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Personally I think that Suzuki will find a way to either return in a few years with a new bike named Burgman after some time off or secretly unbeknownst to us are already working on a new maxi scooter (with a new name) that will meet emissions in all markets. I do understand that the trend in motorbikes of all stripes has been smaller displacement engine size, but something tells me that bike manufacturers will understand the need of scooters to have a larger motor size category, particularly since the B650, T-Max, and Silverwing were all among the most successful scooters sold to first world nations.
 

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I hope they do come up with something to fill the vacancy left by the big burger. The platform has been around for a long time so somebody must have been buying them for them to stay so long.
 

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I'm not an expert in vehicle markets and production at all, but i suspect that the electric migration may have some importance; i think that motorbikes, and scooters in particular, have to jump on the electric engine wagon, but doing it WELL and at the right time is very hard: someone will do it too early and the project will fail, someone too late (resulting in competitors instead of leaders of the new market) and the line between the success and the failure is very thin. New tecnologies (like graphene batteries) may become available suddenly or with unpredictable delay....
.... what i mean is that i can imagine Suzuki engeneering evaluating how much a new internal combustion project can be kept alive (so how much can it pay itself) vs. a jump in the electric world taking the risk of a total failure.
Imho :)
 

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I'm not a fan of this trend where everything electric is getting 'rushed' to market, often before it's all good & ready. Especially not motorbikes. There are still limitations in range, access to recharge stations, cost of replacement batteries, etc. Not to mention that electric vehicles are not as "green" as they'd have you think. Lithium ion elements come from huge gaping hole-in-the-ground strip mines and old, dead batteries are environmental nightmares in the disposal process. Not to mention the electrical grid used to power & recharge the things often comes from power plants that still use 'dirty' fossil fuels to run them, so the net carbon footprint ends up the same anyway--just at a different end of the process. And while cars and trucks are used for transportation of people and goods, motorbikes (even in countries where they are utilitarian, ie Malaysia) still have a pleasure/speed/power/brawny sound factor to them that would put them lower down on the list for the ideal candidates to be 'electrified'. Certainly the trend to go electric, while admirable, will get nothing but cussing from me if I find out that was directly linked to the Burgman 650's demise.
That said, I'd love to eventually get something electric or alternative powered. I still have many years of life left and feel the things will be perfected in time for me to witness. But it seems like everyone is jumping on board because there must be a profit to be reaped somewhere. Innovation never occurs unless someone stands to make a profit somehow. Growing up, I'd hear about alternative fuels and electric for years and always chuckled about how it never ever seemed to get serious. And yet great strides have finally come. But if electric gets perfected by, let's say 2030, I have to ask why couldn't Suzuki hold out their maxi-scooter line until just shy of then and not get so over-enthused that they shut the line down too many years before then.
 

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I'm all for electric, too. If I cruise on the Burgman with ear plugs and a helmet, the 650 sounds electric, which is a nice fantasy.

I took my BMW 650 GT scooter into the dealer last weekend for a recall. I had time to kill so I asked a sales lady about BMW's electric scooter. She said there was a fair amount of interest from customers but not a lot of push from BMW to get them into dealerships. She also said the cost of special tools was huge and hard to justify if there wasn't enough electric business to recoup the investment.
 

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I blame this on Elon Musk. That stinker has every automaker scrambling to go electric. Bicycles too are going electric. It's harder for motorcycles because the sound and the look of the engine are important sales features. For scooters, it's an obvious upgrade. Drive components are hidden and nobody cares what's under there anyway. Why develop a new gasoline engine at a time like this?
For one, that battery will only get you so far, and a 45 minute charge like a Tesla is insane. Would you wait 45 minutes to get gas? I wouldn’t.
Petroleum based engines will be around for a long time.
 

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Personal take on this -- ICE sucks, and in a very big way. It's just a ridiculously ancient tech. And frankly it's a crime to burn a non-reproducible and accumulated for million years planet reserve, which is a valuable source for so much stuff. Besides it consumes oxygen, i.e. same element that supports life. But it's only a machine for heavens sake, what kind of mind produces a machine that takes away vital resource from the author.

New technologies for electric power have already been found. Not only they are cleaner, but allow to process the dangerous waste from previous mishaps. They also have energy supply potential for decades ahead. Sound of ICE exhaust sell the gas bikes? Once Ev receive due attention and support, would love to see those who trade low maintenance, vastly more powerful, quiet, oxygen-, altitude-, water-, dirt-proof machine in for one that makes popping sound, which in fact could also be reproduced with a simple playing card inserted into wheel.

However they won't adopt those technologies since it would cardinally change military balance in the world. This is a different story thou.
 

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They can't burn organics and coal anymore -- it's not enough to go electric. At the same time they refuse to develop new technologies to produce clean and affordable electric energy because it interferes with military ambitions. If they managed to resolve this, shortage of Li would hardly be a problem, it might not be even dependent on it at all. But resolving looks too good to be true.
 
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