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I read the posts about checking the valves on the 400 and boy what a royal PIA that seems to be. I'm not sure what I'll do when it's time for me to check the 650 - probably pay to have it done.

But, that made me think of a question I've thought about for a while. What bike or scooter is the easiest to maintain ? Oil changes on most 2 wheelers is no big deal and I'm not talking heavy repairs, just the regular valves, belts stuff.

I've had bike motors down to the case and fixed all kinds of parts inside but that was years ago when I had time, patience and no money. Now, I'd like to have a second bike or scoot I could easily maintain myself without a lot of effort.

Thoughts ? Opinions ? Ideas ? Anyone ? Anyone ? Bueller ?
 

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The last bike I did all that stuff on was an air cooled BMW twin. Valves were easy, but I burned myself on hot exhaust a couple of times trying to remove the oil filter cover which was nestled between the exhaust headers. Just like cars, as bikes get more high tech it gets harder to do it all yourself. Some motorcycles are just as hard or harder to do maintenance on than the Burgmans. But I buy a bike to ride - not to do maintenance on.
 

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pauljo said:
But I buy a bike to ride - not to do maintenance on.
Absolutely BUT (you knew there was a but! LOL ) I'd like a 2nd bike not only to have around but to show my sons how to do some of the work. They don't ride but they could learn a lot about cars from working on bikes. I'm thinking something like a moped or a 150cc. My hope is they also might get interested in riding if I had something small around. They're a bit intimidated by the B'Man's size. So, several reasons why a small, easy to maintain 2nd bike would be good to have.
 

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As far as the Burgman's go there are some of us that have switched , so they would know which is harder to service.
For me one of the easiest bikes to service was my BMW cruiser -once you got the tank off every thing was right there, and engine work was straight forward..
I am sure there must be easer bikes to work on, I just never owned them. :)
 

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Easy to Maintain Bike

Try a Suzuki GS-250. A little one lunger with heart, everythings is pretty accessible and they haven't changed it for many years, so plenty of folks know how and can help. The only drawback I can see is the exhaust pipes ride lower than the bottom of the frame, making it a lot of work to put on a lift or jack. I had a block setup on the Sears lift, and if you positioned it just right.....oh well.

Question-I can't seem to make my centerstand work on my 650. I've tried a bezillion times, the peg will drag but it never seems to catch and "buck up." I've been able to do it at the dealer on other bikes, just not this one. I looked carefully at the "legs" of the stand while it was being held upright-looks like they aren't parallel, that is, one leg actually touches the ground about a half inch before the other, when the bike is held vertical and the centerstand pushed down with a foot. Am I an idiot or what?
 

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Franklin - I agree with your suggestion on the GS250. Though "teaching" point gap may involve an older type bike - they made GS250s with points right!?

In so far as the center stand thing goes, mine involves a firm grip on the port pillion grab handle (which has a cheapish sort of "give" to it) along with a pretty good "stand on it" maneuver to get the thing to jack up on its center stand. I'm "only" 197 lbs and it takes almost a full second. It certainly doesn't feel light, teetering about especially while I'm feeling around with my right foot for the centerstand jack lever. I would think that if your center stand legs are bent or somehow or another tweaked, it would make this not-that-darn-easy, takes-some-confidence-and-practice "move" even more daunting.
 

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Franklin check to make sure you havent lost one of the center stand mounting bolts. This has happened to a few of us and it does make it a little harder with this one bolt missing.
 

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Re: Easy to Maintain Bike

Franklin said:
...Question-I can't seem to make my centerstand work on my 650. I've tried a bezillion times, the peg will drag but it never seems to catch and "buck up."
The 650 is a REALLY heavy monster. It takes a little practice, then it'll be easy.

Assuming all the bolts are in place: with the side-stand down for safety, stand on the left of your bike facing forward. Make sure the parking brake is OFF. Put your right foot on the center-stand pedal, facing forward. Right hand on the pillion-rail, left hand on the left handlebar squeezing the brake.

Stand up on the pedal, and as you do release the brake and give a rearward pull with both hands. The bike should "magically" rise up on the center-stand. Now set the parking brake so the rear wheel doesn't spin at idle, and you're set.

That's how I do it. Others may have other ways.

HTH.
 

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For ease of use, and teaching someone new - I'd go with a 50cc scooter like a Yamaha Zuma (I have one), or the more expensive Vespa. I like the Zuma because it is more durable than mopeds, or the Honda Metro or the Yamaha Vino - and it rides well on dirt roads and trails. The Vespa is nicer, but it's heavier, and doesn't fare well offroad. The little scooters will let them get up to about 40mph - and I think that's fast enough for kids to use until they buy their own.
 

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One of the reasons I went with the Majesty 400 is that its first valve check/adjustment is called for at 26,500 miles. On top of that, the top of the motor is exposed in just a couple of minutes without taking off any of the body work. This is accomplished by them engineering a small panel in the underseat storage compartment. Simply remove the carpet, four bolts and the top of the motor is right there. Spark plug changes will be a snap, too. As for oil and other items, no body work is removed for those procedures. The coolant filler is under the floorboard runner, just peel it off, open the resevoir and pour in. As for the belt, I have no idea how difficult that will be, but I hope Yamaha made that easy too.
 

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The absolute easiest bike I have ever seen to maintain is the mid 80's Honda Nighthawk S. Air cooled (no coolant to change) Hydraulic valves (no valve adjustments) automatic cam chain adjust (no belt or tensioner) and shaft drive (no chain or belt).

Just change the oil and ride. An air filter every now and again and if you'r really anal, sync the four carbs.

That's it...
 
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