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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I'm in New Brunswick Canada and it's starting to get cold. Last year I was able to ride until December 5th. Then had to stop due to too much salt on the road.

Do any of you drive in very cold weather? I still stick with the same Oil: Mobil 10w-40. Should I use anything different for below freezing temparatures? The only part of my body that gets cold are my fingers. Any tips on how I can keep them warm. I want to drive as late as I can...Thanks in advance. :cheers:
 

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Raoul, like you, I ride in cold weather. While heated grips and gloves are nice, I haven't brought myself to using them, even in temperatures down to the teens.

I use handlebar muffs from this time of year on into the spring. One of the keys to making these work, is to block out any air flowing into them. You'll get a lot of air flowing up through the plastic covering the handlebars. So to stop that, I stuff an old rag into each end by the grips trying to make sure I block all the air...and that I don't damage anything with the screwdriver I'm using to force the rag in there with.

I then cover that with black duct tape to seal it even more. When that's done, I put on the handlebar muffs and get them positioned right. I'll then use that black duct tape to cover over the edges where the muffs attach at...again to seal out any air flowing in there.

When I'm done, I have a nice cozy place to put my hands. It's not only much warmer than using handguards, but keeps the gloves dry in rain.

Some handlebar muffs will move back because of the airflow to press against the brake levers. I used some scrap metal to fashion an "L" shaped bracket that attaches to the handlebar weight screw and sticks out beyond the brake levers. It gives me plenty of room to slip my fingers over the brake levers in a hurry.

I use Olympia Cold Throttle gloves with a glove liner inside. http://www.bing.com/shopping/olympia-43 ... &FORM=HURE The Olympia Cold Throttle glove has more insulation on the back of the hand where the blood flows...it helps keep them warmer. My liner is from REI, but most similar liners would work. http://www.rei.com/product/801672/rei-p ... ner-gloves That works down to about 30F. Below that, I change the liner to a Seirus Therma-Lux Heat Pocket Liner Gloves. http://www.rei.com/product/661608/seiru ... ner-gloves It has a pocket on the back of the hand for one of those chemical hand warmer packets. The packets are good for about 6-8 hours. If you open the packet before putting on your riding gear, it'll have a chance to warm up. When you get to the end of your commute, put it into a zip-lock plastic bag with all the air squeezed out. I've been able to use them several times that way. A large box of the chemical liners has lasted me about 4 years and I'm not half through it yet.

One more general tip...I bring my gear inside the house each night. Partly to dry it out. Largely though to have the gear start at room temperature instead of in the 30's as it would be in the garage. I save a lot of body calories that way by not having to use them to warm up the gear.

Chris
 

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when I still had mine I would ride even as far down as the low 70's before putting on the battery powered gloves and snow pants, but rode year round , bike seemed to enjoy the cooler weather as far as performance goes
 

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Discussion Starter #4
THANKS Daboo.
I really appreciate your tips and the included links. I will experiment with it. As I said my hands don't get cold just the tip of my fingers. I use snowmobile gloves, the inside is sheep wool and works pretty good. I tried hand warmers but the hand warmers will not go in the "fingers" area of the gloves...But I will try something different. Thanks for your valuable information as always. you are the best! :thumbup:
 

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Cold weather that's anything below 50 right. :lol: It's a nice 93 here right now. 8)
 

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Those liners with the pockets for heat packets might work for you. They have metal thread woven into them. The metal thread picks up the heat and distributes it through the glove.

Chris
 

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So far I've been making use of gerbing's gear for the past five years to stay warm. I currently have everything but heated socks from them. Though I usually just wear the gloves and jacket liner as I'm for lack of a better word, too fat to fit into the pants without them feeling like I'm getting squeezed in a hip vice during use. Like them for their warmth but not comfy on fit for the long haul.
 

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+1 on the heated gear. I've got heated gloves and jacket liner, and it's a great experience to be riding and feeling warm and toasty no matter the outside temp. In the winter, prior to heated gear I would arrive at my destination with numb and frozen fingers, but not any more. I have Gerbing's gear, but there are many good choices out there.

As long as you can stay warm, the only real limitation in cold weather is the road condition.
 

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I too ride all year. Last winter the coldest was -12c ( 10f ). I use Oxford HotGrips, these are good but the outside of your fingers still get cold. I have knuckle guards fitted, they are not as good as muffs, but keep most of the wind off your hands. I do not change the oil. I used to ride an early 2001 burgman, this I had to cover some of the radiator, but the later machines have a smaller radiator and although it takes much longer to warm up I have never had any issues.
 

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Check out this stuff :)

I can recommend layering with breathable base layers, followed by something warm, then windproof membranes (more expensive not always necessary).

Additional comfort - ALWAYS a good screen, and a lap blanket or similar is really the icing on the cake.

I recommend Gore-Tex gloves, ALWAYS. Living in the UK (snow, rain, ice, cold, dreich, mroe rain, a bit more rain, plus wind) teaches you not to skimp on certain things.

I also recommend the Oxford warm socks, Sidi GoreTex boots, Oxford Balaclava for very cold days, and/or Oxford Neck Warmer / or a scarf to cover the junction between your helmet and jacket.

Also - get a jacket with a wind or gore-tex or similar membrane, and all should be well.

Check these guys out:

http://www.peakscooter.com/foulweather.html
 

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57 winters of driving straight thru----some with sidecar.

Just returned from 4 day trip to Michigan. Starting point Chattanooga. Three mornings 36 degree F starting temp, yesterday 32 Lima Ohio....ending Chattanooga @ 73! 1600 miles total=55 plus mpg, cold seems to knock mileage down a little.

Only one hour of cold miserable rain---had to stop, to take off leather pants and put on jeans and reg.rain pants....stupid as I could have worn my Darien pants and not had to stop to change. Boots---Wolverine waterproof.....and they do work. Saves carrying the rubber over boots on trip and they are warm.

I used my new Darien Lite Hi Vis (second one---they seem to last about 100,000 miles) Stayed dry, but I need to figure out better, non binding under clothes------used my old feather jacket and vest under, cheat have Aerostich heated bib----plugs into lighter socket---bike handles the electric load.

There are two factors in cold weather riding----short local trips---just proper riding gear and you get there, but sitting on the scooter 8-12 hours a day-----special prep needed, always in development for me. Depending on electric, can be bad--electric stuff failure and you freeze---one time electric liner failed on me near Montery Mexico---almost frooze, had to check into $150 motel to warm up.

Made my last trip with Helmet with face shield-----those rides in to sun rise and set are dangerous----back to 3/4 helmet with duck bill and safety glasses.

Bottom line---Salt can kill your bike in winter. Older me (73) If under 40 F, roads wet and dark, no go until sun comes up and I can see what is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Drove my Burgamn to work this morning. It was minus 7 degrees celcius here in New Brunswick Canada. (about 19 farenheit). The pavement was dry. Besides the tip of my fingers being cold the rest was OK. This is the advantage of the scooter over a regular bike; as the scooter has footboards and the cold air barely gets underneath your feet. Excellent wind protection from the front windjammer and stock windsheild as well. I will keep on riding as long as I can. It's hard to say goodbye to the bike for 3 months :thumbup:
 

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I, too, rode to work this morning.

It was a brisk 59F, but with a windbreaker I found it tolerable.

No balaclava yet :thumbup:
 

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Chatman128 said:
I, too, rode to work this morning.

It was a brisk 59F, but with a windbreaker I found it tolerable.

No balaclava yet :thumbup:
donuts are better anyway
 
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