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they let me borrow the burring tool for repairs and "ground" the bevel edge on the tire. fresh lube and 110psi, success!
Hmmmmm. Got me thinking. A razor on that edge may be of some use. I would imagine that if a razor could cut it off, it wasn't needed all that much to start with. 馃榿 Gonna take a look at it tonight and see what I see.

Yes, valve core, Mr. Picky. ;)
 

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I do not have any, so no, I haven't tried it.

I wonder if WD-40 would be OK to use. I ask because the application of it is quite easy.
 

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Hmmmmm. Got me thinking. A razor on that edge may be of some use. I would imagine that if a razor could cut it off, it wasn't needed all that much to start with. 馃榿 Gonna take a look at it tonight and see what I see.

Yes, valve core, Mr. Picky. ;)
that little lip was stopping it from mounting on my rim......really does nothing structally on the tire
 

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I advise people not to try to take material off the bead heel.
Most car tyres have surprisingly little material before you hit the chafer that locates and protects the bead in the tyre matrix - the link between your rim and your tyre.


Forcing the tyre and defeating the safety measures designed to prevent putting car tyres onto bike rims is not without risk. The bead does not stretch, that is the point of it will be biting into the tyre material from the inside, weakening the same area they would be being abraded from the outside.
 

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I advise people not to try to take material off the bead heel.
Most car tyres have surprisingly little material before you hit the chafer that locates and protects the bead in the tyre matrix - the link between your rim and your tyre.


Forcing the tyre and defeating the safety measures designed to prevent putting car tyres onto bike rims is not without risk. The bead does not stretch, that is the point of it will be biting into the tyre material from the inside, weakening the same area they would be being abraded from the outside.
all I took off was a little sharp edge, nothing much, just enough to allow the bead to slide and not stop the edge from slipping over the edge....mm not inch...
 

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No sir. I鈥檓 up in New Hampshire
The Char-Broil headquarters are in Columbus, GA. Is why I asked. You know that when they develop a new cooker, or change their cooker, they have to do testing. I bet actual cooking is the best testing. If I worked there, I'd be 500 pounds. I'd set up testing every day. And it would be Porterhouses and filets.

Anywho, I'll let you guys know after I take material off the bead heel. It'll be just fine. Some people solve problems and don't cower away from them. Last night I got home late and the weather was still bad or I would have started whittling. The weather is better now, but tonight I have to head out of town to my Paw's house for the weekend. If I had the Burgman fixed, I would be able to take it up there. Oh well.


7milesout
 

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Whenever we鈥榲e done tyre research and analysis we gathered together previous results as well as our own.

For passenger car tyres explosive failures during mounting startEd in the 70-90 psi range although some went to 130 or even 150. That is for perfect, unblemished tyres.Bead imperfections can reduce this.

Projectile debris from tyre and rim was sufficient to pass through a skull. We were sent quite a few court cases where limbs were removed, brain damage and fatalities.

I remember the thickness of the critical surface layer at the bead seat was less than 0.3 mm (0.011811 inch) on one of the tyres, I can鈥檛 remember the average.

As I鈥檝e mentioned in other threads there is a thin layer that prevents pressurised air from escaping into the carcass and delaminating it causing explosive decompression.
Any damage that isn鈥檛 properly patched or resurfaced can cause slow or sudden failure in use.

Everybody is free to disregard testing and industry Information - but its not fair to tell others that these things carry no risk
 

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<shiver> BB, your post brought back bad memories of the photos of an airman who was improperly servicing an F15 nose wheel (IIRC). Needless to say, it wasn't pretty. <shiver>

When I was a greenhorn, an experienced tech taught me something that I have not forgotten, "airplanes are designed to kill people on the ground. there are things on them that will move and do not care if you are in the way."
 

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Definitely not my favourite part.
I鈥檓 mostly at the design end of things, but used to get called out to inspect wrecks, there are several I don鈥檛 want to remember. Working with and occasionally driving/piloting experimental vehicles has its moments too. However, it鈥檚 amazing what you can walk away from and what will hold together beyond tolerance sometimes.

Know the risks and which bits bite and you hopefully get more years of playing with bigger and louder toys :)
 

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It'll be alright. If my skull is penetrated, I'll slap a bandaid on it once the echo in that hollow chamber subsides. Everything in life carries a risk. I'm not going to hide in my basement.

Besides, let's be for real. I'm not talking about cutting into the daggone bead. I'm talking about cutting off just a skosh, like flash. My guess is, when it comes to cutting on it, there's probably going to be very little or nothing to cut. I speculate what I may actually do when I get my hands on it is carefully lube all up under the bead, where a shop monkey with a brush who's in a hurry doesn't touch. And I also speculate I can probably use some tools to coax the bead up into position on most of the tire, and start it on the right path on the remaining unseated area. These efforts plus some sunlight to make it flex a little, and air pressure should do the trick. We shall see. Then it is all burnouts and wheelies everywhere I go. ;)
 

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I'd rather lightly, LIGHTLY, sand the valley lip of the rim smoother than sand the tire bead.
 

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I'd rather lightly, LIGHTLY, sand the valley lip of the rim smoother than sand the tire bead.
I know you鈥檒l already be aware Dave, but a car tyre will never, ever fully seat on a bike rim so the other problem when messing with the bead is that the tyre can slip on the rim during use - it doesn鈥檛 have the backup of a proper lock to help it.

I don鈥檛 recall seeing it on a Burgman but years ago somebody who ignored advice came back to say their tyre markings no longer lined up with the valve and did that mean it could slip under heavy braking and make.
I recall he was quite rude and dismissive when his tyre went on easily and that was reflected in my 2 word reply.
 

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In the longest run of car tire was my Bridgestone Potenza that I got 22,000 miles on it in my HARSH riding conditions. I rode hard and braked hard. The 'DOT" on the tire lined up to the Valve Stem and 22,000 miles later was still lined up.... SO it must have done enough 360's around the rim and just happened to realign up..... ;)

My local tire dealer (Les Schwab) has a couple cut down CAR tires with weights glued to them. Bothe are from the same tire brand but one is dead stock and the other had rain siping cut into the tread. They have them on a smooth board that the hold up at an angle so the tires can stick or slide. Then then spray water on the board to show how the rain siping helps the tire stick. (Now the reason for this story) I took my rear Burgman rim down and we held the cut tires bead into the bead area of my Motorcycle rim and it fit fine with no gaps or intrusions. You could see it had about 1/16 inch MORE bond area in the bead's side. On a Car rim you could see 1/16 inch gap between the rim and a line on the tire circumference . On the Burgman rim that gap is closed.
 

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With a complete bead - the burgman rim is one of the sizes that gives a strong interference fit. I wouldn鈥檛 expect it to slip, but shaved = less bead = less interference, probably still pretty snug in that size.
Other sizes don鈥檛 come out as tight.

The rim line is in different places on car and motorcycle tyres by 3.5 mm - because car rim spec has a deeper flange (+ different radius). When the tyre and rim are properly paired the flange and rim line match up and create some extra contact. The line then indicates whether or not the tyre is fully or unevenly seated.

A motorcycle tyre on a car rim is going to put the flange down out of sight if the seat mates; where it holds the mating surface off the rim - first one of those I ever tried was just unusable, may as well have tied a scarf around the rim :)
 

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The rim line also reduces stress as it eases the the tyre on and off the rim as the tyre flexes under Load or lateral forces.
 

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Wish I had taken pictures.

We all have seen the charts of the mis-match of a car tire in a motorcycle rim but my test at the tire store showed that the 'Toyo' tire they had fit the Burgman rim real nice. I measuerd the Bridgestone tire bead flange and it was about the same as that Toyo.

In these charts I modified the top one to look like a Burgman 650's with the drop down valley. The Blue arrows point to where I smoothed out mine by removing less than 0.0125 inch (0.3175mm).

unnamed top.jpg


My 650 Burgman did not have these interference or gaps

unnamed lower.jpg
 
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Next time I take a tire off the rear rim I will take a good picture and also measurements of the contact patch.

I will also picture and measure one of my car rims.

I did at one time have all these pictures but Windows 10 said I did not have 'Copywrite Permission' to have them and deleted over 1,000 of my pictures in one of their "FORCED" Windows 7 to Windows 10 conversions....
 
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