Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
I have welded a steel tube on the inner of the bearing so i can hold the tube to pull the bearing out, of course you need to hammer the case from the inside but gently.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,253 Posts
As CliffyK said. You will need a bearing pulley or slide hammer and the proper size blind bearing puller collet. The service manual indicates the size collet you need is a 35MM. If you have a service manual the instructions for removing it are on page 3-55.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Or...do like I do and just use a heat gun. Get the case nice and hot and it should pop out without any problem if you just use a screw drive with a bent end to latch inside the back of the bearing. It should not need any real force. If it does, the case is not hot enough. I did one last year on an early 2002 Burgman and that's exactly the way it came out. You are less likely to do any damage that way. Same as the rear final drive bearings. They come out with just a heat gun and no nasty pulling. Put the bearings back the same way. Heat the case and drop the new bearing right in. As long as the bearing has been in the freezer for a few hours it doesn't need anything more than just a light tap with a block and rubber mallet to make sure it's fully home. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Yeah it how we do mostly all bearings in the shop for bikes. Rarely need to use a puller. Cars, that's different! I'll try to do a video of the final drive bearings that I'm going to replace on an early 400 later this year. You'll notice no pullers needed. Just the heat gun. They literally just drop out when you turn the case 'bearing side down' and give it a minor tap. Easy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Yeah it how we do mostly all bearings in the shop for bikes. Rarely need to use a puller. Cars, that's different! I'll try to do a video of the final drive bearings that I'm going to replace on an early 400 later this year. You'll notice no pullers needed. Just the heat gun. They literally just drop out when you turn the case 'bearing side down' and give it a minor tap. Easy!

Would that work also on the steering head bearings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
OK thanks for the info QM I gave the heat a try with a pulled and it fell out :). Now to take the rear apart. Makes a noise when you spin the wheel. I figure its a good time to take a look while she's apart
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,253 Posts
That noise is probably bearing #11 on the fiche I posted the link to earlier. Common problem for those to go bad. It is the idler bearing for the clutch shaft. It is only turning when the clutch is disengaged. Once the clutch locks up it is a static bearing.

Easy to replace. You can drive it out with a long punch through the center of the shaft from the other side. You do not need to take the clutch apart to replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Would that work also on the steering head bearings?
Not so well! Alloy engine and gearbox cases lend themselve to heating up very well and the bearings just drop out. That's how all pro's do it and how I was trained on my factory courses. Pullers hardly ever needed. In a steel housing heat does help but may not do the job completely without a proper puller and depending on what bike and what bearing it is, just a few taps with a bearing driver. That's because the steel housing will heat up and expand at roughly the same rate as the bearing, unlike an alloy engine case which expands exponentially more quickly than the bearing you are trying to remove. Not had to do the steering head bearing yet on any Burgman but it's easy I would imagine.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top