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Discussion Starter #1
OK ! I have the CVT split and apart , pretty simple once you have the tools . Now both plastic gears and both the primary and secondary pulleys are also frozen in . I’m thinking these are just supposed to come right out ? So what’s the trick ? I have no dynamite on hand so lets rule that out up front :D

Condition .

The belt is intact but has some of the black material on the very edge of the belt chipped away in a few spots , is that common ? Asembly actuator gear is chewed up , when I turn the lower gear assembly it in turn turns the primary pulley gear and the two sides of the primary pulley opens and closes . Does that mean the primary pulley might be OK ?

So other that dynamite where do I go from here ?

TheReaper!
 

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The plastic gears just lift out. I have not had any problem getting them out in the three CVTs I have had apart. Before you can remove the primary pulley you have to remove the pulley stopper bolt but other than that it also just lifts out as does the secondary pulley. The kicker is that sometimes corrosion occurs between the bearings and the case making them hard to get out.

When I pulled the secondary pulley out of my CVT that was the case. I pulled and pulled but could not get it to come out. What I finally did was to heat the outside of the CVT housing where the bearing fits in with a heat lamp. Since it is aluminum it heats faster than the steel bearing. That let the housing expand enough that the pulley finally broke free. Once I had it out I used fine emery cloth to clean the corrosion from the outside of the bearing and the inside of the case. Then the assembly would slide in and out easily. Had a similar problem with both the primary and secondary pulleys on the third one I took apart and had to use heat on them.

Are you talking about the black coating on some of the metal links flaking off? If so that should not be. Even on my broken belt the black coating was intact. My guess is that even though the primary is opening and closing when turned by hand it is not functioning correctly. It may be that the keys that lock the movable face to the shaft have sheared letting the movable face spin on the shaft. That would cause uneven loading on the two sides of the belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On the plastic gear bearings I think the re-builder used locktite , I got the top one out hammering on it back and forth and it finally popped out . On the the long one I got the stem out but the bearing is still in the case , which should prove interesting :angryfire: . No biggy , I'll try some heat on all of it , that was my next step but I wanted to ask an expert first . On the belt , the flaking is on the very edge and the pulleys appear to be in perfect condition . Also the pulley stopper bolt was in near perfect condition . So far it's been pretty interesting .

TheReaper!


The plastic gears just lift out. I have not had any problem getting them out in the three CVTs I have had apart. Before you can remove the primary pulley you have to remove the pulley stopper bolt but other than that it also just lifts out as does the secondary pulley. The kicker is that sometimes corrosion occurs between the bearings and the case making them hard to get out.

When I pulled the secondary pulley out of my CVT that was the case. I pulled and pulled but could not get it to come out. What I finally did was to heat the outside of the CVT housing where the bearing fits in with a heat lamp. Since it is aluminum it heats faster than the steel bearing. That let the housing expand enough that the pulley finally broke free. Once I had it out I used fine emery cloth to clean the corrosion from the outside of the bearing and the inside of the case. Then the assembly would slide in and out easily. Had a similar problem with both the primary and secondary pulleys on the third one I took apart and had to use heat on them.

Are you talking about the black coating on some of the metal links flaking off? If so that should not be. Even on my broken belt the black coating was intact. My guess is that even though the primary is opening and closing when turned by hand it is not functioning correctly. It may be that the keys that lock the movable face to the shaft have sheared letting the movable face spin on the shaft. That would cause uneven loading on the two sides of the belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well I got it all apart , I think who ever rebuilt this did in fact use Loctite on all the bearings :banghead: On top of that the threads in the pulley shafts were stripped out , so I couldn't use them with a home made puller to remove the primary and secondary pulleys from the casing . All that said it was a great experience , glad I was able to get my hands on one for free to experiment on even if it was a POS . Before I did this I thought it would be best to replace a bad CVT with one with low mileage from a wrecked bike , that opinion was reinforced after tearing this one down . If every thing went right doing one of these would be a pretty straight forward endeavor , but with most mechanical repairs there is no such thing as every thing going right . Snafus are unfortunately part of the territory . Also you need the right tools for this along with torches , I had to get the case really hot to remove the pulleys and still they fought me all the way .

If it were me and I had one of these blow and I wanted to keep the bike , I would be more than happy to pay $500.00 for a slightly used CVT and pay the dealer the $730.00 they charge to do the job . For a total of $1,230.00 my bike would be back on the road and IMHO that is a BARGAIN !!! When one of these go you never know what’s inside until you open it up , could just be the belt and it could be Pandora’s Box . I’m reasonably sure some one will disagree with me but that’s my take on the subject .

TheReaper!
 

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Sounds like you got one that had been repaired by a ham fisted repairman. Little wonder that it failed. You should not have had to heat them anywhere near that hot. Like I said I just heated mine with a heat lamp bulb. A heat gun should also work. If you had to use a torch and heat them that hot then the bearings were probably ruined in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Question about the primary pulley . When I grab the upper half of the pulley and turn it against the lower half it will move about an inch before it stops . Does this mean keyway is sheared , or is that normal . I haven't take it apart yet and I am assuming it comes apart by removing the nut on the very bottom ?

TheReaper!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
YUP ! got it apart tonight and sure enough keys were sheered . Actually one was sheered and the other was AWOL , what I mean is there was only evidence of enough material to make up one key . Where the rest of it went is beyond me . On another note , does any thing ever go wrong with the secondary pulley ? It looks pretty indestructible ?

TheReaper!
 

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The keyways can be welded up and milled back to shape, and new keys can be made, at least in Italy.
With the supply of low-mile, low-speed wrecks you have in USA, and no language barrier, getting a good used CVT is easier and cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I agree here in the states it’s far better to replace the entire unit with one off a low mileage wreck . With the tax structure in Europe I can well understand why they fix them . Here in the states from what I’ve learned by parting out several of these though , is most people don’t even want to take the used route . First off finding that low mileage CVT is not all that easy , there is more demand for them than supply . In the last month or so I have had calls for 4 CVT’s but only had one to sell . Then more times than not , these bikes with the blown CVT’s are overall high pretty beat up high mileage bikes . So the guy looks at his beat up POS and thinks , do I want to stick $500.00 or more for a used CVT , then maybe $700 to $1,000 for labor to install it ? Most of the time he comes to the conclusion that LaDude coined “it’s a disposable bike” . 99% of the time paying a dealer up to $4,000 to rebuild one is pretty much out of the question , so the majority of these become parts bikes . Personally I’ve seen several with blown CVT’s that were so beat up , that they weren't worth the time to take them apart . All that said I’m glad I finally got the chance to tear into one of these , the process took a lot of the mystery out of it . LaDude’s videos are extremely helpful but there is nothing like the hands on experience .

TheReaper!





The keyways can be welded up and milled back to shape, and new keys can be made, at least in Italy.
With the supply of low-mile, low-speed wrecks you have in USA, and no language barrier, getting a good used CVT is easier and cheaper.
 
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