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Discussion Starter #1
I am a new owner of a 650 (2008 exec) with 3,300 miles on it. I had a 2007 Burgman 400 for 4 plus years and moved up to the bigger version of the Burgman. I am not used to the downshifting it does as I slow for a turn or a stoplight or stop sign. It really almost jerks some. Is this normal??? I have no idea. Thanks!
 

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Yes. You need to learn to be a little gentle on the throttle, both accelerating and decelerating. The 650 is not like the 400 that just coasts for a long while; it has significant engine braking. Make sure its not in Power mode. That exaggerates the engine braking.
 

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You eventually get used to the 650's necessary throttle control. I bought mine from a dealer 150 miles away and thus had a fair trial run, but halfway I stopped for a rest at a Motorway car-park and rode across it in hopping jerks with people watching (I wanted to skulk off stage left with a red face). But like I said, you soon get the hang of it.
 

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#1 take off gently without a lot of throttle , the bike will climb to speed and you won't have to let off the throttle which produces that deceleration jerk .

#2 get used to using the throttle almost like a brake , when you see a stop coming up gently decelerate with the throttle . never just let off the throttle completely , keep a little pressure on it all the time , if you suddenly have to grab a hand full of brake for an unexpected stop , then just let off the throttle at the same time you are grabbing those brakes

#3 try to forget every thing you've learned about throttling a motorcycle , then begin treating your 650 like an electric bike and the throttle is a rheostat .

#4 remember this word GENTLY GENTLY GENTLY GENTLY GENTLY

At first you will think WTF did I get myself into now , but be patient and you will get used to it . If you don't and want to sell it I will give you $1,000 for it :D

TheReaper!
 

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Use the throttle like a rheostat you would use on electrical equipment. Turn it one way to increase speed and the other to slow down. It works great for me and I don't have to use my brakes much at all. I have always downshifted my motorcycles and I like it that my Burgman does it automatically for me while I still have to do it myself on my V-Star. Larger grips make it easier and grip puppies are the cheapest and easiest way to go but the grips on mine (see below) are great.
 

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I find it interesting that the DSG transmission in my Jetta reacts almost exactly like my Burgman transmission. Both have three modes - auto - sport/power - and manual. The DSG down-shifts exactly like the Burgman - more aggressive when in sport/power mode with a higher shift point when accelerating. The parallels are very similar. The DSG trans is an automated 6 speed manual transmission with dual clutches so the similarities end when the mechanics of the two are examined. I'm still amazed that the Jetta almost gets as good a mileage figures as the Burgman. 40-42mpg vs 46-48mpg.
 

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You eventually get used to the 650's necessary throttle control.
Two things: one, why is the throttle control/ engine braking "necessary"

2- I got tried of my wrist always being in a strained position easing on and off the throttle ..... So I just put the o-ring cruise control on and leave it on ALL the time. Makes the throttle much more predictable. I did this after almost hitting my HVAC unit one morning as I was turning by it on damp grass. No more lurching forward and easier to throttle down gradually. You need to close the throttle aggressively when stopping fast but not a biggie. Works for me. YMMV


Sirkitride
 

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I find it interesting that the DSG transmission in my Jetta reacts almost exactly like my Burgman transmission. .....
But the VW DSG has the advantage of being re-programmable by third-party experts, who can give you whatever shift pattern you prefer. In my case, that would be zero engine braking, until the brake was touched.

The Burgman E-CVT can be partly changed by using a SpeedoHealer only for the CVT-controller, but you can't do anything about its blatant refusal to go under 3k RPM except from in the lowest gear.

Only from the 2013 model forwards, the Suzuki engineers have discovered that it's OK to let the engine pull below 3k RPM at city speeds, yielding a noticeably better fuel economy, as far as the owners report.
 

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Besides the engine braking, all my 650 Burgmans have never "DOWNSHIFTED" unless I was in manual mode then YES toggling the downshift button gives a harsh downshift 3rd to 2nd and 2nd to 1st. But in manual mode and let to down shift by itself it does have a bit harder shift than auto or power mode. I have never felt a true downshift in auto or manual mode, just the RPM's drop as the bike slows down but no jerking.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everyone, thanks for the feedback. I'm getting better at it as I drive it. The fact of the matter is it's going to take me some time to learn the habits of the 400. You definitely actively use the throttle more around town with the 400. I just needed to know what I was feeling with the 650 was normal,or not. Thanks.
 
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