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Discussion Starter #1
I got my shiny new Burgman 650 manual in the mail. (Took 4 months)
I thought I would do a little light reading tonight. Whoah !, talk about
some complex circuits.

The Camshaft position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, air intake pressure sensor, throttle position sensor, engine coolant temperature sensor, speed sensor, intake air temp sensor, atmospheric pressure sensor, tip over sensor, air intake control valve, heated oxygen sensor, cvt pulley position sensor, cvt speed position sensor, cvt secondary pulley revolution sensor, cvt engine revolution sensor, cvt throttle position sensor , etc, etc, etc come all together to a rather large computer
in the fairing.

I gather this is all self testing and will give you a simple "FI" idiot
light on the dash if anything is amis. But what then. Please call
NASA.

I can remember when bikes consisted of steel, aluminum, leather, rubber and fire to make them go.

I just didn't realize the underlying complexity to make the Burger outwardly "simple" to ride.
 

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The same thing can be said for todays cars and trucks. Gone are the days when all you needed to work on vehicles are basic tools.
 

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Monterey10 said:
I can remember when bikes consisted of steel, aluminum, leather, rubber and fire to make them go.
Yep. Turn on fuel petcock. Set manual choke lever. Push prime button on carb a couple of times. Pre-crank starter pedal to position engine at compression point. Turn on ignition. (If it was a big single you might have to pull the compression release lever in.) Now, give the starter lever a mighty kick. If you got everything just right, it might start. If it backfired, it might break your ankle. If it did nothing, well, fiddle with the choke setting and maybe push the prime button once more, and try again. And again. Now, wasn't that fun? :roll: Yeah, in a way it was. You got a true feeling of accomplishment from simply starting the beast.

That was 50's and early to mid 60's. The Japanese 2 strokes rolled in. Still kick start, but with so little compression that you could even crank them with your arm. By the early 80's kick starters and prime buttons were gone, along with the street 2-strokes. A great time to be riding. The Japanese had overproduced and flooded the market. New bikes were cheap - and they were very good motorcycles.

Now we are in a completely different era. As long as all the complex technology works - life is good. And actually the stuff is highly reliable. Bikes have never performed so well, handled and stopped so proficiently, or been so easy to ride. But, if the workings behind the current technology seem intimidating - just wait a few years. :twisted: I'm talking maybe three years - not ten. The next phase is already on the drawing boards...
 

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I can remember when motor bikes didn't even have engines - they were just bikes in those days - Bloody big front wheel and a teensy weensy little one at rear! Those were the days - things were much simpler :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
reseblence

I noticed the resemblence Norm..... :lol: :lol:
 
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