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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Followed the advice here on the forum and replaced my bolt even though my second hand Burgman only has 4000 miles on it. I was very surprised at the amount of wear that the bolt has on it.
 

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I changed out mine twice in 34,000 miles in my '04 and it looked much like yours. I haven't checked my '12 yet in 17000 miles but should next time I change oil. I had understood that the '12's didn't need changing as often. Should check it to find out I guess.
 

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Followed the advice here on the forum and replaced my bolt even though my second hand Burgman only has 4000 miles on it. I was very surprised at the amount of wear that the bolt has on it.
WOW ! ! ! You not mention what year your burgie, new replacement bolt # 21748-10G10 that fit 2002 to 2009 is harder, read on couple of site in Europe it recommend you re-torque to 26 lb/ft torque every 1600-1800 mile and when perform oil change, change every 8000 - 9000 mile or so if it have more than small nick on bolt. They very inexpensive from Partzilla and few other on line store.

What all that brown stuff on bolt it look like it burn or something.
 

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I changed out mine twice in 34,000 miles in my '04 and it looked much like yours. I haven't checked my '12 yet in 17000 miles but should next time I change oil. I had understood that the '12's didn't need changing as often. Should check it to find out I guess.
Bolt on 2012 is 2 or 2.2 ml longer than previous and bolt seat in pulley rework as well by Suzuki, please advise how it look when you check it. 2-3 photo would be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
2008

My scoot is a 2008 model. Don"t know what the burnt stuff is but it comes off if I scrape it with a tissue.
 

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Bolt on 2012 is 2 or 2.2 ml longer than previous and bolt seat in pulley rework as well by Suzuki, please advise how it look when you check it. 2-3 photo would be good.
Pulled mine today while I had the scoot up on the lift and it looked much better then my '04 ever did. No sharp edges or nicks. There is one wear spot on it (top photo) so I'll change it out in the next 10,000 miles or so. Notice the slight discoloration. It cleaned up good. Sorry I ran out of daylight when I finished up.





 

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I changed mine at 9,000 and change and it had a couple good nicks in it. It is something I will definitely continue to monitor. It is nice that it is in an easy place to check it BUT it would be even better if Suzuki came out and really explained and put a service plan together for this. I am hoping my CVT last a a long time. I am not sure what else I can do to make sure that happens.
 

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Pulled mine today while I had the scoot up on the lift and it looked much better then my '04 ever did. No sharp edges or nicks. There is one wear spot on it.
That's because the newer primary adjuster (2010-up unless it was replaced with the newer assembly like my '03) end does not have a groove for the shield the way the earlier models did. The old one is below. The newer one they moved the shield groove up so it doesn't intersect the notch for the stopper bolt and made it deeper by 2mm.

Old one.

 

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I didn't feel like ordering them, so I went to the hardware store and bought some class 8.8 bolts of the appropriate size and turned them to stopper bolt configuration. I increased the tip diameter .004" and increased the length .010"

Cost a buck and some play time at the lathe each.

 

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I didn't feel like ordering them, so I went to the hardware store and bought some class 8.8 bolts of the appropriate size and turned them to stopper bolt configuration. I increased the tip diameter .004" and increased the length .010"

Cost a buck and some play time at the lathe each.
Looks awesome just hope it's not too hard and wears the adjuster end rather than the bolt. Stock they wear a little of both as shown in the photo.
 

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Grade 8.8 bolts aren't particularly tough,..Rockwell~25.

I'm looking at your photo of the primary adjuster and it appears that the tip of the stopper bolt could extend much farther into the notch without interfering with anything.

I can't understand why Suzuki chose to have so little contact area from the stopper bolt.

I also don't understand why they chose to have a primary spline adapter that only engaged about 10mm of the mating splined hole on the 2003-2004 models.

And while I'm at it, I don't understand why they didn't make both the adjuster drum *and* the stopper bolt out of a grade of steel that was tough enough to take the stress that's being imposed on them without distortion.

As a toolmaker, I know a little bit about the qualities of various steels and the properties which can be applied to them through heat treating.

It's really not rocket science. There's a steel and a process for it that would eliminate the wear on those mating parts. Several, actually.
 

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I'm looking at your photo of the primary adjuster and it appears that the tip of the stopper bolt could extend much farther into the notch without interfering with anything.

I can't understand why Suzuki chose to have so little contact area from the stopper bolt.

I also don't understand why they chose to have a primary spline adapter that only engaged about 10mm of the mating splined hole on the 2003-2004 models.

And while I'm at it, I don't understand why they didn't make both the adjuster drum *and* the stopper bolt out of a grade of steel that was tough enough to take the stress that's being imposed on them without distortion.
Actually no it can't, go measure the depth. the 2010 model they machined the notch up to the bearing race (you can see it in the updated assembly, I just don't have a photo handy) to get a 2mm longer stopper bolt in there.

Lots of things don't make any sense. Why not heat treat the splines? Why run the splines dry? Why not use a larger input bearing? Why not seal between the CVT case and engine case or cap where you have dry splines? Why have the adjuster end with 1/2" mating surface fitting into a aluminum case with nearly an 1" of mating surface? Why have a steel adjuster fit into a aluminum case that can vibrate and wear the mating surfaces? Why use a rubber o-ring (that can split and fall out of place allowing the adjust to vibrate easier) under a shim at the adjuster in case? I could go on.

Honestly there is little difference in spline contact between the old ('03-'04 and new ('05-current) just that they no longer use an adapter gear (a $100 easily replaceable part which didn't fail, instead it took out a $700 assembly which is a PITA to change)and the CVT input spline directly to the engine gear.

Given a choice between what you want to wear I'd that the easy bolt any day over that adjuster cause something is always going to wear.
 

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Was the CVT purpose-designed for the AN650 or was it borrowed from another product such as a snowmobile or ATV? If I were the engineering manager at Suzuki I'd look for an existing CVT assembly to use (that economy-of-scale thing) before I thought of designing one from scratch. Using an existing design might explain some of the issues such as the primary pulley adapter.
 

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As far as I know the CVT in the 650 is unique to it and is not used anywhere else.
 

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I took the original stopper bolt from my 2003 and put it on the hardness tester at work.

It measured Rockwell 34. I was surprised to see it that high.
 

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I took the original stopper bolt from my 2003 and put it on the hardness tester at work.

It measured Rockwell 34. I was surprised to see it that high.
I'd be curious to compare the gold one to the silver one for hardness. Somehow I doubt there is much difference.
 

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I'd be curious to compare the gold one to the silver one for hardness. Somehow I doubt there is much difference.
Seeing how tough the original was got me thinking about the class 8.8 unit that I turned and have been running for 700 miles, so I just went out to the garage and took it out for inspection.

There's just a hint of a mark on it. If I hadn't been specifically looking for it I would have missed it.

The original stopper bolt that I replaced wasn't in very bad condition. I just wanted to install one of my own.

My bike is a 2003 model with 17,400 miles. 8000 miles ago I installed Milek's primary spline adapter.

Because of all of this, I'm of the opinion that a healthy CVT doesn't wear a stopper bolt too much. I'm not familiar enough with how everything ties together to have an opinion on "why",..but I believe that a severely chewed up stopper bolt is indicative of a problem in the CVT.
 

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Because of all of this, I'm of the opinion that a healthy CVT doesn't wear a stopper bolt too much. I'm not familiar enough with how everything ties together to have an opinion on "why",..but I believe that a severely chewed up stopper bolt is indicative of a problem in the CVT.
I came to that conclusion some time ago. As near as I can tell replacing a stopper bolt that is severely chewed up does not lengthen the time the CVT will go before it has a failure. The new bolt will likely just get chewed up in short order.

What a severely chewed up bolt does is tell you that there is something else going wrong inside the CVT that needs fixing.
 

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The original stopper bolt that I replaced wasn't in very bad condition. I just wanted to install one of my own.

My bike is a 2003 model with 17,400 miles. 8000 miles ago I installed Milek's primary spline adapter.

Because of all of this, I'm of the opinion that a healthy CVT doesn't wear a stopper bolt too much. I'm not familiar enough with how everything ties together to have an opinion on "why",..but I believe that a severely chewed up stopper bolt is indicative of a problem in the CVT.
Nothing wrong with that and its good for us as a group to learn.

I did Milek's adapter when I rebuilt mine with the updated primary (comes with the long stopper bolt). A best buy for these older diesels, lol.

That's what the general consensus is here I believe. We think the o-ring that is under the shim against the adjuster splits and partially drops out allowing the adjuster to move/vibrate more wearing the bolt. I've seen a few of those be split and fall out of place when opening the CVT. It's also possible the anti-seize used on the adjuster dries out causing it to bind a bit.
 
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