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Well, at just over 4500 miles from new, my rear tyre is needing replacement. Thought I'd have got a bit more than that but may have been down to the type of riding I do and the fact that I run the pressures a bit on the high side. Very easy to remove wheel - remove final drive cover, two brake caliper bolts and one wheel shaft and bingo - it's off. I decided to stay with original Bridgestones as that what Suzuki fitted from new. I don't have enough riding experience or confidence to deviate from that

[attachment=3:ld9gx2iw]tyre4515.JPG[/attachment:ld9gx2iw]

I have car tyre removal equipment in my workplace so removing and refitting the tyre from the rim was straightforward but I wouldn't have liked to have done it by hand!

[attachment=1:ld9gx2iw]tyre fitting.jpg[/attachment:ld9gx2iw]

We don't have a M/C adaptor for the balancing machine so I balanced it 'old stylee'! Using the wheelshaft and a pair of axle stands, I let the wheel settle down and find its own heavy spot. I then refitted the two original 10g weights opposite this heavy spot and tried again. Still heavy so I changed one 10g weight for a 15g one. Nearly there. Finally changed the other 10g weight for a 15g and....perfect!

[attachment=2:ld9gx2iw]Balance.JPG[/attachment:ld9gx2iw]

Refitted the wheel and I'll road test it when it stops raining. If I'm not 100% happy with it at speed, I'll take it off and take it to the shop for balancing. I have a M/C lift and air tools so it literally is just a 5 minute job to remove and refit the wheel but I'm quietly confident.

[attachment=0:ld9gx2iw]Sorted.jpg[/attachment:ld9gx2iw]
 

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Your rear tyre's end of life profile is the same as the two I've worn out.

Shall we say they've been fairly and squarely worn out?
 

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What pressure have you been running? I generally got far more than that from the rear. I run Metzlers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ErikDK - I'd be inclined to say UNFAIR and square! :D

MacDoc - I've been running 50psi in the rear as I heard that that preserved the tyre profile! Obviously not!

From now on and until I hear different, I'll be using the recommended tyre at the recommended pressure. :thumbup:
 

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In Europe and neighboring islands, we have much more stop-and-go riding due to dense traffic as well as much shorter stretches of road where we can maintain our speed before we have do slow down or stop at intersections or roundabouts.

3500 - 6000 km's (2200 - 3800 miles) is quite normal this side of the pond, very few riders get more than 4500 miles from a rear tire.
 

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ErikDK said:
In Europe and neighboring islands, we have much more stop-and-go riding due to dense traffic as well as much shorter stretches of road where we can maintain our speed before we have do slow down or stop at intersections or roundabouts.

3500 - 6000 km's (2200 - 3800 miles) is quite normal this side of the pond, very few riders get more than 4500 miles from a rear tire.

That"s terrible and I thought my getting 6K miles was bad when some in the U.S. get 10-12K.
 

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Nice having tire equipment to use, I have the same where I work at a local car dealer (former mechanic) and indeed that tire sidewall is a bit stiff isn't it.
 

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Nicely done, must be great having access to the right professional tools to get the job done, sure goes a lot faster...

Hand fitting the rear tire on the 650 is no fun... enjoy the nice equipment, I would if I could....

not sure if the new B-Stone SC is out yet, but somebody should give it a try to see if they have really
addressed the flat spot issue that is so prevalent with the older TH01RM.

previous thread: New Bridgestone Tires

 

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I may be wrong in this, and I expect to be challenged..........but I believe the tire compunds are different in the US compared to Europe as well, where the compromise between life and grip is set for local market conditions.

I.e. Eurpoeans are prepared to replace more often than in US, so a softer compound is used, increase grip at the cost of life. In the US, the opposite is true.

I know when riding in UK, I rarely got more out of a rear than 3,000 miles (5k-6K for a front), but easily surpass that here (and I'm heavier now!). Same holds true for car tires. Over there I'd expect to get around 30K from a set, over here, about twice that.
On the other hand, it's a lot easier to break them loose overher than there, be it cars or bikes.

I know, it's purely anecdotal, etc., etc., but just figured I'd through in my $0.02.
 

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I realize there are other factors at play, so FWIW, I'm on my 4th Bridgestone TH01RM and here's the mileage I've gotten from each prior:
1. 8k at 43 psi
2. 8k at 43 psi
3. 9k at 41 psi
 

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ajbecwar, you don't have your location in your profile so is that mileage on US tires or Europe tyres? How is one to know just by reading your post?
 

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I have been looking for the new Bridgestones SC, but have yet to find them.
Motorcycle ss still lists the older version. Maybe a call to bridgestone will help out
on their availability.
LeDude said:
Nicely done, must be great having access to the right professional tools to get the job done, sure goes a lot faster...

Hand fitting the rear tire on the 650 is no fun... enjoy the nice equipment, I would if I could....

not sure if the new B-Stone SC is out yet, but somebody should give it a try to see if they have really
addressed the flat spot issue that is so prevalent with the older TH01RM.

previous thread: New Bridgestone Tires

 

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I'm planning on mounting my replacement tires myself. I will need to make jigs to do it since I have no special tools. I wondered how I was going to balance it. Thanks for the idea on the old school way of balancing. I do have a couple of jack stands. If I can't do the job, then at least I can take the wheel off the bike and take it to the shop to mount and balance the tire. That will save me a bundle in itself I think. :roll:
 

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Chappy, look at this below. You just have to disregard the tire type going back on, just about any tire works this way.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=58631
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Update:

Finally got round to taking it out on the road today. Balancing perfect. I just cannot believe the difference in handling with a new 'round profile' tyre!! Much, much easier to turn and change direction. Even if it was legal, I don't think I could handle the flat profile of a Darkside tyre with my limited biking experience. I've done 20 miles so far on damp (in places) roads so I still have 40mm of chicken strips either side on the rear tyre. Another 1 or 2 mm and I'd have reached my limit anyway. :roll:
 

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+1 on using the jack stands and axle to balance the tire. The shop that remounted mine couldn't use their balancing equipment because of the size of the axle. I found out the hard way that the Harbor Freight bubble balancer wouldn't work for the same reason. The stand and axle worked great, with 1oz needed to balance the new off set valve stem I put on.

Thanks Dave; right information at the right time!
 

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Well I just finished a 1,480 mile ride with my Shinko bias in the rear and the stock BS radial on the front. Lots of curves, mountain highways and interstates at speeds of 75mph + at times. We would run about 100 miles between stops for fuel. The Shinko did a fine, fine, fine job! The scooter corners so well that you can't be too agressive enter the tight curves because it seems to really attack them. I am really pleased with the tire. Especially for the value. :thumbup:
 

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Chaplain KC said:
Well I just finished a 1,480 mile ride with my Shinko bias in the rear and the stock BS radial on the front. Lots of curves, mountain highways and interstates at speeds of 75mph + at times. We would run about 100 miles between stops for fuel. The Shinko did a fine, fine, fine job! The scooter corners so well that you can't be too agressive enter the tight curves because it seems to really attack them. I am really pleased with the tire. Especially for the value. :thumbup:
Hope the Shinko tire does better on a 650 then it did on my 400. Only got 5k from it on my 400 :(
 

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Ths Shinkos have worked extremely well for me, I average about 7-8k miles on the rear and about 13-15k miles on the front...

Have two spare sets sitting in the garage for the next tire changes....

As far as handling goes, it suites my needs and I have never had an issue with them in terms of handling, cornering etc...
in some ways I find them to be better than the OEM B-stones.
 
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