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Discussion Starter #1
Kory ask me to start a thread to document what happened to my CVT and what I am doing to fix it all in one place so here goes. I'm not going to try to do a step by step for how to do it but I will try to post some pictures at major milestones along the way.

First some background.

My bike now has 80,596 miles on it. Weekend before last I jump started a friends bike and in my hast to get going again before his bike died I forgot to release the parking brake when I took off. I remembered it after I had gone about a mile but I suspect that by that time I had stressed the belt pretty good. After that I would feel a little vibration when I accelerated. I road about another 200 miles and by then it had smoothed out and most of the vibration was gone.

I did not ride the 650 all the next week. When the weekend came around I took it out to join a group ride. The vibration was gone and it was running just fine. That was not to last. I think running with the brake on had put the final nail in the coffin for the belt. We were meeting up at a service station about 12 miles from my house. I pulled in and filled up and when we went to leave the bike accelerated up to about 25 and all at once power was not geting to the rear wheel. The engine ran just fine but nothing was getting through.

I pushed it up into a parking lot and hiched a ride with another rider back to my house to get my truck and trailer. We went back and retrieved the bike. When I got it home I put it on the lift and removed the CVT filter. When I reached through the opening and turned the secondary pully the rear wheel turned. That leads me to believe the belt snapped. I've got to pull the CVT out and open it up to confirm that though. I had other things going so did not get started on it until yesterday.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here is what I've done so far.

Yesterday afternoon I spent about 3 hours pulling off the front body work. It should have only taken me about and hour but I had two bolts on the front box that stripped and I had to drill them out.

This morning I pulled the rest of the body work off. All that is left on the bike are the mirrors, dash, windshield and the front fender. It looked like this at that point.
[attachment=3:1tp4kmqd]HPIM1671.JPG[/attachment:1tp4kmqd]

After that I pulled the upper frames and the trunk box off leaving the back looking like this.
[attachment=2:1tp4kmqd]HPIM1672.JPG[/attachment:1tp4kmqd]

Next thing to do was to pull the final drive cover off, unplug and remove the rear light harness, and drain the oils from the engine, transmission and final drive. That left the back of the bike pretty naked.
[attachment=1:1tp4kmqd]HPIM1673.JPG[/attachment:1tp4kmqd]

Now on to the front. First step there is to remove the air box leaving the front looking like this.
[attachment=0:1tp4kmqd]HPIM1674.JPG[/attachment:1tp4kmqd]

That is all I had time for today. Total time spent was about 4 hours. I've got other things to do this afternoon and tomorrow so it will be Sunday before I can get back on it. The starting task then will be to remove the throttle bodies.
 

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Thank you for the update. I am definitely watching how this goes. I am real interested how you handle the "special tools" need with your improvised methods. I would think you could fabricate the CVT guides from a extremely long bolts that have the proper thread pitch by cutting the hex head off and grinding the tops of the round shafts squared to install and remove them from. I don't know how hard it will be to find a 10 inch or so bolt (if that will do it) that is metric. I don't know how to improvise the spline holder tool. I personally wondered if you took a very good piece of 2X3 hickory wood a foot long and caliper measured the spline diameter and used hole saw to put a hole in the wood and then cut the wood in half the length of the piece right through the center of the hole. Hinge one end of it and used the hole as a clamp for the spline by squeezing the non hinged side to lock down the spline. Would this hold it to break the torque on the bolt? I don't think it would damage the spline. Maybe even glue in and line the fabricated jaw with a rubber rim strap piece for addition holding power and bite. I hope you find your pulleys in good shape and only need the belt and some seals. Good luck.
 

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Buffalo,

I had a very tough time removing the upper air box directly above the throttle bodies. It is a VERY tight fit. One word of advise is to take off the rubber grommet in the front on the frame. It will give you just a bit more room so that you can pull the box forward and then up. I was getting very frustrated until I figured that out. Hope that helps.
 

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I think you could use stock threaded studding, not sure what the bolt size is but probably M8, maybe M6 - anyways that size studding is usually readily available and cheap.
 

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Metric threaded rod is hard to come by on this side of the pond. SAE can be found at the local home supply store.
 

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Craig,

thanks for taking the time to document this as best as you can, I am sure a lot of people will benefit from it.
I wish I was there to take pictures and videos for the entire project...

good luck with the project, looking forward to seeing how it all goes...

I am sure we are all going to learn a great deal from your experience... :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I should be back on it tomorrow. Today was to nice a day to waste inside so I took the 400 and went for a little 370 mile ride with Robin on her 650.

onesicktantrum, Is your 2006 an Exec. Mine is but I'm working from a 2005 manual that does not cover the Exec. Right above the air box on the Exec is where the ABS value is located and it looks kind of tight so I am wondering if I am going to have to take the ABS valve loose to be able to get the air box out. Robin has a 2007 manual and she is going to check it and see what it says about the valve but I though if yours is your might already know.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I will make my own guides. If I can find bolts long enough I will just cut the heads off them. If not I have a metric die set so I will get some rod and cut threads in it.

I think having the guides in there will make it easier to slide the CVT out because they will keep the CVT from angling down and putting pressure on the seal and spline causing them to bind. They should also make it easier to get the CVT back in without damaging the seal.
 

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If you laid the whole thing onto the left side, you would keep the CVT from angling down and putting pressure on the seal and spline causing them to bind.

onesicktantrum estimates its weight to 15 - to 20lbs!

As I suggested to onesicktantrum, a longer bolt than the one that holds the shaft adapter could be used to lift the CVT up, by a lever or jack underneath.

You could also lift up the CVT with a winch, just an inch at a time, and put something soft under the rest of the engine.

A person with good welding skills would probably cut the offending frame tubes away and either weld them back on, or convert them into a detachable subframe. How close is it anyway?
 

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Erik

An interesting idea but I do not think there is the access to conduct' all round' welds afterwards.

I doubt the subframe idea is executable in a way that would not lose the frame rigidity for good handling. However it would be worth pursuing if you had a pile of junk to experiment with.

One problem, but a minor one, in the UK you have to declare if the vehicle has been modified - however the chances of that coming to light are slim to zero, Even vehicle inspectors for the annual inspection would not see this. : :wink:
 

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Buffalo said:
Right above the air box on the Exec is where the ABS value is located and it looks kind of tight so I am wondering if I am going to have to take the ABS valve loose to be able to get the air box out. Robin has a 2007 manual and she is going to check it and see what it says about the valve but I though if yours is your might already know.
No need to remove the ABS valve. Just loosen the bolts for the air-filter box and the other components will all fall free.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The bike is now in pieces with the power module separated from the frame. I got a late start this morning. I had to make a run to the grocery store so it was around 9:30 by the time I got started. Finished pulling the frame off the power module at about 2:30. I took an hour off to fix and eat lunch so total time today was about 4 hours.

There was nothing about the whole process that was difficult. It's just unbolt and unplug. Stuff any shade tree mechanic should be able to handle. The hardest thing was figuring out how to release the catches on all the electrical connectors. Each one seemed to work different and sometimes it took a little study and head scratching to figure out where the latch was and how to release it. I would suggest you have someone to help you lift the frame off. I did it by myself and it was all I could do to lift it up and roll it forward without dropping it.

Pictures to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
First thing I did today was drain and remove the radiator. That gave me more room to work on getting the air chamber off the top of the throttle bodies.

Most of you have seen what the front of the engine looks like with the radiator removed but here it is anyway. You can see the top of the valve cover and the plug caps right below the horn.
[attachment=1:2wtep1ms]HPIM1689.JPG[/attachment:2wtep1ms]

Next job was to remove the air chamber. Garry you were right I did not have to remove the ABS unit to get it out but I did have to unbolt it and push it up about 1/2 inch to get enough clearance to pull the air chamber up off the throttle body then forward out of the frame. Looking at the picture I am holding the air chamber to the left of the frame. The two rubber fittings on the bottom go down over the throttle bodies that you can see at the bottom above the blue and red tape. The ABS unit is at the top under that red connector. As you can see the air chamber is as big as the opening, there is only about 1/4 inch clearance between the top of it and the bottom of the ABS unit. You have to pull it up about 1/2 inch to get the rubber fittings off the throttle bodies. On the standard you just unbolt it and pull it back up through the frame. Can't do that on the Exec. I unbolted the ABS mounting bracket from the frame and lifted it up until I got the rubber fittings clear then pulled it forward through where the radiator had been.
[attachment=0:2wtep1ms]HPIM1691.JPG[/attachment:2wtep1ms]
 

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Next I unplugged the wiring connectors, unhooked the throttle cables, and took off the fuel feed line from the throttle bodies and removed them. Here is what the top of the cylinder head looks like with them gone.
[attachment=2:3ox75w81]HPIM1692.JPG[/attachment:3ox75w81]

A couple of things I'm doing as I go. I'm stuffing rags into any openings to keep critters from getting in while it is apart and when I unhook wiring or other connectors I put a piece of colored tape of each end so I know what goes back where. In this picture you can see where I've stuffed rags into the intake openings on top of the cylinder head. You can also see where I put a piece of yellow tape on one of the plugs that attached to the throttle bodies. I've also put a piece of white tape on one of the throttle cables and wrote bottom on it so I know it attached to the bottom of the linkage. There are two cables and I didn't want to get them back in the wrong place.
[attachment=1:3ox75w81]HPIM1694.JPG[/attachment:3ox75w81]

I also discovered that when I unhooked the fuel line it had a siphon prime on it so if I lowered it below the level of the fuel tank it would drain the tank. I stuck it into a 5 gallon gas can use for my mower and let the 4 gallons of gas I had in the tank drain. I was glad I did when I went to lift the frame off the engine. It was heavy enough with the tank empty.
[attachment=0:3ox75w81]HPIM1695.JPG[/attachment:3ox75w81]
 

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Next step was to remove the exhaust system. Notice I did not try to remove the O2 sensor from the pipe. I just followed the wire up to the plug and unplugged it then pulled the wire down and tucked it behind the shield.
[attachment=1:v94hrj9w]HPIM1697.JPG[/attachment:v94hrj9w]

Only thing left to do was to go around and find all the wire connectors and get them unpugged and up out of the way. Once that was done I rolled the bike off the lift and turned it around so when I unbolted the engine mounts I could just roll the frame forward down off the lift and leave the power module on it where I could raise it up to work on it. Here is what it looks like turned around on the lift with everything off and ready to separate the frame from the power module.[attachment=0:v94hrj9w]HPIM1698.JPG[/attachment:v94hrj9w]
 

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Once I went around and made sure all the lines and wires were unhooked again all that was left was to unbolt the rear shocks and pull the engine mount bolts out and separate the frame from the power module. I had a little trouble breaking the mount bolts loose so I fired up the compressor and pulled out my impact wrench. That made short work of running them off. The engine was supported at the back by the center stand and in the front with a floor jack. Once the bolts were out I grapped the frame under the gas tank with my left hand and the handle bar and front brake with my right hand. I heaved with all my might and lifted it up and rolled it forward down off the lift. I do suggest you have someone to help you do this step.

One thing I forgot to get a picture of was the rear brake. Before I turned the bike around I removed the rear caliper. I did not unhook the brake lines. I just lifted the caliper up to the top of the frame behind the fuel tank and attached it there with a piece of wire so it could move forward with the frame. You can see it above and just behind the left rear of the fuel tank.
[attachment=1:2ma85y3x]HPIM1699.JPG[/attachment:2ma85y3x]

This is what it looks like from the other end.
[attachment=0:2ma85y3x]HPIM1701.JPG[/attachment:2ma85y3x]
 

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There was some discussion above about making a section of the frame removable. I looked at that Friday when I started this project and it is something that would make it a lot quicker and easier. You could just remove the section of the frame the unbolt and slide the CVT out without having to take everything apart. You would only have to remove the body work from the seat forward.

I shot this picture of the frame.
[attachment=0:9l4zog31]HPIM1702.JPG[/attachment:9l4zog31]

What you would have to do is cut the lower curved tube just behind the floor board bracket you can just see in the edge of the picture on the right side. At the back you would have to cut the welds loose where it is welded to the top tube. You would also have to cut the gussets at the junction of the top and bottom tubes off. Once you had the lower tube off you would have to build brackets to bolt it back to the top tube. You would have to weld some spacers inside the tubes to add strength and the brackets would have to be gusseted so they would not flex. It would be possible if you had the right tools to do the fabrication work. Unfortunately I don't have those tools.
 

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Wow the 650 looks like a drag bike with it's tupperware off
 

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Buffalo, when you determine the metric thread pitch and needed length, to clear the motor still on the guides, of the home made CVT guides I would like to know those numbers. I figure I will make me up a set of 3 just in case in the future I need them. I hope I could source an extra long metric bolt on the internet to make them out of. I figured doing them in advance will give me plenty of time to source the bolts. I am trying to stay away from threaded rod due to the friction the threaded portion will cause. I want the CVT to "slide" on the guides. Thanks again for the information.
 
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