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alrighty then, just remember i am a poor country boy, i have heard several mentions of engine braking, is this something peculiar to the 650?,or is this something all scooter riders or mc riders can learn?,is this basically just in turns/curves?
 

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Engine braking is just the compression of the engine slowing you down when you are in gear and the throttle is closed. All motorcycles do it, and the amount of braking effect depends on what gear you are in. Lower gears have more braking effect. Standard transmission cars & trucks do it also. The Burgman 400 doesn't have as much, because the transmission setup is mechanical, and doesn't change ratio as much when you slow down. The transmission on the Burgman 650 is electronically controlled, and it does lower its ratio as you slow down - very similar to a motorcycle rider progressively downshifting as they are coming to a stop. The key to using it effectively is not to abruptly close the throttle unless you actually want maximum engine braking effect. Just gradually roll the throttle down to get the level of engine braking you want. It becomes second nature after a little practice.
 

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pauljo said:
...The key to using it effectively is not to abruptly close the throttle unless you actually want maximum engine braking effect...
Amen to that!

On my very first ride on 'Arnie' last Friday, I was surprised by the amount of engine braking that can be achieved by indelicate use of the throttle. I suspect that it might be all too easy to get wheel lock-up in some circumstances, as you might on so-called 'normal' sickles, especially those of a larger persuasion. :wink:

Smoothness has to be the order of the day.
 

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engine braking...it is a berry berry good thing :wink:

it did save my butt when i was asleep (uh... "at peace"...) at the switch. :oops: - (when I was new-ish to da pie...)

the "delicate touch" (i.e. the decelleration factor that chiefie referred to) biological "sensors" wear off after some miles though, and then you dont really notice it (sort of) and start to get used to it. But man, this thing is heavy, and, when all of a sudden, while you least expect it, the light turns red, you have to know how to grab a fist full of them brakes (uh - plural - "fists").

I had to stop 3 times hard today - hard. I said to meself....self, this is a huge scoot! :twisted:

The other 40+ stops were uneventful.

I like it - I like it - I like it! :)

Pete
 

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pauljo said:
Engine braking is just the compression of the engine slowing you down when you are in gear and the throttle is closed.
Just a technical note - engine braking is actually a function of the intake stroke rather than the compression stroke. The energy stored in the engine during compression is returned to the system during the subsequent power stroke - minus a small amount consumed by internal friction. Braking occurs when you close the throttle valve during intake, and the engine now tries to pull air through the closed plate - it takes considerably more work than when the throttle plate is open.

I know it's counter-intuitive, but if you study how engines breathe it becomes clearer!

Sorry for the inturruption - but the misunderstanding of engine braking is a pet peeve of mine, and I try to illuminate others whenever it's mentioned!
 

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pauljo said:
...The key to using it effectively is not to abruptly close the throttle unless you actually want maximum engine braking effect. Just gradually roll the throttle down to get the level of engine braking you want. It becomes second nature after a little practice.
This is one of my favorite features on the 650. Once you're used to it you have an amazing amount of control using just the throttle.

To amplify the braking (and accelerating) effect, go into Power Mode. It's great when going through the twisties and sweepers on mountain roads.

Coming in for a stop at my company's parking lot, I always hit the Power button when the "regular" bikers are around; it makes a nice, deep, if somewhat too quiet rumble as I glide in for a stop. 8)
 
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