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Discussion Starter #1
So, a few months into the regular commute from the East Bay into San Francisco downtown and here is what I find.

Warm weather - the warmer it is, the more MPG I get. Frankly this is weird, but I have confirmed it a few times on hot days. Not so much in trickle along traffic, but steady speeds.

As the bike is still only a few months old, I know the MPG loosens up and improves somewhat - I am now getting 55-56 mpg regularly, hauling my lard ass, and the Givi on full height mode.

1) Wet weather.

I miss my lap blanket I had for wet and snowy weather in London commuting. It was fantastic. Cant seem to find one over here. Would make the world of difference, for all of the four months or so that it is occasionally foul weather in the Bay Area.

2) Wet weather #2:

The Givi screen - water gets sucked back up under the screen and soaks the console - its very odd to look at a shower falling off the INSIDE of the AN266 windscreen. Just an airflow issue to be sure, but it spray slightly onto the rider. It deflects more than it sprays at full deflect, but it is still stranger than a one-piece screen which logically prevents that.

3) Wet weather #3:

The hand guard versus givi wide screen moulded bits question.

There is no question - NONE that in real rain, that the GIVI screen is not adequate at keeping rain and cold wind off your hands. It is not remotely as effective as hand guards.


I may just relent and get some hand guards, as other than that, the air flow and water flow is not too bad.

I realise that on full extension lock, the handlebar hand guards would clash to a small extent. Whoopee. Small price to trade for largely dry and warm(er) hands.

There are always other hand guards out there anyways too other than the Suzuki OEM ones.. but its a minor inconvenience for the vast improvement.

To all those considering the pros of an AN266 Givi screen versus another type PLUS handguards - my experience now, totally go with the hand guards = although each to their own.

Cold/wet hands = poor control of vehicle. I use Dianese gore tex winter gloves for extreme riding, and some membrane type mountain biking wet weather gloves which are not bad - but eventually wet out through the cuff downwards. The Dianese gloves are such long gauntlets with tight drawstring cuffs that this is not possible - but they are stupidly bulky.

I may consider SealSkinz or similar neoprene gloves for short downpours, easy enough to keep in the bike for occasional use..

Cheers to you all :)

Long live 56mpg and luggage carrying capacity and relatively dry and never being stuck in traffic, ever..!
 

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Cheekygrin73 said:
...
3) Wet weather #3:

The hand guard versus givi wide screen moulded bits question.

There is no question - NONE that in real rain, that the GIVI screen is not adequate at keeping rain and cold wind off your hands. It is not remotely as effective as hand guards.
...
I found hand guards did little to keep my hands warmer and drier. I thought so at first...but I think that was just the kind of improvement we get on adding any farkle to our bikes. We added this new thing, so it must be better. I even tried adding some "extensions" to the hand guards with some plastic off of milk jugs, but it didn't help. Cold wind just went over and back into the "protected" area and froze the hands.

The only thing I've found to really work well, is to install handlebar muffs. It doesn't look pretty, but it works.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nice one Daboo.
I did see a lot of them in London - usually hard core commuters, or Couriers on bashed up Honda 500s, who know the score for reliability and bullet proof things that work in extreme conditions :thumbup:

Only problem as you identified is the wind blast pushes the neoprene back onto the controls at anything over 35mph pretty much.

I fully intend to ride all year round. Barring ice on the roads, there is no good reason not to, if one is prepared, safe, visible, and riding within the limits of the conditions.

You will ALWAYS be faster, AND cheaper than a steel cage for commuting. And rewarding too!

Enjoy :)
 

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Dense foam in the front opening to keep rain and dew etc from coming in and over the dash. Hand guards are a must but you will still get wet!
 

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Lap blankets are available in US----try active Vespa shop.

Handguards do not work keeping hands dry. I have set I worked with.

Try AF266 adjustable Givi windshield, so you can look over....and move up and down.

I do have set of hand muffs I will use on extreme cold/wet trips.

SF area is not really very cold.

Aerostich has bag, 3 finger over mitts that will keep gloves dry.

I also have tried Laminar "Ears" they don't work either.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
DoubleJ said:
Dense foam in the front opening to keep rain and dew etc from coming in and over the dash. Hand guards are a must but you will still get wet!
Huh, nice one. I presume some velcro strip with a glued strip on the bottom, and another velcro strip on the foam? Or how else would you affix it on so it doesnt move in the wind shear?

All good feedback thanks :)
 

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Cheekygrin73 said:
...Only problem as you identified is the wind blast pushes the neoprene back onto the controls at anything over 35mph pretty much... :)
Here are some pictures from a tutorial I wrote up recently on installing handlebar muffs. viewtopic.php?f=26&t=59340&p=548369&hilit=+muffs#p548369




That solves the problem of how to keep the muffs from moving backwards and collapsing on the brake levers.

Chris
 

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Cheekygrin73 said:
So, a few months into the regular commute from the East Bay into San Francisco downtown and here is what I find.

Warm weather - the warmer it is, the more MPG I get. Frankly this is weird, but I have confirmed it a few times on hot days. Not so much in trickle along traffic, but steady speeds.
A 20 degree F change in ambnient temperature should result in about a 10% change in that part of your mpg related to overcoming wind resistance. Don't know if there is a change in engine efficiency also related to ambient temp. I would think maybe not for a water cooled engine. I have found the oil temp more significant than wind resistance. The first 10 miles of my commute this morning I averaged 53.6 mpg. This portion is pretty much 45 mph with 2-3 lights. The last 23 miles of my commute I averaged 71.3 mpg. 40-60 mph, 4 lights. Overall mpg 68.2 which is a pretty good commuting mpg for this trip. My running average for thelast three weeks is 66.3 mpg. I would attribute this morning's mpg to the fact that I only stopped for about 1/2 to 1/3 as many lights as I normally do and I was pretty much constantly drafting a nice flow of commuter traffic with multiple vehicles in front and at least one vehicle behind. The dividing line at 10 miles is determined as that point where I go from watching my mpg creep down to where I start seeing it creep back up.

You can calculate a pretty decent approximate mpg if you know your starting odometer, ending odometer, starting mpg (indicated reading on the dash) and ending mpg.

Where:
a = odometer start
b = odometer finish
c = mpg start
d = mpg finish

average mpg over the odometer interval:

(b - a)(c * d)
(b*c)-(a*d)

This gives a pretty close approximation to your true mpg, even though the indicated value is often off by 3% or more. This method works best if your starting odometer reading is in the range of 2-3 times your commute distance. Less than 2x and your approximation is unduly affected by the 'built in' error in the indicated mpg. More than 3x and the precision of the indicated mpg (in a classical digital system this is expressed in a % of full scale +/- 1 LSD in my experience on the IceBerg it appears to be -5% +/- 0.1 mpg ).

Other than that, I got nothing... :thumbup:
 

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My bike dropped from 60mpg to 51mpg in the last month due to the cool down, (and possibly winter gas) it was about 55* when it was down to 51mpg. The EFI was saying "I'm cold, oh no, lean too". So it feeds it more fuel.
About those hand guards, we have several different types around here for snowmobiling, and nothing works better. I never heard of them folding down against the brake lever due to wind/speed though. I always have my fingers on the brake levers anyway.
 

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here in the UK i fitted handlebar mitts to my older 400,
I used Tucana urbane R323, Although i used them in the summer i didn't wear gloves with them and the generally kept my bare hands dry and warm.....in the middle of drenching rain, hail and fog! ( yeah all in the space of 3 days lol)
I did find that holding onto the handle bar made my hands sticky.and had intended to buy some cotton gloves to cure this.
These gloves came with a reinforcing bar to try and stop the mitts crushing back onto your hands..but it was not totally successful as they did tend to droop.........however they where effective at keeping my bare hands dry and mostly warm
These folks also do an apron to fit the 400 as well.
 

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My Burgman came with the Suzuki handguards. They really aren't good. They seem to be all form and pretty weak on the function side. They aren't flared on the underside so the wind curls under too easily. There is a cut out that is right under the area where your thumb sits. The top side is very slightly flared, but not high enough so the wind just cuts onto the top of your hand, which more importantly means that the rain curls onto it, too.

I had hand guards on my old Pegaso and they were fantastic- largely due to the fact that they were more about deflecting air and objects, than looking good, but still looked OK.

I use a Tucano Urbano leg cover. This has been fantastic. I was unsure whither to go for the leg shield wind deflectors or this, but I've been quite satisfied. Works as a leg shield wind deflector in the summer and weather protection in winter. I wish there was a way to have both though, as there is still some wind that comes in at the front of the cover. It would be great to see a manufacturer put in a channel along which you could thread the front edge of a leg cover. This would improve leg protection with a fraction of the cost.

I plan to get a screen soon, but am torn as to whither to get the Givi DT or AF. I am pretty tall when I'm in the saddle, so I will probably still be looking over the top of either, but I'd like to know if anyone has used both and what they thought?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
WIND!!!

OK so crossing bridges in gusting wind is exciting - more so than on a normal motorbike. I assume all the tupperware and lack of weight contributes to the vehicle literally being shoved around on the road.

I noticed a two up chopper on the Bay Bridge this morning, not moving around an inch :(

But, on my ride to the bridge, I was a lot drier and more comfortable.. and using less fuel..!

:?
 
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