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Discussion Starter #1
Went for my first short long ride yesterday, started to play with the shifting options. Even after reading the manual I'm not sure why one not the other.
What do you use power for?
Also had the gas gauge start to blink at about 135 mi. tank only took 2.9 gal. How far should I be able to go before I run out of gas? I would like to test by running it dry, carrying my .9 gal Reda can to get me going. Will I do any harm letting it run dry? Love the ride. Had the windshield cut down so I can now see over it. Ordered a new GPS, tires , and Kissen brake lights.Added a bead seat cover. Will do complete fluid change,plugs, and go for a long long ride. Any other thoughts on preparing the Burgman for a 4+k ride?
Thanks for your help.
 

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To tell the truth I don't see any reason to use the manual with one exception. Under some situations you can lock the CVT in overdrive mode and get a little better gas mileage. That you will get better gas mileage is not a given. It depends on the driving situation. I very rarely ever use manual mode even for that reason. I run in D all the time.

Power mode is used to give a little better acceleration, much like the passing gear in an car automatic does. You can also use it to get a little better control when running on twisty road conditions or coming downhill in the mountains.
 

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The pump symbol on the gas gauge will start flashing when you drop to one bar. As you found out you still have about a gallon of gas left at that point. When your gas level gets lower both the pump symbol and the last bar will start flashing. At that point you have 0.4 gallon left and at best you are only going to go about 20 miles and maybe less depending on riding conditions. If you used 2.9 gallons in 135 miles then you were getting about 46 mpg. That mileage would give you a little over 18 miles after both started flashing. In other words when both start flashing you probably want to start looking for a gas station sooner rather than later.

I typically try to fill up somewhere between 160 and 170 miles but have been known to stretch it to 190 or more if I am getting good mileage. You need to check your mpg meter to see how you are doing on a particular tank before you try to stretch it. Reset the trip meter each time you fill up then the mpg meter for that tank will reflect how good you are doing. Depending on riding conditions (high winds, high speeds, city driving, etc) you may run empty before you get to 190 miles.
 

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I don't think there is any reason to use M. I tried it to get better mileage on the interstate in OD and it didn't on the hilly roads where I live. The engine ran slower but the additional throttle I had to use to maintain speed on the upgrades caused it to use more gas than if I just kept in in D. ON a long trip a month or so ago, a friend and I were both riding 650s that gets identical mileage (within pennies). He tried to manually shift to save gas and got worse mileage than I did.

I only use the power button on steep crooked mountain roads. It helps on upgrades and accelerating of curves but it is most helpful on downgrades for engine braking.

The gas pump starts blinking when you get down to 1/4 tank and you're actually on reserve when both start blinking. The 2.9 gallons you used is very close to 3/4 tank of gas (3 gallons). I don't worry much about gas until both start blinking. I also set my trip meter to zero every time I fill up so I know how far I have been on the tank of gas. I never trust gas gauges.
 

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Hi asreichler, congrats on the bike. Is she brand new? If so, your engine will be very tight until it's run in and covered a few thousand miles. So gas mileage wont be great at the moment. Especially as you are probably playing with the throttle a bit too. This will improve considerably. However, if gas mileage is low on a second hand bike then it's probably just you getting used to riding her and playing a bit with the engine and tranny. I took a 650 Burgman to Italy and refilled every 145 miles just to be sure I would not run out. I was heavily loaded and hitting the fast routes which dropped gas mileage by quite a bit over the norm. Buffalo's figures are about right for normal riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Quantum Mechanic, the bike is a 2011 650 with 10k mi. I may have put too many questions under one heading because I was looking forward to trying to let the Burg run dry so I could really see how far it will go on one tank. Do you know if any damage will happen if you run her dry?
 

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I usually run to 150 miles indicated on my 650 before filling up, but then again I'm running typically around 55mph ( country roads where I live) ad I put in anywhere from 2.6 to 2.8 gallons of gas in the tank. Not so sure running the tank dry is a good idea as I'd think the fuel pump motor would get hot due to no fuel to cool off with. IMHO

Greg
 

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Thanks Quantum Mechanic, the bike is a 2011 650 with 10k mi. I may have put too many questions under one heading because I was looking forward to trying to let the Burg run dry so I could really see how far it will go on one tank. Do you know if any damage will happen if you run her dry?
You don't really need to do that experiment. There's enough experience here on the board to tell you without having to go through it.

Range comes down to fuel milage on the particular tank you're on. Reset one of the tripometers whenever you fill up. The bike's computer will give you an indication of your average fuel mileage as you ride. If you're getting an indicated 50 mpg on that particular tank, your range is 200 miles (50 X 4 gallons). If you're averaging 45, range is 180. Just monitor the average and you'll know your range on any given tank of fuel.

The fuel mileage computer is generally a couple mpg low, which is a good thing. So 50 mpg indicated is usually 51-52 mpg actual. This will keep you out of trouble as it gives you a touch of reserve.

As an example, my last tank the computer indicated 49.7 average mpg. I filled at 180 miles with 3.5 gallons. So actual was 51.5 or so. I still had .5 gallon unsused, so actual range would have been a tad over 200 miles (180 + (51.5 X .5 gal)).

Hope this helps.
 

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Every once it a while I will end up in a situation where the bike wants to cruise under 3,000 rpm, so I will go to M and drop a gear. This was especially the case during the break-in when I didn't want to lug the motor. 95% of the time I'm in D.

Running the tank dry once or twice won't hurt the bike. Doing it repeatedly is hard on the fuel pump, hence the absence of petcocks on modern fuel-injected bikes. Like everyone else, I start looking for a gas station around 150 miles just to be sure I won't get a ticket on the freeway somewhere. Here in MN, running out of gas isn't considered a mechanical breakdown, and the state patrol will give you an idiot award if you manage it.
 

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I haven't had much use for M myself. Power mode gives me enough downhill engine braking, if necessary. I do use P mode regularly when I am splitting lanes up to a stop light, just for maximum acceleration to pull ahead of traffic when it turns green. There is a noticeable difference in wide-open-throttle acceleration (peak RPM is higher). But most of the time it isn't needed and I prefer the lesser engine braking of D mode, when coming to a stop, and improved gas mileage versus P mode.
 

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I use the power button all the time to slow down in twirtys or at a stop sign.. The D is fine, but in the mountains you may want to use Manual to reduce wear on the brakes.. The Burgman 650 is the only scooter that can climb (and desend) Mt. Washington in NH because of the manual transmission..
 

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I use the power button all the time to slow down in twirtys or at a stop sign.. The D is fine, but in the mountains you may want to use Manual to reduce wear on the brakes.. The Burgman 650 is the only scooter that can climb (and desend) Mt. Washington in NH because of the manual transmission..
I can see the point when riding in the mountains, where you risk overheating the brakes, but on flat roads, it's just unnecessary wear on the CVT belt, which is 10 times harder to replace than the brake pads and disks, and much more expensive.

I hated driving with a colleague, who would downshift through all the gears at every red light to avoid using the brakes.

Sure enough, his brake disks had to be changed prematurely due to rust, and at 100,000 miles the gearbox needed new syncromesh rings.

I clear case of false economy.
 
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