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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all... I am planning a coast to coast trip.
I am curious what all extra parts you think I should bring with me.

I do have a support vehicle driving with me. So I can pack pretty much anything and everything.
So far I am planning on...

Tires, front and back.
Belt
Clutch and bell
Gas
Oil and filter
Tools of course
Brake pads

What else do you think I should add to this list??
 

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I would take a tire plug kit, and a tire pump or small compressor (and a way to connect to bike, like SAE connector). Spare fuses and lamps, and maybe a spare battery as well, since they can go out without warning and may be hard to find in the middle of nowhere. It's also nice to have a mat to kneel on when working on the bike, shop towels and hand wipes.
 
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Spare Key
Multiple Flashlights including Head Lamp.
Fuse Assortment
A beefed up Metric Tool Kit
Duct Tape, Zip Ties and JB Weld
90-degree Air Valves for when you change tires out.
Ride-On Tire Sealant when doing new tires
Front & Rear Wheel Bearings & Brakes
Spark Plug
Service Manual
Directory of Suzuki Dealerships along route.
First Aid Kit with Monkey Butt Powder.
Extra Pair of prescription Glasses or contacts
Emergency Medical Info Taped to Top of Helmet.
Insurance and Prescription Cards
Foul Weather Gear and a change of shoes.
Coffee Thermos
Face Masks
Ear Plugs

Walkie-Talkie app for you and SAG Driver:
 

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If I was going to take all that gear with me and a chase car too.... I would just get in the car and ride with the windows down. My opinion is worth what you paid for it.
 

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My recommendations will all fit under the seat.
 

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Pick up a rectifier, you can replace it your self OEM ones run about $150 - especially if you will be running other things off the battery. You can see it on the left side above the final gear bolted to the frame. You will need to remove the left rear panel a bit to get at it. Also a set of front & rear wheel bearings with seals and a repair manual. Perhaps a fresh set of rear pads and a spare oil filter as ones for the burgle can be hard to find. Lastly I suggest getting a new rear/front tire and give it to someone who can fedex it to you. If possible schedule your oil change on the other coast before you go. When do you leave? Best of luck!
 

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Pick up a rectifier, you can replace it your self OEM ones run about $150 - especially if you will be running other things off the battery. You can see it on the left side above the final gear bolted to the frame. You will need to remove the left rear panel a bit to get at it. Also a set of front & rear wheel bearings with seals and a repair manual. Perhaps a fresh set of rear pads and a spare oil filter as ones for the burgle can be hard to find. Lastly I suggest getting a new rear/front tire and give it to someone who can fedex it to you. If possible schedule your oil change on the other coast before you go. When do you leave? Best of luck!
Replace your tires (and drive belt if you're on a 400), get the axle bearings done too while you're in there. And of course an oil change and new filters (all sections -- engine, final drive, etc.).

Get this done a week before you leave, and ride around normally during that week to make sure the service was done properly. Better to discover a loose oil drain bolt or brake master cylinder cover near home than half a day away from home...

Tools? What repairs are you prepared to do by the side of the road? Plugging a tire is easy -- bring a plug kit of your choice, and some way to re-inflate the tire. Replacing the drive belt? If replaced just before the trip, it should last. But if you're up to it, bring the tools and a spare belt. Duct-taping broken Tupperware back into place after an accidental tip-over or worse? Zip ties can be your friend too. Fuses. Maybe a rectifier -- not sure those are a huge trouble point on Burgmans, but someone will set me straight if they are. Light bulbs (headlight, tail-light, turn signal), but these aren't mobility-kill failures (legality-kill, sure -- but if you have to, high beams will substitute for blown-out low-beams, and you can hand signal if the turn signal lights fail). Maybe bring brake fluid, but that should be available most places. Bring oil if your bike burns it at speed (pre-'07 400s do this, it's just one of those things). Maybe bring a little pre-mixed coolant -- but if you know it leaks a little, you probably ought to get that fixed before heading cross-country since it might get catastrophically worse and you can't really carry enough to refill the whole bike.... assuming you could patch the leak in the first place.

And so on.

Just figure out which repairs you can do (or are willing to do) and just prepare for those. Anything beyond that goes to your roadside assistance plan and your credit card...
 

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Spare Key
Fuse Assortment
A beefed up Metric Tool Kit
Duct Tape, Zip Ties and JB Weld
90-degree Air Valves for when you change tires out.
Ride-On Tire Sealant when doing new tires
Front & Rear Wheel Bearings & Brakes
Spark Plug
Service Manual
Directory of Suzuki Dealerships along route.
First Aid Kit with Monkey Butt Powder.
Extra Pair of prescription Glasses or contacts
Emergency Medical Info Taped to Top of Helmet.
Insurance and Prescription Cards
Foul Weather Gear and a change of shoes.
Coffee Thermos
Face Masks
Ear Plugs

Walkie-Talkie app for you and SAG Driver:
Underseat Goodies:

I think the list from @DarisPakar is a fine one.

I mostly do c. 200-mile day trips these days, and overnight long distance trips just once or twice a year on my '08 Exec. Regardless of the ride, my always-under-the-seat collection is very similar to his (although I don't carry the service manual). Although @thejosiahx is riding a 400, not a 650, I don't think it matters for this discussion. Here's my list, which is very similar:

- Tools, including a multi-tool (with pliers and wire-cutter), some sockets and hex keys, my trusty Knipex 7" wrench (https://www.amazon.com/Knipex-8603180-7-Inch-Pliers-Wrench/dp/B000X4KP1C/), and so forth.

- A tube of JB Weld, cable ties, a folded "roll" of duct tape, fuses, a roll of stick-to-itself silicone tape, a bungee cord (or a ROK-Strap would be better), etc.

- A couple of small flashlights.

- A first aid kit.

- A small 12V air pump, and Stop & Go's small "mushroom" plug kit (Pocket Tire Plugger for all Tubeless Tires), and a tire pressure gauge (if you don't have a TPMS -- I have FOBO sensors).

- A few bottles of Gatorade.

- Some waterproof outerwear. If anyone's interested in the details, I discuss the clothing in an article I wrote for webBikeWorld three years ago, The All-Season Motorcycle Riding Outfit .

- Brand new wheel bearings. About a dozen years ago, I spent two nights (zero nights planned) in Hagerstown, MD, on my way from Albany to Asheville. My rear-wheel bearing went on the interstate around there, and it took a local dealer a couple of days to procure the bearings. So I never leave home without them. I don't have the tools on the bike (or at home) to change out bearings, but at least a shop won't have to get them from somewhere.

- Extra pair of prescription glasses.

- Custom-molded silicone ear plugs (which I had made through my local hearing-aid office -- I wear hearing aids off the bike).

- A spray bottle of detailer (primarily for the face shield) and a couple of micro-fiber cloths.

- And, yep, these days: some extra face masks.

- For riding alone, I pay (arguably too much, i.e., not cheap) for a Spot Gen3 satellite-based emergency SOS system (SPOT Gen3 Satellite Messenger with GPS | Saved by SPOT) (in a jacket pocket), but that's probably not an issue for @thejosiahx's trip.

Emergency Info:

Now, I do have an issue with the "Emergency Medical Info Taped to Top of Helmet" that @DarisPakar mentioned. Years ago, I used to do that. In fact, a defunct outfit called Cycle Gadgets used to give them away, with any orders. I'm talking about a clear flexible plastic holder, with a folded up piece of paper inside, on which you could write your blood type, emergency contacts, etc. And one side of that holder had adhesive, and I stuck it on my helmet as intended (and would get new holders from Cycle Gadgets, whenever I got new helmets).

I used to think that was a good idea, until I read a thread on this subject back in 2014, on a Victory motorcycle forum (when I owned a Vic). In particular, this post, by someone who "worked as a firefighter / EMT for about the past 15 years now," changed my thinking:


If anyone's at all interested in this subject, go ahead and read that now. I'll wait ...

For those without free time, or too lazy, the guy (who was a regular poster there, and certainly seemed to me to be legit, a stand-up guy, etc.) recommended wrist ID or dog-tag type of medical and contact info.

So, around that time, I switched to an outfit called RoadID (no affiliation, except as a customer):


I now wear a Stretch wrist ID, in a hi-viz color, although I tried some other, older, wrist straps that they had; see Choose Your Wrist Style for the list. I believe they used to offer dog-tag type of IDs, with rubber edge coverings, but I don't see them there now. I'm sure other outfits make that sort of thing, if you look around, but I prefer the wrist (and I don't wear a watch, riding or not, so that's not an issue).

That's my take.
 

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wspollack ,

Great write up Sir,

I had posted a video of a well known M/C youtuber on the topic of Rider Down and his suggestion was to put the ICE card on the back of helmet but my Canadian Bud Steve_XYZ did one better and said to put it on the top that way they didn’t have to move you to find it.......I liked his reasoning .

I’ll edit my list to include multiple flashlights.

I set a Slick Deal Alert for the 7” Knipex and will look for them at Lowe’s the next time I’m there.

In closing I just want to thank you and many others for taking the time to post these Golden Nuggets of Wisdom.
 
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wspollack ,

Great write up Sir,

I had posted a video of a well known M/C youtuber on the topic of Rider Down and his suggestion was to put the ICE card on the back of helmet but my Canadian Bud Steve_XYZ did one better and said to put it on the top that way they didn’t have to move you to find it.......I liked his reasoning .

I set a Slick Deal Alert for the 7” Knipex and will look for them at Lowe’s the net time I’m there.

In closing I just want to thank you and many others for taking the time to post Golden Nuggets of Wisdom.
Oh blah blah. Your list was just as good as mine. We're probably brothers from different mothers.
 

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Oh blah blah. Your list was just as good as mine. We're probably brothers from different mothers.

That Darn Milk Man 😂

But you took the time to break it down .... Thank You.
 
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I would have never thought about wheel bearings. But as of late when I lean past a 50° angle, just before my knee puck touches down, I'm hearing a light groaning sound in the front end. I suppose that would be bearing noise. Hmmmmm. I also noticed when I'm just getting going from a stop, and accelerating slowly … at a slow speed, I get a bit of a wobble from the front wheel / tire. But I suspect that to be a balance or tire issue. That wobble is very slight and goes away with faster speeds.

But is the groan a bearing worn out or going bad? Or is it normal?
 

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I would have never thought about wheel bearings. But as of late when I lean past a 50° angle, just before my knee puck touches down, I'm hearing a light groaning sound in the front end. I suppose that would be bearing noise. Hmmmmm. I also noticed when I'm just getting going from a stop, and accelerating slowly … at a slow speed, I get a bit of a wobble from the front wheel / tire. But I suspect that to be a balance or tire issue. That wobble is very slight and goes away with faster speeds.

But is the groan a bearing worn out or going bad? Or is it normal?
I'm far from an expert on this stuff, and could certainly be wrong, but I would suspect that a leaned-over, noise-only, situation is the result of tires, not bearings.

That is, when leaned over the tires will have different siping depth than when straight up, and also will have a different amount of cupping (if any) than at lesser angles. It's been my experience that tires will make more noise leaned over than when straighter, pretty much all of the time.

A bearing problem, OTOH, will result in a wobbling wheel problem (although it, too, will result in its own noise).

That's my take, anyway.
 

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Hmmmmm. Well, that sounds reasonable. I thought it was a bearing hum because it sounds like it is being transmitted (or maybe I'm just feeling as well as hearing it) up through the forks. But like your description, tire sounds would transmit in the same or similar way. I'll keep my eye on it.

Believe it or not, I'm slap wearing out the rear tar, quickly. Darn near the TWI. I may have to go ahead and procure its replacement.
 

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A heavy right wrist will always equal heavy rear tire wear. ;)
 

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I believe it. And my rear tar is chicken stripped to the point, it is almost CT flat in the middle. So the transition should not be a big deal.
 

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A heavy right wrist will always equal heavy rear tire wear. ;)
I just can’t help it... I just luv seeing all them big pick-up trucks in my rear view mirror.
 
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