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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Teaching my grandson to drive, I gave him, what I thought sage advice; you can profile the other drivers by what they drive. Sports cars are more than likely going to be driven aggressively; Prious, not so much. That sort of thing. It's not 100% correlation, to be sure, but some behavioral inferences can be deduced.

A little bit later we approached an intersection and a sports coupe was waiting in the on coming left hand turn lane. I told him to cover his brake because the car was going to turn left in front of us, sure enough, he did. The grandson was impressed by my premonition. I'm not sure if it was strictly the type of car or maybe a small movement he made, but there was a tell I could perceive.

Okay, I know its not a science or even close to accurate, but do you profile vehicles? If so, what are your findings? What car types do you avoid or watch out for?
 

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All :D
 

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At one time I feel that sports cars were driven by younger aggressive drivers. Not so much any more. Now, by the time most men can afford to drive a sports car they are in their 50's. So your ideas about classing drivers by type of car needs to be modified by who is driving them. Young guys = aggressive drivers, old farts = less aggressive drivers. This doesn't hold true for all drivers but works for me as a general guide.

Doug from Kentucky
 

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I typically profile by how they drive. Best predictor of future behavior is past performance.

And then there's the BMW (automotive) drivers...
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I typically profile by how they drive. Best predictor of future behavior is past performance.

And then there's the BMW (automotive) drivers...
Lol, my point exactly. It just stands to reason that those with aggressive driving styles, would choose a car that that can meet their requirements.

And it's not limited to sports cars. My dad used to tell me to watch out for large pickup drivers. Im Not getting down on all pickup drivers, but in LA, they are generally driven by men, men that like the power of a full size truck. And they use it.

Luxury cars are more often than not, driven by successful people and successful people generally don't get to be successful by being timid. Etc, etc.

I'm not trying to draw absolutes here or point fingers, just want to show tendencies that hopefully we can all utilize to keep ourselves safer. This is meant as a positive learning exercise.

So chime in. What can we learn from your experience?
 

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I always pre-judge drivers by what their car is or by what kind of condition it's in, they even teach you to do that in the MSF courses here. If your car is dirty and banged up I will give you lots of leeway and keep a closer eye on you until there is enough distance between us for me to relax a bit. Mini vans are another big problem since they are mainly driven by someone who is completely distracted by what is going on with kids in the vehicle and probably sleep deprived as well from the stresses of working and running a family. I also notice that a lot of guys who drive mini vans drive aggressively as if they have to compensate for being forced to drive a mini van. I also keep an eye on any performance car that is not a classic muscle car and don't even get me started talking about the hyper aggressive "Mixed Martial Art/Tap Out/Bad Boy" types who drive the huge pick-up trucks with pit bulls in the back! Where I live we have a type of early warning system, all drivers in training have to have an "L" sticker on the rear of the car and all new drivers must show an "N" sticker on theirs so at least from behind you can steer clear of these cars before they do something stupid to you. I'll probably get flamed for this but the town I live in is extremely dangerous since we have more than 1000 new immigrants moving in every month and some of them have never lived in a car culture and do the craziest things while learning how to go from a pedestrian/public transportation mindset to piloting a 4000lb vehicle in heavy traffic where all of the signs are in a strange language. Then there is another percentage that are skilled/experienced drivers but they learned to drive/survive in a no road rules/anything goes environment so they bring all kinds of havoc to any road that they drive on. Another problem that I have on the southern border of where I live is the retired drivers who are trying to keep their mobility but are constantly in the papers for mistaking the gas and brake pedals, taking turns too wide, driving too slow, making random turns etc. etc. etc. Maybe I have to buy an armored personal carrier so no-one can hurt me? If I could get a big enough one I could put the scooter inside with me, drive out into the country to where the riding is safer and then have only the deer, coyotes, raccoons, and skunks to look out for!
 

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I have one simple rule after many years of driving in all sorts of traffic.
"Trust no one!" My Drivers Ed. teacher taught us to focus on 5 sets of vehicles, to the rear, to the left, to the right, to the front and farther to the front. It has been successful so far!
Y'all ride safe!
 

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I don't judge by the model as much as by the condition/mods done to it and then by how the driver/rider acts. For instance there is a Prius here with flames painted on it and the driver pushes it to it's limits, some rich kid. I also know a guy with a Corvette but he is super careful with his baby and never drives it hard{a waste in a way}.
 

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Land Rover and BMW drivers world wide are the most aggressive according to the most recent report. :rolleyes:
 

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Watch the front wheels all the time, watch the drive and yes any modified car.
But the erratic ones that are hardest to predict are the distracted ones grrrrr
 

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I assume they're all idiots and they're all out to kill me. The ones that really worry me are the distracted yuppie SUVs and the garbage piles that probably never had brake maintenance coming up behind me. Some of the best advice I got from the MSF course was "always have an escape route" when stopped.

Since I assume they're all idiots, I'm pleased at times when I see actual competence on the roads. It's rare but it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I assume they're all idiots and they're all out to kill me. The ones that really worry me are the distracted yuppie SUVs and the garbage piles that probably never had brake maintenance coming up behind me. Some of the best advice I got from the MSF course was "always have an escape route" when stopped.

Since I assume they're all idiots, I'm pleased at times when I see actual competence on the roads. It's rare but it happens.
+1. Don't know if its legal else where or even here for that matter, but in CA cops don't bother you for filtering through the traffic at stop lights. I hate waiting in line for someone to rear end me. Get to the front, then get out front. I'd much rather deal with the very occasional open door, than 2 tons of steel barreling at me from behind.
 

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I keep an eye on everyone but I watch the beaters extra special. The ones with smashed front ends demand special attention - either they are tail gaters or have bad brakes - or both.

Someone mentioned women with kids. I would have been the 'filling' in a car sandwich had I not kept an eye on a woman in a small car directly behind me with a kid in the back seat and talking on a cell phone! Traffic was stop and go - I watched her turn around several times to attend to the kid while she was rolling! She appeared to be paying more attention to the phone and the kid than her driving. Traffic in front of me accordioned to a stop - I pulled out into the two way left turn lane just before she made a panic stop just short of the car I was behind! She stopped right beside me with a look of horror on her face - knowing she dodged a big one because of my paying attention. I yelled at her to put the effing phone down and pay attention to driving - which she immediately did. Then she gestured to me to pull out in front of her - I declined of course. Once was enough for me thank you very much. This was in about 2002 or so.

Washington State has since outlawed talking on a phone while driving unless you use a hands free device. I see no difference - you are distracted while driving regardless - someone is demanding half your attention either way. Driving demands more attention than some people can muster up if thats all they are doing. Add more distraction and you add more danger for everyone.

I ride with the rear view mirrors almost as much as I do looking ahead when someone is behind me. Get too close and I'll give you a warning gesture. After that I slow down (slowly - I never brake hard! Dumb thing to do!) to accommodate the distance the idiot behind me thinks is appropriate - I think the rule of thumb is 10mph per car length. They generally just back off. If they appear to be aggressive I pull over and gesture for them to pass. One of my biggest pet peeves is tail gaters. They are dangerous and stupid. The biggest offenders for tail gating is generally people operating high seat vehicles - pickup trucks and large SUV's.
 
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Washington State has since outlawed talking on a phone while driving unless you use a hands free device. I see no difference - you are distracted while driving regardless - someone is demanding half your attention either way.
not true

If it was you would see a huge increase in accidents just as there has been a huge increase in cell phone use

It's the physical act of holding a phone to the ear that is the major issue not the chatting

People in critical situations such as pilots do just fine as long as they have headsets on.

There is some evidence that chatting keeps you more alert and awake just like a passenger can do. Otherwise your mind tends to drift as driving it mostly an automatic function for all but new drivers.

I'm sure we've all arrived at a destination with little memory of the driving to get there.

But try and jot down an address, hold a phone to the ear, text etc and it all goes to **** in a handbasket.

We can process voice nav easily, but hard to concentrate at all on visual nav.

Like walking and other quasi-autonomic activities we don't "think" about driving.....new drivers sure do but experienced drivers don't - they are alert to the unusual not the usual.

New drivers are flustered as they try to cope with a barrage on inputs and can often miss the risks presented to them as they are concentrating on the basics - staying in lane etc that an experienced driver/rider does without conscious thought.

Like riding a bike and even like piloting a plane, once you are trained and comfortable it sticks and even after a long layoff comes back quickly.

If anything accidents have shown a drop as cell phones have increased and much of that may be due to less trying to read maps and addresses while driving and the reporting of drunk or erratic driving by other drivers and dangerous road conditions.....I've reported several myself.

I just say "dial OPP" in my hands free and I go straight to a police operator....and they appreciate it.

Nothing like a good chat with my daughter to make the miles go by and me awake on a long drive....I just say "Call Meghan" into the headset.

And if I have to navigate a tricky intersection I just tell her to wait a minute and get through the part that requires some concentration.

You cannot legislate common sense....and there is too little of that on the road.
YOU are the pilot/rider in command...up to you to assess your condition be it tired, or angry ( not good ) or sleepy ( pull off and nap ) etc.

There have been days I wanted to ride and simply knew I was too tired to do so safely.

Even tonight out watching for a non-starter meteor shower....I was mildly hypothemic so did not undertake the hour long drive home before getting warmed up at a late night eatery....tea and a bagel...now I'm warm and alert and ready to drive home.

While we all have to deal with idjits out there ( even tonight after midnight on a deserted road I get tail gated by a yahoo likely drunk....) it's up to me to be in the right frame to drive safely and if necessary....take the evasive action or situation avoidance needed to get home.
 

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You cant go far wrong if you treat all other vehicles as if they are being
driven by a homicidal maniac.
 

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not true

If it was you would see a huge increase in accidents just as there has been a huge increase in cell phone use

It's the physical act of holding a phone to the ear that is the major issue not the chatting

People in critical situations such as pilots do just fine as long as they have headsets on.
Certainly the act of holding the phone and trying to jot things down is hugely dangerous. But the very latest research carried out over here in the Uk by various universities and government agencies has show that talking on a hands free device is almost as dangerous due to the distraction it causes. Here in the Uk talking on a phone by holding it is illegal but at the moment talking on hands free is still legal but not advised. It may well become illegal very soon too. Pilots are a different matter and it's done in a completely different context to someone driving a car or riding a bike for that matter where a wobble to the left or right can take someone out instantly. Pilot chat is all about safety/information and completely necessary and is normally done at times of low workload.
 

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It's easy to profile when I ride off-road, what kind, if any gear they're wearing is a dead give away. No shirt, no helmet, flip flops, = give them room!
 

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While it doesn't fit every driver on the road it fits some to a tee. I was thinking of those that can't seem to coordinate walking and chewing gum at the same time without tripping or choking. I'm sure you know a few too.
 
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