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My concern is I’m seeing more and more of soldiers riding bikes wearing their camouflage uniforms. It’s hard enough for bike riders to be seen so adding camouflage to the equation can’t help. Not sure exactly what way would be best to convey this message to these important men and women but I thought maybe members, as fellow bikers would be able to pass along some good advice, try to be as visible as possible while on the road.

thoughts and thanks
 

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A reflective vest would work... or would that constitute being out of uniform??




Eric
 

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Sttarbuck said:
My concern is I’m seeing more and more of soldiers riding bikes wearing their camouflage uniforms. It’s hard enough for bike riders to be seen so adding camouflage to the equation can’t help. Not sure exactly what way would be best to convey this message to these important men and women but I thought maybe members, as fellow bikers would be able to pass along some good advice, try to be as visible as possible while on the road.
thoughts and thanks
They must be sneaking around Off Base......
ain't gonna get away with that On Base.
Safety Vest &/or Safety Jacket is Required On Base.
DOD rules. Our CenTex PGR people get reminded
regularly by the folks at Fort Hood.
 

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Okay, I've just got to ask.... if they were wearing camouflage how did you see them? Wouldn't it look like a bike was driving itself?!? :lol:

Sorry, couldn't resist!

SHAWN :)
 

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Okay, some clarification here- Actually the regulation (Army) requires a reflective BELT. (This may be Fort Campbell exclusively, I dont have the regulation in front of me, and the wording may vary between Army facilities.) If you were to go by the letter of the law, the vest is actually not authorized, but that makes no sense at all, and many people wear the orange vests instead of just the reflective PT belt that is the standard.
In light of the number of young soldiers getting into POM (Privately Owned Motorcycle) accidents, the army has gotten very involved in motorcycle safety of late. It is now required that every rider take the MSF basic rider course, and is, on most posts, provided at no cost. In addition, the uniform requirement mandates a DOT approved helmet, boots or shoes that cover the ankle, full length shirt and pants, and of course, the reflective belt.
Now, my friends and I, being pilots, like to argue about the intent vs the wording of the regulations and we have had long discussion about how, if the army is going to mandate a clothing standard such as a reflective belt or high boots, why not go ahead and mandate something that will provide some protection like a riding jacket, etc. But of course that goes nowhere, and is just an argument among friends.

The gist of this is that if a soldier is involved in a POM accident, and is not wearing the proper PPE (personal protective equipment) and requires medical attention off-post, that soldier will be paying the bills out of his or her own pocket. Tri-Care (our government health insurance provider) has decreed that they will not pay for medical bills associated with such an accident if it is proven that the soldier was not wearing the proper PPE, despite being given direct orders (via memorandum) to do so. In addition, if caught, you will receive a ticket from the military police, and if crossing a checkpoint into post or a secured area such as an airfield, you most likely will not be allowed to enter without the proper riding equipment.

If you have seen a soldier riding without his reflective belt, you are seeing an anomoly in my experience, and he probably just forgot to put it on for that ride, but it is certainly not the standard, nor a normal case.

As for wearing the uniform while riding, you are correct- it certainly does not help our visibility, but I think that as the uniform meets the letter of the law, as far as the army is concerned, you will find few, particularly in hot weather that will be willing to put a protective jacket over top of it, or take the time to swap tops.

Just my 2c.

CW2 Jason Richards

ps- everyone got a good laugh at my "gay" scooter when I did the MSF course and all over post a couple of years back. Nobody's laughing now.
 

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The safety requirements on and off base are now a DOD instruction, thus standardizing requirements across all bases and facilities. They apply to active, reserve, retired and regular ol' civilians (I am of the retired Navy variety).

I wear a Joe Rocket (Crash) Jacket in addition to all the other required stuff, which gets **** hot in Southern Mississippi. I forgot my strap-on, er I mean my yellow strap one morning, and they wouldn't let me on base unless I had a long sleeve shirt. After pissing around with the gate guards for several minutes, I took off my crash jacket and agreed to wear only my long sleeved, cotton shirt, they finally let me on. (I promise, if I'd been hit and injured on base while sitting on that crash jacket, I would have sued everyone from the gate guard to SECDEF.)

Bottom line appears to be that DOD is concerned about visibiity and not safety. IMHO, the DOD motorcycle policy is just another instruction written by someone who really doesn't know what they are talking about. I take the strap off as soon as I get off base- (1) my personal safety is my personal responsibility, and (2) being old enough to have fought for this country, and having lived through fighting for this country, if I don't want a dork strap, I won't wear it (other than on base).


{And for that CWO2 Army Pilot, how funny is it that you can fly a helicopter, shoot missiles, monitor radar, track troops and targets, monitor plane status, but you can't drive a POV and use a cell phone at the same time on base?}
 

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I find the concern about wearing camouflage on a motorcycle contributing to reduced visibility a flawed line of reasoning. The camouflage is designed to be cryptic in natural environs, not in an urban setting. Therefore, the use of "camouflage" against a background other than what it is designed for, it is no longer camouflage! Pink stripes wouldn't be cryptic in the jungle, but they certainly would be against a pink striped wall.

Nevertheless, I agree with the spirit of the post, regardless of the technicalities. I live in SE Virginia, the greatest concentration of military bases in the world, and I've done some contracting work at Langley AFB. The recent requirements for the MSF class has hit hard here, due to the number servicemen deaths on zoom-splats. Despite there being a helmet law, I've seen a lot of people dying while not wearing any helmet! The reflective belts are ubiquitous here.
 

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Be more worried about them going back to Iraq for their 3rd and 4th tours than them riding around town in cammo.
 

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Here at Cannon Air Force Base you must wear a "brightly colored" vest or jacket and arms must be covered with sleeves. I wear an armored black mesh jacket that has bright blue and white stripes and all kinds of reflective stripes or I don't get into work each day. You must also wear boots that go above the ankles, gloves and long pants (doesn't matter if they are armored/leather). You must wear a helmet with a visor or safety glass eye protection, even if you have a windshield.

The guys wearing ABU's stand out while driving with their gear on. Most of 'em can't wait to get OUT of ABU's and into civvies, so for the most part they aren't wearing them without protective/reflective gear off base while riding - at least in this area.
 
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