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I've been on vacation for the last two weeks, and we had two snows. One before Christmas and one just after. Here in Eastern NC, a light snow is like a major catastrophe. So for at least three days after each snow I had to spend my time watching the Disney channel with the kids. For the last two days, I have been FREE!!!!!!!! However, I have ridden through a lot of puddles, sand, and salt. The question is what is the best way to clean my Burgie AFTER the ride. Help.... :oops:
 

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First spray it off with your garden hose to get all the grit off, then wash the body work from top to bottom with a soft sponge and lots of soapy water. Next, take a scotch brite type nylon covered sponge and lightly go over the wheels and other metal bits with a slightly stronger cleaner that's good for removing oil/tar etc (citrus-based cleaners are great). Finally, dry the bike with a soft terrycloth towel and wax it if you wish. Then spray a little WD-40 on the footpeg joints, centerstand, sidestand and other similar metal places that you want to lubricate and or protect from salt corrosion. With 30,000 miles on the clock, my VFR800 looked almost as good thanks to this routine.
 

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I use HondaBright cleaner. It is the same as S-100, just easier to find if you have a Honda dealer nearby. You just squirt it on, let it sit for a couple of minutes, then hose it off. It works well on the wheels too. The main thing with S-100 / HondaBright is to rinse it off thoroughly. It can leave a white film if you don't. I think they also advise not to spray it directly on instruments or switches. I then lube the moving parts as mentioned in the last post. Instead of wax I use Honda Pro Cleaner and Polish which comes in a spray can. Very easy to apply and wipe off. You can use it on virtually all surfaces of the scooter (except tires). Great for cleaning windshield and helmet visor too.
 

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For Light cleaning

Honda makes a spray on cleaner, similar to Pledge, without the lemon fresh.

For light touch up, this meathod is very easy, and if it's easy, you're more likely to do it.
 

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I like to put plastic grocery bags over the controls and levers on the handlebars, and one over the exhaust pipe tip before I hose down the bike. It might be useless.
 

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Not sure it is useless, but I've never covered that stuff. I do hit all the switches with a squirt of WD40 after drying the bike or scooter. It is a water displacer, so it should suffice. As for the exhaust, I always ride the bike for a few miles after washing it. Water does collect in nooks and crannies that you aren't going to get with a towel, and that helps get rid of it. Since you are washing it because of dirty roads this time of year, that isn't practical. But I would start it and let it run until warmed up. That should take care of any moisture that gets into the exhaust, and help evaporate water from some other areas that you can't hand dry as well.

Note: I've seen the dealership blow dry bikes after washing them with an electric leaf blower. Not sure how effective that is, but I thought I'd mention it.
 

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Wasquid wrote
I like to put plastic grocery bags over the controls and levers on the handlebars, and one over the exhaust pipe tip before I hose down the bike. It might be useless.
The bike should be water proof, but somehow I don't think so.
I do the same thing, except I use a large cork for the muffler
So far for the main dirt any car wash soap works fine.
So long as you keep up with waxing :(
 

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pauljo said:
Note: I've seen the dealership blow dry bikes after washing them with an electric leaf blower. Not sure how effective that is, but I thought I'd mention it.
Hey Paul, it works great. I use either an electric or gas all the time to get the worst of the water off. Especially effective on a motorcycle to dry the engine area where it's too tight to get into all of the nooks and crannies.
Don
 

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Rust

Here is something I have been doing for years, works great.

Started with WD-40, use to spray all my biycycles, lawn mowers, snow blowers etc from time to time, especially when storing for season.

Have now switched to using the same rust proofing liquid I use on my cages.
Originally it was Rustcheck, but now I use Krown Rustproofing. Comes in spray cans for home use.

Plan to do the underside and radiator areas of my Burg when I get it, especially after a rainy ride or a wash.
This stuff displaces moisture and even keeps electrical contacts from oxidizing as they age. It creeps.

I've seen some pretty rusty looking "under tupperware" pictures on here lately.
Can't have the top side all pretty and mung collecting underneath now can we? :(

Good for brake cables too. Excellent bicycle chain lube.

Sort of a high viscosity WD-40. :wink:
 

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Washing

Wasquid said:
I like to put plastic grocery bags over the controls and levers on the handlebars, and one over the exhaust pipe tip before I hose down the bike. It might be useless.
No not useless.
I was sitting on a 650 in the dealers showroom a few days ago and noticed rust on the hinge area of the right brake lever.
This is a brand new 650, never even been ridden as far as I can tell.

Put baggies on and spray WD-40 or something similar on these areas after a wash or wet ride.
Any other areas that might be prone to rust as well. It's far easier to prevent rust than it is to remove it.

Even the exhaust pipe area will get rusty if not kept after.
It will smell bad if you get any on the pipes, but at least with Krown Rustproofing it's safe enough.
I have my car done every year and they always get overspray on the exhaust and it stinks for a while and smokes, but does no harm.
 

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Thanks for the tips Rick. Can I get that stuff at Canadian Tire?
 

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allwalk said:
Thanks for the tips Rick. Can I get that stuff at Canadian Tire?
WD-40, yes naturally.
Rust check, yes I have seen it there.
Krown, you have to go to a Krown Rust proof dealer, but they are everywhere.
 

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Hi Illian. I thought I saw rust around the brake handles the day I bought the Scooter. The Scooter was crated till I purchased it so rust seemed unreasonable. After further investigation, I beleive it was lube applied at the factory. Does anyone agree?

Also, peridically clean out the middle compartment in the dash. It has a wsep hole in the back to allow water out . It is also allows sand and grit in. I have to clean mine out every once in awile.

I was in my glory today. Rode the Scooter to the gym and back, rode the Harley later for the fun of it...... Don Fuzzy
 

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I prefer to use Spectro Spray & Polish. It can be used on everything but the tires. Love the stuff. 8)
 

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don fuzzy said:
...I thought I saw rust around the brake handles the day I bought the Scooter. The Scooter was crated till I purchased it so rust seemed unreasonable. After further investigation, I beleive it was lube applied at the factory. Does anyone agree?
I noticed what looked like rust on mine after washing it at the local coin-op car wash when I first got it. (I hadn't looked very closely before that.)

Whether it was some kind of lube or actual rust I don't know, but I don't see it any more.

I'll check with a magnet tonight to be sure, but I think the brake levers are aluminum, not steel, and thus won't rust (but can corrode given time/conditions).
 

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Brian said:
...I'll check with a magnet tonight to be sure, but I think the brake levers are aluminum, not steel, and thus won't rust (but can corrode given time/conditions).
I just did my magnet test, and the brake levers are non-ferrous, but the knobs for adjusting the brake lever positions are magnetic and thus possibly prone to rust.

I keep my bike outdoors (no garage) and don't have a cover yet; but even after 9 months I have no visible rust. I wash it regularly at a car wash using the spray foam and the wax, and follow with the Honda one-step cleaner/polisher, so that may be helping.
 

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don fuzzy said:
Hi lilleyen. I thought I saw rust around the brake handles the day I bought the Scooter. The Scooter was crated till I purchased it so rust seemed unreasonable. After further investigation, I beleive it was lube applied at the factory. Does anyone agree?
Don, thank you, you were right.

I returned to the dealers today (putting some more money on my layaway 2004 blue an650) :) , and took a closer look at the showroom model I mentioned that had rust on the brake levers, based on your comments.

It IS brown rust coloured GREASE.

I think you may be right about the aluminum levers too.

I would assume though, that the pins and springs in the levers are steel.
These will have to be kept lubricated and rustproofed.

I am going to pick up another spray can of Krown or Rustcheck soon.
Going to spray the underside, radiator, frame pipes etc., while it's still brand new!

Can't wait to get my new burg delivered to my house and check it's oil levels and tire pressures and front wheel bolts and center stand bolts and, brake lights and turn signals, and, and ................

Then go for my first ride :D

Then bring it home and polish the hell out of it, and maybe just sit down and look at it for a while, with a big stupid grin on my face. :D :D
 
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