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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I have finally decided on a scooter and either a 400 or 650 Burgman. My rides will be short and not faster than 45 mph. So I think the 400 will be more than enough even if I occasionally hit the highway.

So now I have the opportunity to get a 2008 400 with 2800 miles. The cost is a bit lower than 3k.

Now the questions.

I don't know anything about bikes/scooters, and I am not mechanically inclined. Would I be better off getting a new bike with dealership support? Any idea how I determine if this 400 is in good shape? How best to get the thing home?

I am trying to find an experienced rider to go with me.

Thanks for listening.
 

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Sounds like you're on the right track. You're right, it would bea huge help if an experienced rider came with you.
 

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Mekan-
Let folks know where you are and you may find someone to step up and help you out.;)
 

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Welcome to the site Mekan. Good choice of bike, but I would say that wouldn't I!

If you can get an experienced rider to go with you that would be the way to go. Especially if that person knows about the Burgman 400. They are genuinely great bikes with few flaws but the usual rules apply when buying any machine. For example: Look for evidence of servicing. Has it been dealer maintained? Or owner maintained? Does the bike look in good condition and does the engine start and run ok and does is make any strange noises? Does the bike move off smoothly? Look at the condition of the oil (level and dirtiness) and make sure the engine coolant level is fine. Check the brake fluid levels and brake hoses are ok and the brakes work. Just look for anything that is obviously not right. At such low miles the bike is unlikely to have problems with steering head bearings or such like so as long as the coolant and hoses are ok then get that test ride (wear the right gear) and see what you think.

A dealer new machine is always good and comes with guarantees, but at much more cost. For a first bike your deal could be the one to go for if it's ok. A great machine to learn about scoots.

I wish you good luck and post back with what you find.
 

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not saying don't buy the bike, not saying it's a bad deal or anything , but reading the narrative, I wonder, have you ridden before? is this your first motorcycle/big scooter? have you taken the motorcycle safety classes? at 45 mph and short distances the 650 is definitely out, and I fear the 400 may be way way more than you need, but if you get it you will find yourself looking for longer and longer trips to take and you will grow into each other, as for tips is the cvt the transmission original equipment or has it been modified with sliders or different clutch? does clutch make a noise when engaging? some bikes do this and some people can't stand it, we really need to know bike location too. to determine things like tire rot or no, rust, animals, insects, was it stored properly. tell us a better story and we can tell you some better lies :p
 

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Regradless of who you buy it from.. yiou can, of course, bring it to any Suzuki dealer for service.. just no warranty if purchased from an individual unless he purchased an extended warranty that can be transferred..
 

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mikeyMarine makes a good point. My first scooter was a Honda Elite 70cc to toodle around the neighborhood. Two months later I bought a new Burg 400 'cause I wanted to ride Pacific Coast Hwy and the Santa Monica mtns near my home.

Next big surprise was my wife enjoyed riding pillion, and we took our first overnight trip to San Diego. Our next one, a 3-day, was to San Simeon. We realized that touring was something we wanted to do often, so I bought a Burg 650 (kept the 400 as my 'city' bike). I'm now on my second bike of each model, and will get a new 650 either next year of 2015.

The 400 is definitely the right bike for you, and the one you're looking at sounds promising. You might also want to research the new Honda Forza (300cc) coming out later this year. Also, the Burgman 200 may be coming to the US in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
First, thanks for the replies. They have all been helpful. Being squeamish and not knowing what the **** I am looking at, I have decided to go with a new 400 from a local dealer. I am paying a premium for the hand holding I know.

Why the Burgman? My commute is short and has relatively low speeds, but it also has big hills. I am 6'4" and 300 LBS so less than a 300 sounds like it would be under powered. I looked at the Forza closely, but I fit better on the Burgman, and the Burgman has a bit more power. Also, everywhere I go for research people adore their Burgmans. Luckily for me I don't anticipate ever having a second on the scooter.

I am not intimidated by a clutch, but the on and go of a scooter sounded right for a commuter bike. I did struggle deciding between a scooter and a smallish motorcycle. In the end storage, simplicity, and slightly better weather protection won the day.

As for training, the dealer is throwing in our Missouri mandated training/license with the scooter. I will not ride the streets until licensed and trained. Then it will be neighborhood runs until I feel comfortable. Then my first work runs will be against / with light traffic.

My next issue is finding the right riding gear for a big guy. Boots and helmet I don't think I will have a problem with, but jacket and maybe pants will be a tougher find. Do you all ride wearing a full kit of protective gear?
 

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I ride with most of the stuff.
Full-face helmet, boots, armored mesh jacket, mesh gloves.
Under the seat I'll always have rain suit, treads, rain gloves.
Once the temps start to head below 70F I'll start adding layers until it hits the 40's and then I'll bring out the cold stuff.

I ride 65-70 miles every weekday, rain or shine.

As for the 'kit', I think it is as much about presenting the appearance that you take riding and safety seriously. If you don't look like you care, motorists around you won't be as likely to care either. Saw a guy this morning wearing a Hi-Vis vest, no helmet, sandals and shorts. Made me do a little mental shrug. Even with the gear, I get my share of cagers doing cager-like things. At least it makes SWMBO feel like I'm safer :rolleyes:
 

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congrats on iyour decision, and I am sure you will be amazed and happy with the 400, as far as gear, from someone who has been there and done that, more than once, you are a **** fool if you ride without a helmet and over the ankle boots/shoes as for the rest, it does a great job of protecting skin, I cannot vouch for anything else except to say WHEN you have your wreck, all the gear in the world will not stop internal injuries like broken ribs, collar bones, pelvises, spleens etc, but your helmet will keep your brain alive so you can feel the pain and worry about is your bike ok
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Boots, gloves and helmet are mandatory for me. I am fairly certain I will be getting jacket and pants as well.

I like my skin the way it is.
 

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I wear full gear, all the time except for pants when going to work. Otherwise, when I get dressed in the morning or when I get home from work, I slip on my Slider jeans and wear them all day. I always presume my next ride may be just moments away!
 
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