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From a 400 owner, I read about the CVT stop bolt, briefly what is the deal with it? Just curious
 

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There is a bolt, installed from the exterior, the shaft of which goes into the CVT and acts as a stopper for the primary pulley. There is a slotted piece which bangs against the smooth, thread less end of the bolt. The tip of the bolt has been known to shear off, resulting in an automatic $2500 or so repair. Over the years, the bolt has been strengthened. It only takes a few minutes to replace and costs only a few bucks. Some folks change it out as often as every oil change or two as preventative maintenance.
 

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The purpose of the stopper bolt is to give the electric motor in the CVT something to work against so it can adjust the width of the primary pulley to change ratios. It stops the adjuster from spinning when the electric motor engages.

Whether the bolt failing causes the CVT to fail or the CVT failing causes the stopper bolt to fail is a debatable mater. My experience has been that if the CVT is otherwise healthy the bolt will not wear much. I've changed the bolt in my CVT only once in the 120,000+ miles I've put on it. The bolt that is in it now has been there for over 70,000 miles and the wear is negligible.
 

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I thought the conclusion was that the bolt is kind of like a fuse, if it starts to wear, it's a tell-tale of the CVT going out.

The cure for blowing fuses is not a fuse with higher rating.
 

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Whether the bolt failing causes the CVT to fail or the CVT failing causes the stopper bolt to fail is a debatable mater. My experience has been that if the CVT is otherwise healthy the bolt will not wear much. I've changed the bolt in my CVT only once in the 120,000+ miles I've put on it. The bolt that is in it now has been there for over 70,000 miles and the wear is negligible.
I thought the conclusion was that the bolt is kind of like a fuse, if it starts to wear, it's a tell-tale of the CVT going out.

The cure for blowing fuses is not a fuse with higher rating.
Despite having read several past threads on the stopper bolt issue, these two remarks are the first time I recall seeing that inference. Not debating it at all...I'm just surprised it is news to me with as much as I read the forum.

So, if one starts seeing significant wear on a pulley bolt, does that mean an immediate CVT teardown? If so, if it is done prior to everything breaking loose and totally trashing the CVT, a significantly lower repair bill results (replacing only a worn part or two as opposed to everything that gets torn up once loose metal start getting thrown around the guts of the CVT)?
 

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Despite having read several past threads on the stopper bolt issue, these two remarks are the first time I recall seeing that inference. Not debating it at all...I'm just surprised it is news to me with as much as I read the forum.
This is not the first time that postulation has been put forth. It has been discussed in other threads.

So, if one starts seeing significant wear on a pulley bolt, does that mean an immediate CVT teardown? If so, if it is done prior to everything breaking loose and totally trashing the CVT, a significantly lower repair bill results (replacing only a worn part or two as opposed to everything that gets torn up once loose metal start getting thrown around the guts of the CVT)?
That is a conclusion many including myself have come to. Whether or not you do an immediate tear down might hinge on if you are doing the work yourself or paying someone to do it.

It depends on what is going bad inside the CVT but that is something your not going to know until you take it apart. If you are paying someone to do it the labor cost are going to be high enough that it might be just as well to wait until the CVT craters. If you are doing it yourself then yes go ahead and pull it. It might just be a bearing going out and replacing it could save damage to expensive parts like the primary pulley assembly or CVT case.
 

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This is not the first time that postulation has been put forth. It has been discussed in other threads.



That is a conclusion many including myself have come to. Whether or not you do an immediate tear down might hinge on if you are doing the work yourself or paying someone to do it.

It depends on what is going bad inside the CVT but that is something your not going to know until you take it apart. If you are paying someone to do it the labor cost are going to be high enough that it might be just as well to wait until the CVT craters. If you are doing it yourself then yes go ahead and pull it. It might just be a bearing going out and replacing it could save damage to expensive parts like the primary pulley assembly or CVT case.
Thanks, Buffalo:thumbup:
 

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From a 400 owner, I read about the CVT stop bolt, briefly what is the deal with it? Just curious
Mike, what they all said is true for a 650. But has nothing to do with a 400 unless it is pulling you up a hill and the bolt fails. :twisted:
 
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