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Hey guys,

Just wondering, the manual states to let the Burgman sufficently warm up before riding. I heard that Electronic Fuel Injected scooters do not need to be warmed up; they can just immediately go. However, is this not good for the scooter, since the oil needs to be warmed before riding?

How long do you guys normally let the engine warm before taking off riding?
And what are the benefits of letting it warm up as opposed to taking off immediately?

Thanks.
 

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Nope. The bike gets about 20 seconds of warmup, and off I go. Mind you, I live in perhaps the most hospitable place on the planet with little rain and no snow. But both the 400 & 650 warm up to operating temp quickly, only four minutes or so and just a couple of miles.
 

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same as Liamjs, it warms up while I finish to put on all the gear and then take off, it should be around 1 minute, then i ride it smooth until the temp gauge reaches the ready to roll zone(half way)
 

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I turn on the electrical system while I put on the gloves and climb aboard, then start it up and just go. I too live in a nice warm climate, and I take it easy getting out to the road, but once I'm there, she jumps right out. She warms up to the usual three bars less than two miles down the road.
 

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I agree with the other comments. Start it, let it run for 30 seconds to circulate the oil and then ride her. But take it easy for the first few miles to allow the engine to warm. Best not to let it idle from cold for too long as this encourages unburned hydrocarbons to enter the oil along with water from the combustion process. This water gets past the piston rings when the engine is cold very easily. This in turn forms nitric acid in the oil if you don't ride the bike long enough to evaporate the water content from the oil. Remember, for every gallon of petrol you burn, you create one gallon of water, some of which always goes into the oil during the warm up period when the piston and rings don't fit the cylinder properly. Just ride it and have fun!
 

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You can if you like but it's not needed. The engine will benefit more from being ridden right away than idling until warm or until the idle speed drops. Oil doesn't lube very well when it's cold compared to when it's hot, and what with the water and unburned fuel going into the oil it's better to get the engine warmed up quicker by riding it. This minimises those effects. But as said above, don't go thrashing off down the road with a cold engine. Let it warm up for two or three miles first before opening it right up. Suzuki make a reference to 'letting the engine sufficiently warm up' before riding it. They literally mean just to make sure it is running smoothly after starting and the engine speed increases on the throttle smoothly before moving off. In subzero temps that's important to do that first so you are not dumping unburned fuel in large quantities into the CAT. In most ambient temps, 30 seconds of fast idle is enough to circulate the oil before riding.
 

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Fire it up put before putting on my gloves, by the time I have them on we are good to go
maybe 30 sec, I then have a 2 mile ride at low speed to get out of town about 30 mph then we are away.
 

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My warn up time is the time it takes to get it out of the garage, put on my jacket, helmet, gloves, find the remote and shut the garage door, and may have to go to the restroom again which requires starting the process over again, I guess mine is warmed up by them. Fuel Injection has sure taken the fun out of starting our machines.
John
 

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I keep a Morini 350 so I can enjoy just that fun John
what a cow that is to start when it want to be, and
juggling the chokes, it as two totally independent ones is
a character building experience I could at times do without.
 

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I have had fuel injected bikes since the mid 90s and I have treated them all exactly the same way and have had no issues at all. I start mine and immediately ride off. I ride at a moderate speed for the first mile and a half to get to the first road with a center line. It is warm per the gauge by that time.
 

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Like others, I just crank it up while I get my helmet, gloves and jacket situated. Then I take off easily and get up to speed gradually. That way, I figure the oil gets warmed up and circulating before it gets put under full operating expectations.
 

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I also just let mine run about 30 seconds then head out.
 

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After reading the posts I would like to add a comment. Right now it is about 22 deg F. (IF) I started my 2004 Burgman 400 for a ride, I would allow it to idle for a few minutes and let the ECU and sensors regulate the fuel. The sensors take into account the temperature, and throttle body position among other things to determine the amount of fuel required during a cold idle. From what I read above all the responders have some sort of warm up routine but not necessarily what Suzuki might want to print, but IMO it's all good. Gone are the good old days of the HIGH IDLE CAM on the carburetor for cold idling, now it is crank it up let it idle, and that's it. When it is warm out, I have much the same routine as the rest of he guys. Let it idle, grab my helmet and glasses, then grab it and twist it...
 
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