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whats the correct torque on battery bolts? (2009 400)
tom......I dont think anyone uses a torque wrench for battery bolts......snug em up but not crazy tight will do it....... believe me!
 

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Use a Phillips head screwdriver in the bolt heads and make them as tight as you can.

Precise torque is not really important for battery bolts or 99% of the fasteners on a Burgman, or quite frankly any piece of machinery. :)
 

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Google be your friend, if not find on the net no such thing exist.
 

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precise torque is very important for battery bolts because they easily strip if over tightened
Not if you tighten them using a screwdriver, you'll never be able to generate sufficient torque to strip them just using your wrist.
 

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Tighten it up 'til it snaps, then back it off a half turn.
HAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.!!!!!!!! Great advice!!! THAT is exactly what I do..;);)
 

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Use a Phillips head screwdriver in the bolt heads and make them as tight as you can.

Precise torque is not really important for battery bolts or 99% of the fasteners on a Burgman, or quite frankly any piece of machinery. :)
Whilst I don't disagree completely with your statement regarding battery bolts, you are clearly not an engineer! It's easy to strip the threads on battery bolts as the bolts and captivated nuts are light alloy and mild steel mixed. It also depends on the size of screwdriver you use. As an ex-tech/engine design engineer and airframe fitter, I have to disagree. The number of 'home' maintained machines we had in the workshop with stripped threads to sort out was enormous, and precisely because owners had no idea how to tighten nuts and bolts properly and hadn't apparently heard of a torque wrench. Even those that did use a torque wrench set to the correct torque often had loaded the threads with grease or oil and stripped the threads not realising that lubing threads can and usually will cause over torquing. Torque wrench(s) are the most important part of any techs toolkit. But that's not to say you use it on everything. Some fasteners just don't need it as manufacturers don't always specify a torque value. Just use common sense!

Incidentally, you cannot compare fitting aircraft rivets with torquing nuts and bolts. Aircraft rivets and rivet guns are made to a specific standard and are calibrated to snap at the correct fitment pressure. It's important to use the correct type, size and standard of rivet on any aircraft panelling. That's why engineers are highly trained in that area!
 

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Whilst I don't disagree completely with your statement regarding battery bolts, you are clearly not an engineer! It's easy to strip the threads on battery bolts as the bolts and captivated nuts are light alloy and mild steel mixed. It also depends on the size of screwdriver you use. As an ex-tech/engine design engineer and airframe fitter, I have to disagree. The number of 'home' maintained machines we had in the workshop with stripped threads to sort out was enormous, and precisely because owners had no idea how to tighten nuts and bolts properly and hadn't apparently heard of a torque wrench. Even those that did use a torque wrench set to the correct torque often had loaded the threads with grease or oil and stripped the threads not realising that lubing threads can and usually will cause over torquing. Torque wrench(s) are the most important part of any techs toolkit. But that's not to say you use it on everything. Some fasteners just don't need it as manufacturers don't always specify a torque value. Just use common sense!

Incidentally, you cannot compare fitting aircraft rivets with torquing nuts and bolts. Aircraft rivets and rivet guns are made to a specific standard and are calibrated to snap at the correct fitment pressure. It's important to use the correct type, size and standard of rivet on any aircraft panelling. That's why engineers are highly trained in that area!

As a retired aircraft man i agree with these sentiments.
 

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Wow, aviators prefer Burgies?! It has to be some fuselage, hasn't it :D
So, gents is it a good idea to lubricate dry nuts and adjust torque according to some chart, or the new value might already be too inaccurate?
 

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Hi guys, just poking a little fun. ;)

QM and Muse, being a regular viewer of "Air Crash Investigation" I am well aware of the precision requirements for fitting and torqueing rivets, and BTW I actually am an engineer - just not a mechanical engineer.

When it comes to torqueing bolts, in 40+ years of working on cars and bikes as a hobby, I have not used a torque wrench nor do I deem one necessary for the average home motorcycle mechanic, especially not for performing a task as basic as tightening battery lead bolts.

Having said that I admit that initially I did snap a few bolts (which is as much a commentary on the poor quality steel used by Japanese manufacturers in the '60s and early '70s as it is on my skills) but it didn't take me long (a month or so) to work out by feel just how much a particular size bolt/nut combo should be tightened. In those days torque wrenches were expensive and few people could justify the expense - including most bike repair shops.

As an example of what can be done using minimal tools, on one memorable occasion 35 years back I managed to teardown and rebuild an RD350 motor in a motel room in Nairobi (after I had disintegrated the piston skirts as a result of water ingestion when crossing a crocodile infested river) using nothing more than a spark plug spanner, Phillips head screw driver, pair of pliers and a shifting spanner (the rest of the toolkit had been lost in the said same river) - and yes, the bike still runs today! :)

Finally, a few years ago when prices came down to a reasonable level I did purchase a torque wrench and it has been sitting on my tool shelf unused in its original packaging ever since, except for two or three occasions when I tested it just to confirm my hand feel was accurate.

So if anyone in Melbourne is looking for a bargain priced torque wrench in as new condition, just PM me. :cool:
 

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Find on Yuasa battery product/specification sheet, torque to 9.4 N-m, this = about 80 in-lb or 7 ft-lb for battery bolt.
 

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Wow, aviators prefer Burgies?! It has to be some fuselage, hasn't it :D
So, gents is it a good idea to lubricate dry nuts and adjust torque according to some chart, or the new value might already be too inaccurate?
Hi buddy, no...usually best to always torque dry unless there is a specific manufacturers requirement for either thread lock, which obviously will have a lubricating effect during the torquing process (the manufacturer will have factored in the lube effect to the torque figure). Or, the torque figure states that the threads must be lubricated prior to torquing. In virtually all other cases, it's always a dry figure. Reducing the torque figure from it's actual required setting on a lubed thread may be dangerous in critical areas as the nut or bolt may come loose over time.

The few times some light lube may be required are when a thread may be very corroded and dirty. So cleaning it and using a small amount of lube would be acceptable in some circumstances. Without lube this situation would cause the specified torque value to not be enough to safely lock the components to the intended value, even though the correct torque is being applied. The torque wrench would reach it's value trying to overcome the corrosion resistance before the components are fully locked together at the correct tension.
 

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Jeeeeeeeeeeeez.........Tightening up a battery bolt is NOT ....rocket science!!

Next thing that someone will ask is - " What are the torque values for the valve caps on the tires?"...............................
 

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...usually best to always torque dry
Hi mate -- yeah i suspected that, but dry threading doesn't last very long and all those crankcase cover (those dry as martini) and inside bolts and nuts require more frequent access than manual says, at least if to care about good clutch and variator performance. And the worst is they are not replaceable.
 
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