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Some interesting information to ponder. Register and download the report (PDF).

http://maids.acembike.org/


The Main Findings (courtesy of the MAIDS website)

Terms Used Below:
Powered Two Wheelers (PTWs)
Other Vehicle (OV)

The 921 on-scene, in-depth accident investigations have provided a large volume of data related to the general characteristics of PTW accidents; including accident causation and rider and passenger injury information. The outcome of these investigations can be considered in the identification, development and introduction of countermeasures.

The major findings of this study are as follows:

1. In 37% of cases, the primary accident contributing factor was a human error on the part of the PTW rider. In some situations, the human errors that occurred involved skills that were beyond those that typical drivers or operators might currently have. This is often due to the extreme circumstances of some of the accident cases, including an insufficient amount of time available to complete collision avoidance. (Sources: Tables 4.1, 5.23)

2. Among the secondary contributing factors, PTW riders failed to see the other vehicle (OV) and they also made a large number of faulty decisions, i.e., they chose a poor or incorrect collision avoidance strategy. In 13% of all cases, there was a decision failure on the part of the PTW rider. (Sources: Figure 4.1, Table C.5)

3. The number of cases involving alcohol use among the PTW riders was less than 5%, which is low in comparison to other studies, but such riders were more likely to be involved in an accident. (Source: Table 7.9)

4. In comparison to the exposure data, unlicenced PTW riders, illegally operating a PTW for which a licence is required, have a significantly increased risk of being involved in an accident. (Source: Table 7.5)

5. PTW riders between 41 and 55 years of age were found to be under-represented, suggesting that they may have a lower risk of being involved in an accident when compared to other rider age categories. (Source: Table 7.1)

6. When compared with the exposure data, 18 to 25 year old riders were found to be over-represented. (Source: Table 7.1)

7. In 50% of cases, the primary accident contributing factor was a human error on the part of the OV driver. (Source: Table 4.1)

8. OV drivers holding PTW licences were less likely to commit a perception failure than those without a PTW licence, i.e., they did not see the PTW or its rider. (Sources: Figure 7.8, Table C.17)

9. In about 1/3 of accidents PTW riders and OV drivers failed to account for visual obstructions and engaged in faulty traffic strategies. (Sources: Tables 4.11, 4.12, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6)

10. Traffic control violations were frequently reported, in 8% of the cases for PTW riders and in 18% for OV drivers. (Sources: Tables 6.10, 6.12)

11. Amongst the wide diversity of PTW accident and collision configurations that were observed in this study, not one configuration dominated. (Sources: Figure 3.4, Table C.4)

12. 90% of all risks to the PTW rider, both vehicular and environmental, were in front of the PTW rider prior to the accident. (Source: Figure 5.6)
:shock:

13. Among the primary contributing factors, over 70% of the OV driver errors were due to the failure to perceive the PTW. (Sources: Figure 4.1, Table C.5)

14. The roadway and OVs were the most frequently reported collision partner. In 60.0% of accidents, the collision partner was a passenger car. (Source: Table 3.4)

15. Tampering in order to increase performance was observed by visual inspection in 17.8% of all moped cases. This value is lower than those reported in other studies. The exposure study only shows 12.3% of tampering. (Source: Table 5.30)

16. Only modified conventional street motorcycles were found to be over-represented in the accident data. There was no evidence of an increased risk associated with riding any other PTW style. (Sources: Figure 5.1, Table C.6)

17. There were PTW technical problems in less than 1% of the accidents. Most of these were related to the tyres, illustrating the need for regular PTW inspections by the owner. There were no cases found by the teams in which an accident was caused by PTW design or manufacture. (Sources: Tables 4.1, 4.25, 4.26)

18. In over 70% of the cases the PTW impact speeds were below 50 km/h. (Source: Table 5.14)

19. In 18% of all cases, PTW travelling speeds were greater than or less than the surrounding traffic and this speed difference was considered to be a contributing factor. (Source: Table 4.13)

20. 73.1% of all PTW riders attempted some form of collision avoidance immediately prior to impact. Of these, 32% experienced some type of loss of control during the manoeuvre. (Source: Table 5.2)

21. 90.4% of the PTW riders wore helmets. However, 9.1% of these helmets came off the wearer?s head at some time during the accident, due to improper fastening or helmet damage during the accident. Overall, helmets were found to be an effective protective device to reduce the severity of head injuries. (Sources: Tables 9.5, 9.8, 9.11, 9.12)

22. 55.7% of PTW rider and passenger injuries were to the upper and lower extremities. The majority of these were minor injuries, e.g. abrasions, lacerations and contusions. Appropriate clothing was found to reduce, but not completely eliminate, many of these minor injuries. (Source: Figures 9.3, 9.13)

23. Roadside barriers presented an infrequent but substantial danger to PTW riders, causing serious lower extremity and spinal injuries as well as serious head injuries. (Source: Figure 6.1, Table C.9)

24. For PTW riders, a roadway maintenance defect caused the accident or was a contributing factor in 3.6% of all cases. (Source: Table 4.17)

25. For PTW riders, a traffic hazard caused the accident or was a contributing factor in 3.8% of all cases. (Source: Table 4.19)

26. Weather-related problems either caused the accident or contributed to accident causation in 7.4% of PTW accidents in the study. (Source:Table 4.23)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Powered Two Wheelers (PTWs)
Other Vehicle (OV)
 

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Interesting stats. Thanks.
 

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30MuleTeam said:
Some interesting information to ponder. Register and download the report (PDF).

http://maids.acembike.org/
Thanks for that link 30MuleTeam, I have registered and dowloaded - looks like I have some bedside reading! :read2:

PS:Where does the handle come from -30?
 

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Well I have ploughed through it. It does throw up things of interest.

I sort of get the feeling that although it was sponsored by the bike industry, it was done by people without an understanding of the biking environment.

Just as one example, I was most suprised that diesel fuel on the road was not even mentioned as a contributor to PTW accidents. I do know for a fact that in the UK it figures (UK not in the study) and our diesel vehicle population is much lower than mainland Europe (for fiscal reasons).

Still it is good to an overview of the situation and I am sure the trainers will be able to selectively extract and use as up to date material. It also providers a useful refresher for us all in our daily risk analysis out on the highway. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
NormanB said:
...I was most suprised that diesel fuel on the road was not even mentioned as a contributor to PTW accidents. I do know for a fact that in the UK it figures (UK not in the study) and our diesel vehicle population is much lower than mainland Europe (for fiscal reasons)...
They probably lumped diesel fuel into the "Other" category of roadway contaminants in table 6.5 (pg. 73). I was surprised about a few things also which probably means that some contributing factors will play a more prominant role depending on the region. Here in the US I can almost guarantee that speed and intoxication will be more prominant factors.

What really fascinates me is that 90% of all risks to the PTW rider, both vehicular and environmental, were in front of the PTW rider prior to the accident and that many of the crashes occurred anyway because of picking the incorrect avoidance tactic or a faulty execution of the avoidance tactic.

How many of us really have a strategy in mind when approaching an intersection or other potential hazardous situation? How many of us really practice avoidance skills like quick stops and swerving on a regular basis? These two things alone would probably have a significant effect on the frequency and severity of crashes.

The other statistic, that should come as no surprise, is the failure of other drivers to perceive the PTW rider. You can add headlight modulators, LED lights and colorful gear to help but you still have to drive defensively and watch out for the other guy.
 

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30MuleTeam said:
NormanB said:
...I was most suprised that diesel fuel on the road was not even mentioned as a contributor to PTW accidents. I do know for a fact that in the UK it figures (UK not in the study) and our diesel vehicle population is much lower than mainland Europe (for fiscal reasons)...
They probably lumped diesel fuel into the "Other" category of roadway contaminants in table 6.5 (pg. 73). I was surprised about a few things also which probably means that some contributing factors will play a more prominant role depending on the region. Here in the US I can almost guarantee that speed and intoxication will be more prominant factors.

What really fascinates me is that 90% of all risks to the PTW rider, both vehicular and environmental, were in front of the PTW rider prior to the accident and that many of the crashes occurred anyway because of picking the incorrect avoidance tactic or a faulty execution of the avoidance tactic.

How many of us really have a strategy in mind when approaching an intersection or other potential hazardous situation? How many of us really practice avoidance skills like quick stops and swerving on a regular basis? These two things alone would probably have a significant effect on the frequency and severity of crashes.

The other statistic, that should come as no surprise, is the failure of other drivers to perceive the PTW rider. You can add headlight modulators, LED lights and colorful gear to help but you still have to drive defensively and watch out for the other guy.
Yeah - that really is the 'killer' fact.

If you are going to assume anything - assume they ain't seen you. :wink:
 

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Very interesting data, will down load the PDF when I get home.

NormanB, with you on the diesel spills, our (UK) roads are lethal. By the way did you append your name to the deiselkills list that has been dotting around the interent over here?
 

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waspie said:
Very interesting data, will down load the PDF when I get home.

NormanB, with you on the diesel spills, our (UK) roads are lethal. By the way did you append your name to the deiselkills list that has been dotting around the interent over here?
Nope any chance of a link?
 
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