recommend some to shop for? I'm going to shoot for something in the $150 range or less. That's compared to a $308+tax/ship new stock burger muffler.

I can afford to plunk down $350 incl tax for a stock or a MIVV but its annoying. If its sound I wouldn't mind trying for this 'compatibility' workaround. Thanks, and please post any advice or misgivings about this proposed approach!
 

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#1 ODO/speed sensor is long gone.

#2 I followed up my earlier post with a call directly to Suzuki Cycles. They told me they can sell me the original muffler for $560. Flippin' nuts. I see its available at Parts Zilla for $412. Available at another online site for $308. Still super pricey imho for a part with no moving parts and no electronics.

#3 What is the typical price for a muffler? Anyone with more experience welcome to comment. I've seen one poster here say that the price for a MIVV (~$325) is a fair one. Perhaps my frustration over dollar cost isn't warranted.

#4 Well then, however, I have to ask: Would you cut off the header of the old muffler and weld on a compatible muffler? I prefer not to wait until an affordable used or new stock muffler pops up on eBay and for what its worth, I'm tired of going through them so quickly (last one lasted only a few months!).
#1 you need to fix that as it is illegal to ride without the speedo and odometer. Some areas take it seriously and you could get a big ticket if they catch it.

#2 maybe pricey but there is a reason - catalytic converter - that means it has platinum inside, far more expensive than moving parts or electronics!

#3 Aftermarket pipes for a bike of this size range from $150 for a cheap brand up to $750 or so for very pricey brand. This is assuming a full kit and not just a slip-on. Sadly no cheap brand has a offering for the Burgman 400. The MIVV pipe is actually low compared to what the LeoVince cost when it was available and a lot cheaper than Yoshimura!

#4 I have considered doing just what you are suggesting except for one thing. I would make sure the muffler can be removed without having to pull the entire pipe. This makes pulling the rear wheel so much easier when the tire needs to be changed.
 

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A slip on muffler can be used for sure but mounting and securing it takes some creativity or fabrication work. I do not weld or bend large pipes so I went for the whole system.

PS - A little super glue gel can fix your speedo or the replacement part is cheap enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Awesome feeling to get a response to this thread. I'm getting more used to the idea of the MIVV, fwiw, so thanks to all for expanding on the bang for your buck, ymmv. I'd still like someone to point out an affordable muffler that would be a good 'fit' with a creative welder/fabricator. There are some possibilities like this one on eBay, seems like a fair purchase and the work would be get it angled so that a bracket-mount could be fabricated, eh?

I'd love to fix the ODO but i don't know if its the speed sensor or what. Looks like those crop up for around $50 used. I've had the devil of a time trying to remove the ignition assembly (failed utterly) and so if by chance the same disassembly is required to install a new speed sensor I'd definitely consider paying for the shop time to have a pro do it. Is there any other major suspect involved? I agree its not worth a potential ticket and its kind of nerve-wracking at inspection time since the ODO never moves. :)
 

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The normal reason the speedo quits working is that the rotor on the sensor mounted down on the front wheel fails due to the grease on it drying out. You access it by removing the front wheel. The sensor is that round black housing on the right side with the wire going to it. Pry the grease seal out and pull the rotor out. You will probably find it in two or more pieces. If it is not to badly broken up you can glue it back together regrease it and install it and the seal back in. If it is to broken up a new one is pretty cheap. It's item 21 on this fiche http://www.partshark.com/fiche_sect...gory=Scooters&make=SUZUKI&year=2003&fveh=7244
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sweet* Thanks Buffalo, I'll get that looked at as soon as I can get the pinch bolt out on the front fork. I actually started to strip it, it would come off counter-clockwise (lefty-lucy) right? Used an allen wrench and a cheater but it just started stripping. I think that has to get loosened before you can get the wheel off? I have a new tire to put on asap, so I might need a shop with an impact wrench or something to finesse that pinch bolt. Dunno really! I'll report back when I get my ducks in a row.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'll be taking it to the shop because I need the new front tire mounted. Thanks for the tool advice, I really should have those sockets if my dad doesn't. Impact wrench too I'd imagine. Anyone reading know if there is a homegrown method for removing and replacing a tire on the front wheel? Shops around here were quoting me at $30 + tax for this service. I found 'the guy' who is performing it for $15/pop.
 

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I changed all my own tires on my Zuma and plan to try it on my Burgman when it comes time. However it is not an easy job! It takes some work and a second person is handy if not required, unless you have some fancy tools.

The job breaks down like this -
#1 remove the wheel
#2 deflate and break the bead of the tire
#3 remove the old tire
#4 put new tire on
#5 seat the tire and inflate
#6 remount the wheel on the bike.

#1 and #6 are easy.
#2 is hard to do without a bead breaker but possible to do by hand. I stand on the tire and using a short piece of 2x4 I hit it with a small sledge hammer. Place the 2x4 on the rubber right next to the rim. Usually once it breaks at one point it the rest of the bead pops but sometimes you have to break it in more spots. You have to break the bead on both sides of the wheel.
#3 is tricky with 10 inch wheels but is easier with larger ones. The trick is to use tire spoons. This is where an extra set of hands comes in handy as one person can hold one spoon while the other works another spoon around the diameter of the rim. Again you have to do this for both sides of the tire.
#4 is the opposite of #3 but is usually a fair amount easier as the new tires are more flexible. One thing that helps is to use some dish soap as a lubricant. The soap also helps with the next step of seating.
#5 is either super simple or a pain! With the tire in place the bead needs to seat onto the rim. You really need a good compressor to do this easily. With fast high PSI compressor the tire will 'pop' into place, you can then finish filling up the tire with air. If it won't then you have to use a strap clamp or such to force the tire into place and then air it up enough to hold, then remove the strap and finish airing up.

These larger wheels need balancing but several here are using roller beads that go inside the tires and seem happy with the results{that is what I plan on doing}.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That is a beautifully worded and well-explained tutorial; that's coming in handy! I watched the fellow at the shop; he spent over half an hour and he had a bead breaker. He had 3 of those spoons and told me a story: First time he used them he left one wedged and as he took his and off it popped up into a ceiling and stuck there; when he looked up it fell and hit him right in the eye. He also used motor oil for lube rather than dish soap. :))

On the muffler front, I ordered a MIVV today. $323 incl shipping, probably pre-tax. Their need is only for a $100 deposit up front. They told me they were aware of the guy who made a video of his MIVV install and that a fire was definitely lit under them to get this onto the webstore. They claim to be the sole U.S. distributor.

bp :()
 

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Discussion Starter #11
PJ Parts shipped it: MIVV exhaust arrives today. WOOT! Here's the night before picture. Install pictures will be posted tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Install went smoothly. It comes with an aluminum bushing which in my case necessitated taking the old, outward-facing bushing out. I noticed small "burps" & pops when decelerating. I called PJs Parts and was told this is normal, just burning a little excess fuel perhaps. The sound is louder which is fine with me. I think I prefer a softer sound however. Performance was otherwise outstanding. I haven't convinced myself it is faster off the line as was reported on this exhaust elsewhere. Video links below:

Video of old stock muffler (with audio): http://youtu.be/505osBBC0wg
Video of new MIVV exhaust (with audio: http://youtu.be/aj6RWWkZjVo
 

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I like the new sound better. It is a touch louder with a fuller more controlled tone. If that makes sense. Your idle may be a tad low. I moved mine up to 1550. As recommended. That got rid of that annoying miss at idle and its better off the line. No more little waver starting from a traffic light.
 
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