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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody!

I am a new user, and I post this message as I need help.
I think the clutch of my B400, year 2006, 30k km, is a bit worn and I consider now the possibility of replacing it. But instead of getting a new part, I want to try replacing the pads, I suppose I can say "re-padding" the clutch, but I am not sure about the expression.

The question is: anyone knows the original thickness of the pads of a new clutch?
Thanks for your comments!!!
 

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I don't know about that Manu. I've never heard of anyone repading their clutch before.

I used to have a client that manufactured Brembo brake pads, which is very similar to clutch pads. They were working with fairly nasty chemicals and high temp ovens. I'm sure the spouse wouldn't be too thrilled with you baking clutches on the good cookie pan. Lol.

Good luck with it. Let us know how it goes.
 

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I also can't see it being cheaper as the chemicals needed are probably expensive in small amounts. The part is $150 or so in the USA, that is the all three clutch pads and assembly. Don't know what the part costs there but usually parts are cheaper in Europe.
 

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When repading they usually drill the pads and mount them with deep hole scrows in order to not damaging the bell. In my case i used glow and it worked just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Than you all for your comments!!
So far my approach is theoretical, but I plan to make it real if I find the shop where they used to refurbish clutches and old brake drums (and I find out the thickness of original pads).
Original new part costs around 180 EUR, that makes around 200 dollars. And refurbishing can be around 30 EUR.
I'll let you know how far I get with it.
 

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....if I find the shop where they used to refurbish clutches and old brake drums (and I find out the thickness of original pads).
We all know that you ment brake SHOES !!!
 

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From the shop manual, which you should have in contemplating this sort of repair:



The 3.0 mm "standard" spec is the "it's OK to wait 'til next time" spec, the 2.0 mm "limit" is replace the clutch (or reface the shoes if that's your thing).

I would be wary of having a brake shop reface the shoes as "braking" and "clutching" are distinctly different actions--however snowmobilers have clutch shoes refaced all the time and it's the same duty...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Duster, thanks for the hint!, new words are always welcome for someone like me, a non-native speaker willing to learn.

Cliffyk, very good information, and thanks a lot for it. I have a workshop manual where it indicates a 2.0 mm limit, but no indication about the standard thickness.
You are right, braking and clutching are different actions, but I suppose the tech-worker at the shop will know how to repair shoes for a clutch.
 
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