Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would cold temperatures be better for the engine than hot temperatures? The reason I ask is the temperature gauge on my burgman is showing about 2 bars lower riding in this cold weather than in summer. Just curious, since I know heat will decrease engine life
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,074 Posts
I would think an engine not fully warmed up is not as happy as one that is.

How many bars are showing in summer 3 ? How many now 1 ? (There are 5 on my 650)

It may take longer, but it should still get to 3 bars.

You may have a stuck thermostadt, or it's really cold (0 F). If it's that cold try blocking the radiator with card board to increase the operating temp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,876 Posts
I'm with Jim, the engine is designed to run at an optimum tempurature and too cold is probably just as bad as too hot. The thermostat and cooling system are there to keep the engine at that optimum temp.

If you're running at one bar, you might want to have it checked out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,748 Posts
An old "Hot Rodder" trick for more power was to put a 160 degree F thermostat or totally remove it. Then when technology caught up and real testing was done they found that running less than 180 F caused the piston rings to wear MUCH faster. Most newer engines run at 195-210 F (almost 100 Deg's C).

Jim, I live in the same area as kxj, its been upper 40's lower 50's and very rainey. So if it is running lower he may have a stuck thermostat. Most modern (2005 up) ones fail in an open state so the engine will not overhear and crack the head. Another issue could be a trapped air bubble in the cooling and the service manual has "Burping" instructions I am sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Well cooler temps for air cooled bikes is far different story .

Yes an air cooled bikes may and do change a bit in cooler weather .

But with a water cooled and computer driven fuel injection that would be

a far different story if its running too cool could cause a to rich or other

computer problem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Cooler weather can cause it to run a little cooler until the engine fully warms up. Depending on how long of a ride you take it might not get to full temp. It has been cooler here lately and I have noticed that my 2006 400 does not get to full temp as fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The temperature gauge is working fine but it just takes a lot longer for it to get fully warmed up to four bars
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
I thought the first-generation 400 had an analog temp gauge, not a 650-style bargraph.
My '05-400 has an analog temp. gauge,
but there are 8 gauge markers..bars...
from the cold mark on one side, to the
red warning box on the hot side.
My 'normal' temp is at the center mark (bar)...
anywhere from 1 marker lower to 1 marker higher
is not a concern to me.
Anything outside that range would be a concern
to me....something to check out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
Understand ... those are bars ... my GF's 400K6 has always taken longer to warm up than my 650 but I don't notice much difference in either bike summer/winter. Of course, "winter" in Fungus Corners is 10 months long. As with Duster's 400 the normal temp is in the center and I'd start thinking about replacing the thermostat if it doesn't get there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Engines are made to run at an optimum temperature. Colder temps waste gas.
I have a Scangauge in my 97 Saturn- running a Warm Air Intake in cold weather visibly raises MPG. The Computer puts more fuel into a cold engine.

I have been tracking my Burgman MPG since I bought it in July 2012. It gets 5 or so MPG less in the winter months. Or what passes for "winter" in Lower Alabama.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
The temperature gauge is working fine but it just takes a lot longer for it to get fully warmed up to four bars
It would take longer to come to temp if the thermostat is partially stuck open. You could tap on it to see if it would close, while you have the plastic off you might as well replace it. Remove two bolts, pull back the thermostat housing cover,pull the old one out ,new one in, put the housing cover back on and bleed the coolant line. the bleeder bolt is right there on the housing cover. About a 15 min job. once you get the plastic off.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top