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Has anyone checked the wedges in the primary pulley??
this is what a member from our Belgian forum found

doesn't look good at all, can this cause a broken belt??
I have seen one where they were flat allowing the pulley halves to spin independently of each other twisting the belt. Yes it can destroy a belt but as long as they are in place (can't just fall out) and not too badly worn it will work. Over time they wear and the play between the two halves gets worse until they fail completely.
 

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Good to know about that. Must of been part of the primary pulley redesign that was done in 2011. First time I have seen pictures of the shaft taken from one of those. So there was more to the redesign than just the new longer stopper bolt. Evidently Suzuki figured out there was more to the stopper bolt failure than just the length of the stopper bolt.
 

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That failure of the keys is likely more common than we might have though and might be one of the root causes for the stopper bolt failure.
 

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It would be a complete CVT tear-down including shimming the primary pulley assembly, according to the service manual.
 

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Nice to see the internal improvements. I've had a few with either completely failed keys or worn with a fair amount of twisting slop between the pulley halves which can't be good for the drive belt. I wonder if they have done any heat treating on the shaft at the splines/input bearing.
 

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When I pulled this recently the first thing I thought is this thing needs more and better key ways . The new one looks a lot better but you still have those plastic gears . So ?


TheReaper!









New primary pulley

now 4 wedges instead of 2

 

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When I pulled this recently the first thing I thought is this thing needs more and better key ways . The new one looks a lot better but you still have those plastic gears . So ?
If everything else in the CVT is working as it is suppose to those plastic gears should not have much load on them and should last a long long time. The advantage to using the plastic gears is that they do not need lubricant on them and given where they are located you would not want to put any lubricant there.
 

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On the German forum, MaxT just wrote that a guy in Belgium repairs the CVT with new keys he makes himself for 150 Euros or $168 + shipping (cost prohibitive to anywhere but Europe)
I've previously posted pictures from Italy of keyway repair, and I'm pretty sure that a guy I know personally, who refurbishes all kinds of broken-down industrial equipment, could do it too, much cheaper than a new CVT assy or even a used one in unknown condition. It would probably be more durable than the OEM 2-key version as well.
 

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On the German forum, MaxT just wrote that a guy in Belgium repairs the CVT with new keys he makes himself for 150 Euros or $168 + shipping (cost prohibitive to anywhere but Europe)
I've previously posted pictures from Italy of keyway repair, and I'm pretty sure that a guy I know personally, who refurbishes all kinds of broken-down industrial equipment, could do it too, much cheaper than a new CVT assy or even a used one in unknown condition. It would probably be more durable than the OEM 2-key version as well.
One of those I worked on had some damage from the two pulley halves spinning and contacting each other because the keys also act as a end stop to prevent contact. While it might be possible to reuse them with new keys I wouldn't feel comfortable reusing it. The coating has come off where they spun against each other. For the $612 Ron Ayers sells the new assembly for with a free shipping code it provides peace of mind knowing all the bearings are new, has four keys (which should reduce slop over time), and has the longer stopper bolt. All that seems a bargain if you really intend to have the bike long term.
 

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One of those I worked on had some damage from the two pulley halves spinning and contacting each other because the keys also act as a end stop to prevent contact. While it might be possible to reuse them with new keys I wouldn't feel comfortable reusing it. The coating has come off where they spun against each other. For the $612 Ron Ayers sells the new assembly for with a free shipping code it provides peace of mind knowing all the bearings are new, has four keys (which should reduce slop over time), and has the longer stopper bolt. All that seems a bargain if you really intend to have the bike long term.

I'm inclined to agree with buying new parts for a rebuild , it's just to expensive labor wise to do the job twice due to a used part . That said a used CVT out of a low mileage wreck if you can find one reasonably priced , might be the cheapest and best way to go . I have one out of a 6000 mile wreck that I kept for my own parts hoard , guess how many people tried to buy it from me in the past 6 months .


TheReaper!
 
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Don't take this the wrong way . :laugh

LOL ! don't hold your breath on that one . The more you read here the more you'll learn :nerd

I've read just about every CVT thread on this forum back to the very beginning . That's how I learned that these CVT's have gone out as early as 3,000 miles , and that some have lasted into the 80,000 mile mark . As far as why some go early on , there are theories but no one knows for sure . Once you pull it apart you know what failed , but a lot of the time you won't know why . On average these CVT's go a lot longer without any maintenance than other scooters . The problem is they are labor intensive to get to , along with having relatively expensive replacement parts . In order to make these cost effective buy a low mileage used one , then if you want to keep it for a long time find a low mile wreck for a parts bike . You can't change what the Burgman 650 is , but you can change how you go about owning and maintaining one . It is what it is , and IMO it's the best ride in the scooter world by a good margin .

TheReaper!



Took me two days and i barley made it to the twelfth page, also some links are not working and some pictures are so, could someone please write a sequential summary for this?
 

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On the German forum, MaxT just wrote that a guy in Belgium repairs the CVT with new keys he makes himself for 150 Euros or $168 + shipping (cost prohibitive to anywhere but Europe)
I've previously posted pictures from Italy of keyway repair, and I'm pretty sure that a guy I know personally, who refurbishes all kinds of broken-down industrial equipment, could do it too, much cheaper than a new CVT assy or even a used one in unknown condition. It would probably be more durable than the OEM 2-key version as well.
Thank you so much!
 
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