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Denny,

Welcome to BurgmanUSA!

I would not want to eliminate the engine braking. It is extremely useful once you learn to work with it. If it bothers you when coming to a stop, just push the manual mode button. That will reduce the engine braking effect considerably, since it will lock the tranny in 3rd or 4th gear (depending on what speed you engage manual mode at).

Personally, I just keep a bit of throttle rolled on. Rather than shutting the throttle entirely, I just roll it down gradually until I'm ready to stop. I also have a bit of brake applied at the point where I close throttle and allow the clutch to disengage. This prevents the lurch forward when the clutch releases. The AN650 has no more engine braking than my motorcycle - it just requires a different technique to control it smoothly.
 

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Denny,

I agree with Pailjo RE carrying a little power when slowing down. I took me about 4,000 miles to really figue it out and get used to doing it. Closing the throttle Slowly, helps quite a bit.
 

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Engine braking is a good thing. It helps to slow the bike down therefore is easier on the brake pads. All motorcycles have engine braking and at times it's advantageous to shift down a gear or two while braking to increase the braking effect. There are often times when I will hit the power button to assist in braking in a hurry. I certainly would not like to go down a steep mountain road without some sort of engine braking! It may take some getting used to (you don't say how much motorcycling experience you have), but in time you'll agree that it was worth the effort.

Cheers,

Bob
 

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I also keep a little power on while slowing down. And, I touch the left brake very lightly a few times, just to flash the brake light at whoever might be following.
 

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When I rode Chickenman's bike in Hawai'i, the one thing I really found I missed was the engine braking.
Steve
 

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I think Paul best described the braking technique I use. It has become habit and now I don't even think about it.
In the twisties, the transmission and the engine braking makes for very smooth transitions between slowing and accelerating without having to constantly be on the brakes or shifting. I really like watching my riding buddies braking and shifting and generally working their butts off in the curves while I'm able to relax a little and enjoy the ride. They keep telling me that shifting is part of the "fun" - I think they're just trying to convince themselves. :D
Don
 

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DonRich90 said:
In the twisties, the transmission and the engine braking makes for very smooth transitions between slowing and accelerating without having to constantly be on the brakes or shifting. I really like watching my riding buddies braking and shifting and generally working their butts off in the curves while I'm able to relax a little and enjoy the ride. They keep telling me that shifting is part of the "fun" - I think they're just trying to convince themselves. :D
Don
This really came to light when I was riding Needles highway in the South Dakaota Black Hills this Summer. Tight (15 mph) curves, back to back hairpin curves - piece of cake on the AN650 in Power Mode. I remember thinking how much harder I would have been working if I had ridden my V-Strom.

Sometimes I do like to shift - so I ride the V-Strom. But that is a lot more fun in the higher speed, more gradual "sweeper" curves like in the Iowa Loess Hills. In the tight stuff, the AN650 rules!.
 

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It seems like most people have grown to favor the engine braking effect, but I have to confess, I wish there were a little less of it. If it weren't there at all, for those who would still like to have it, the manual mode should accomplish much the same thing.

I remember a column of Click and Clack (the Car Talk guys) quite a while back that I've never forgotten. Someone asked them if they thought it was appropriate to downshift an auto trans car manually to use engine braking; not on hills, but just under normal conditions. They said they recommended against it, saying it was cheaper to put on brake pads than it was to put in a new transmission. I have to wonder how much extra wear this puts on the AN650's drivetrain... and I have to say I'd rather put on brake pads a little more often than repairing the transmission. I've also noticed that the engine braking also seems to add to the little mini-backfires that occur occasionally when decelerating.

All told, I'm just not sold on it. I can live with it and have learned to adapt as others have, but I have to say at this point I'd rather it wasn't there. More perfectly, if there were a way perhaps for the dealer to reprogram it either on or off based on customer preference... that would be great. Or heck... just put a switch on the dash! :)

WLB :>)
 

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I'm very happy with the engine braking on the AN650. But, in deference to WLB's post, I'll tell a tale....

My Dad had an old Saab car. One of the ugly-as-sin, 2-stroke, three cylinder models. Built like a tank, very heavy steel. It had a four speed manual transmission with the shifter on the steering column. It was a very weird car.

On the floorboard, there was a lever that you could move with your foot. In one position, the engine was engaged for normal engine braking. In the other position, the car would freewheel. If you took your foot off the gas in "freewheel" mode, the engine would drop down to idle. If you were going 70 mph, you were effectively riding in an enclosed roller skate. Press the gas, the engine would rev up, there'd be a little clunk when it reached transmission speed, and you'd start accelerating.

It used to scare me when my Dad went into freewheel mode. Just wasn't normal. I had driven manual transmissions since I was a kid, and they are supposed to have engine braking. This car defied every standard of normalness - probably why they weren't very popular back then. However, my Dad loved it because it got great mileage. Heck, he was running at idle most of the time, with just short bursts of acceleration in between. :shock:

So... It has been done before - a choice between engine braking and no engine braking.

My take on the issue though, is that the engine braking bothers folks who have lived with automatic transmission cars most or even all of their lives. For those who have driven manual transmission cars and motorcycles, it is pretty normal to work with engine braking.
 

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WLB :>) said:
I remember a column of Click and Clack (the Car Talk guys) quite a while back that I've never forgotten. Someone asked them if they thought it was appropriate to downshift an auto trans car manually to use engine braking; not on hills, but just under normal conditions. They said they recommended against it, saying it was cheaper to put on brake pads than it was to put in a new transmission. I have to wonder how much extra wear this puts on the AN650's drivetrain...
Very little, if any, wear should result from engine braking. It is a CVT transmission - not actually shifting gears like the car automatics. It is simply varying pulley diameters - not much stress involved with that.

WLB :>) said:
I've also noticed that the engine braking also seems to add to the little mini-backfires that occur occasionally when decelerating.
I love it when it makes those sounds... Motorcycle big twins and singles are supposed to do that - my V-Strom is even more vocal on decelleration. Part of their character. I'm just not ready for a bike that sounds like a Buick. :wink:
 

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When I bought my AN650 I bought it from the dealer sight unseen; I was trading in an AN400 that I liked, but I knew I'd have to have the full boat and wouldn't be satisfied until I had it.

And I certainly haven't regretted my decision. The AN400 doesn't have the engine braking that the AN650 does, but the AN650 has that smooth-as-butter engine (except for the mini-backfires) and power galore. All told, I'm *extremely* happy with my 650. I do have this *scooter* complex, though... I wish it *looked* like a regular motorcycle, with the bigger tires, etc. I hope Suzuki at some point decides to offer this tranny on other motorcyles in their line... wouldn't that be cool?

Being a novice rider, as far as I'm concerned the auto tranny is an important safety factor... I don't have to worry about shifting gears and dropping the clutch so I can concentrate more on low speed maneuvering. I have no problems driving manuals... heck, I've had several cars, especially in my youth, that had sticks... but a car and a motorcycle are two different things.

BTW, I just passed 2,000 miles on my AN650 and it's starting to loosen up a good bit... it seems faster than ever. Unfortunately, I live in No. IN and it's starting to get cold. So I bought fleece-lined jeans. I'm going to ride until the snow flies!!! :)
 

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WLB :>) said:
Being a novice rider, as far as I'm concerned the auto tranny is an important safety factor... I don't have to worry about shifting gears and dropping the clutch so I can concentrate more on low speed maneuvering. I have no problems driving manuals... heck, I've had several cars, especially in my youth, that had sticks... but a car and a motorcycle are two different things.
Learning to shift gears on a motorcycle is no more difficult than when you first learned to shift gears on a car. It takes some practice but you'd learn very quickly (just ask any of our novice riders who took the MSF Course). After a short while it becomes "2nd nature", just like with your cars, and it doesn't intrude on the operation of the bike. That said, I LOVE my automatic! :D
Don
 

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WLB :>) said:
...if there were a way perhaps for the dealer to reprogram it either on or off based on customer preference... that would be great. Or heck... just put a switch on the dash! :)
It wouldn't be an easy task. The engine braking effect is there because the engine is coupled to the drive system until you are below a given speed -- around 8MPH for me.

To eliminate the engine braking you'd have to install some sort of clutch system to release the coupling at higher speeds.

Far easier just to get used to gradually rolling off the throttle instaed of chopping it completely. It only takes a few hundred miles in the saddle and then it becomes an unconscious and natural response -- if you learn to "accept" the Burgman's ways, instead of trying to force it to be something it's not.
 

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It wouldn't be an easy task. The engine braking effect is there because the engine is coupled to the drive system until you are below a given speed -- around 8MPH for me.

To eliminate the engine braking you'd have to install some sort of clutch system to release the coupling at higher speeds.
Have you ever ridden the AN400? It doesn't have the engine braking, operating like every other "scooter" on the market. I have to respectfully disagree... I don't think it would be that difficult at all to eliminate the engine braking. It's all in how the computer is programmed.

WLB :>)
 

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WLB :>) said:
Have you ever ridden the AN400? It doesn't have the engine braking, operating like every other "scooter" on the market.
I haven't ridden the 400; but I used to own a CH125 and a CH250, and I test rode a Silverwing.

Engine braking on a smaller displacement, single cylinder bike would be less noticable than on a 650 because of the power:weight ratio on the 650, but unless my memory fails me it was still there to some degree.

WLB :>) said:
...I don't think it would be that difficult at all to eliminate the engine braking. It's all in how the computer is programmed.
I don't know that the "problem" is in the computer. I think the point at which the clutch on the 650 disengages is predicated on a mechanical lock-up, just like "every other 'scooter' on the market." I could be wrong, but I don't think I am.

I suppose Suzuki could put more powerful springs in the clutch, so it would release sooner, but I'm not sure I would want to be riding a 607 pound bike that was free-wheeling down a hill, relying wholly on the brakes to keep me from careening out of control.

No sir. I'll take my Burgmans just the way the are, please.
 

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No sir. I'll take my Burgmans just the way the are, please.
I'm not suggesting the feature should be removed wholesale; I realize a lot of people appreciate the feature, and I also realize there are tangible benefits to having it, such as rolling down the hill, as you mentioned.

All I'm saying is I wish it could be optionally selected rather than forced.

WLB :>)
 

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WLB :>) said:
All I'm saying is I wish it could be optionally selected rather than forced.
Well,Suzuki has now added electric mirror folders, an elecrical windshield adjuster, and "overdrive" to the 650s; maybe an electric clutch is technologically feasable and will be added at some point -- on Japanese and European models only, of course. :evil:
 

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I had minor issues about the engine braking when I first got the 650. Like most others, I have adapted by gradually rolling off the throttle. In fact it has become so second nature, I never even gave it a thought until reading this post. Same thing with my Honda Foreman 450 ES ATV. It has various characteristics that I adapted very well to and now use them to great advantage. All machines are different. Most of the time people adapt to them without even thinking about it. This is especially true in cars. The only difference here is the B-650 engine braking is a more pronounced characteristic.
I've come to like the controlled decelleration. So yeah, I'll take mine just as it is - thank you.
While not perfect, Suzuki executed this bike very well.
 
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