Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do the earplugs cut down on your ability to hear things, like horns, sirens, etc acceptably? I'm only on my second day of riding 1.5 hours (one way) to work, and have found myself leaning forward crotch-rocket style just to get out of the wind noise. The wind itself isn't bad with the butt-stop adjusted properly, and with the visor on my full-face Bel helmet up, the wind noise is totally acceptable. But with the visor up, things can hit me in the face, and I end up being annoyed at the wind in my eyes (though my presecription glasses undoubtably help). Keeping the visor open just a notch or two from "closed" seems to be an acceptable compromise, but it'd still be more comfy if I could lean back 'n straighten up a bit more.

I have some of the "three ring" kind of fancy earplugs from AO Safety, and I think they're better than the foam ones with letting some noise in. I don't wanna buy a new windshield, or really buy anything else expensive, so a new helmet with active noise cancelation is out of the question. :) Other suggestions will be entertained.

Thanks. Off to the "search" again, in case this is asked often...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
No. Wear them whenever you are traveling on teh scooter for more than 15 minutes or so. You risk permanent hearing damage if you don't, and then your ability to hear everything will be reduced.

When ears are exposed to a lot of noise for a long time, like wind around the helmet, they tense up and aactually hear less. You can experience the effect that it takes a while for your ears to "rebound" after you stop riding. So, odd as it may sound, to keep them relaxed and able to hear stuff, put in ear plugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've already got a little bit of hearing loss due to some other "dumb youth tricks" (I used to be into car stereos more than I am now). I guess I'll try the ear plugs out, then. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
Take a ride and actually listen for "emergency" sounds. In my area those sounds are very rare. Even more rare is one coming you way. If one IS coming my way I can tell by it's lights, the other cars pulling over, or the fast approaching image in my rear view mirror. I have a deaf brother who has never heard a siren or horn, but he drives safely all the time.

My point? Wear hearing protection if the noise generated by wind around your helmet bothers you. It will greatly contribute to the longevity of your hearing, and only minutely affect your ability to ride safely. Just do what you're supposed to do and drive safely. Keep your eyes on the traffic all around and you'll spot the emergencies.

Dave B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I live relatively close to a hospital, as well as between a fire department and college. I'd imagine that I hear those noises more often than "normal" because of that. :)

Rare or not, it just takes one to cause a problem. My car rarely catches on fire, but I still carry a fire extenguisher, for example.

I'll probably be safer with earplugs, though, because that should let me sit back in the position my mirrors are adjusted for, rather than leaning forward where I have to shift a little to see behind me. Or maybe I could try to find a quieter helmet - I got the Bel because of their large presence in various auto racing circles, not because I've heard so much about people using them on cycles. Earplugs sure are cheaper, though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,166 Posts
I had the same problem you do. I got the laminar lip and that seemed to help some but not enough. I got the Givi windscreen and the problem all but went away. I would still recommend the ear plugs and it's a fact you can still hear with them, in most cases better because the roar of the wind is lessened. Pilots use ear plugs all the time and still carry on air to ground conversations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I strongly urge you to try wearing earplugs. As others have mentioned, they will protect your ears from serious damage, but not only that, you'll have a far more relaxing ride. You'll be surprised at the difference!

Cheers,

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
Are the ventilation holes on top of your helmet open or closed? Is the wind noise really that loud? Maybe I've already killed my ears already? To me it isn't very loud at all.

Anyway, I'm sure wearing earplugs won't affect your ability to hear emergency sirens and horns, but I like being able to hear the sound of engines and tires of other vehicles as they approach me in other lanes. I find that my full face helmet already muffles out some of that sound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Yep, I'm amazed at the stuff I can hear with earplugs in. They're great for filtering out unwanted sounds though, like wind- and turbulence-generated noise.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Earplugs

I have spent my days for the last 17 years living in a dump truck & have worn ear plugs for about 16 of those years. Wore the foam type until last year when I ran across the yellow 3-ring AO Safety plugs. They are SO much more comfortable I'm still amazed at the difference. There are 5 radios in my truck...3 of them with microphones attached. The earplugs filter out the overall diesel truck noise. I can still hear what I need to hear well enough. Don't hesitate to use those earplugs. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Stargazer, probably one of the reasons why the noise doesn't bother you as much is because of your short windscreen. When I was riding the Savage I never had the problem with noise around my ears as I do the B400. The stock shield moves a lot of air around which seems to move right past my ears with incredible noise.

Duster, where did you find those 3 ring AO Safety plugs? I have trouble trying to keep the foam ones in my ear so I usually don't where plugs.

Evelyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Have you ever had ringing ears after a highway ride? If you do then start wearing ear plugs. I thought I could handle it but I can't. Since then I've been exploring helmets as well. As far as I know there is only one helmet on the market that boast noise reduction and its not available in Canada or the USA. The System 5 helmet from BMW was specifically designed for 83 db rating. Go to the website and check it out. The european standards EC 22.05 for helmets in Europe supposely is an even better and realistic standard for helmet performance and I am glad to see someone is thinking about the noise in the design.n Also I tried on the latest Schubert helmet (European design) and found it deadening outside sound. Just my perception but I will consider this helmet good and even better if earplugs are worn. Sirens and horns from other vehicles can be heard but obviously not as well. Most earplugs will have Noise Reduction (NR) ratings on them so the set I commonly use have 28 DB NR ratings.

I so happen to work at the university here in Vancouver and have access to noise dosimeters. Recently we purchase these small units that would data log noise measurement and so I took and couple of the units and blasted down the highway with them inside my helmet. The readings at 70 mph (120 kph) inside the helmet was over 110 decibels. I was astounded! No wonder I was getting ringing in my ears after a high speed ride. There are exposure maximums as well as maximum exposure times that will determine if you are potentially harming your hearing.

This was prior to breaking in the 650 and so it was the first short term burst at high speed I had ever done. First things I noticed that the stock shield appears to contribute to the noise.

So afterwards, I started wearing the plugs no matter how short the rides were and changed my helmet. No more ringing. Just find and brand the fits well and is comfortable and start wearing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Stargazer said:
Are the ventilation holes on top of your helmet open or closed? Is the wind noise really that loud? Maybe I've already killed my ears already? To me it isn't very loud at all.

Anyway, I'm sure wearing earplugs won't affect your ability to hear emergency sirens and horns, but I like being able to hear the sound of engines and tires of other vehicles as they approach me in other lanes. I find that my full face helmet already muffles out some of that sound.
The vent holes don't make a difference - in fact, I've gotta lean forward and up to get the top vents into the wind enough to where I can feel air blowing in. I don't know if my height has anything to do with it or not - probably does.

I'll try the earplugs today and see how it goes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,411 Posts
pauljo said:
...I recently bought the Hearos Water Protection plugs, which are triple ring. ...
I also have the Hearos. I carry them in my pocket all the time. (They came in handy at a really loud movie last weekend.)

Any time I know I'm going to be on the highway for more than 15 or 20 minutes I put them in.

Stargazer said:
...Is the wind noise really that loud? Maybe I've already killed my ears already? To me it isn't very loud at all. ...
As was mentioned above, having the short screen you actually get less wind noise than many of us. Having the screen's edge anywhere between mid-chest height and chin height can set up some real buffeting around the helmet, and that's where a lot of the noise comes from.

A few weeks ago, as a test, I stood up while going 60 MPH, and the noise level dropped dramatically. I was amazed at how much better I could hear my engine and the sounds of my tires. Leaning down behind my windshield has a similar effect, but I'm so tall that if I lean down like that I can't see where I'm going very well. Getting a Clearview XXL windshield seems like a good investment, noise abatement-wise.

You might have problems with noise, even on the Type-S, once you start riding at freeway speeds. Wearing earplugs is an investment in your ears' future. You just have to be extra diligent in doing head checks and mirror checks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
I like the three ring plugs better than the foam ones. As I previously said they are easier to insert and remove. But they also do not block out quite as much sound. I'm more comfortable with the 25db noise suppression that they have. But I still have a problem with wearing them for very long. After two or three hours of wearing either type of ear plug, my ear canals start to get sore. Due to that, I don't wear them much.

Has anyone else had this problem? Is it something that would improve if I wore them more often? Maybe my ear canals would get more used to them? Or do I need to get custom earplugs fitted? Just curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
Many midwesterners condition their ear canals for plugs by sticking a finger in their ear and twirling it around whenever they are asked a question.



Cheers.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top