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as with everything else, things will go faster and get easier after the first try

removing the leg side cover is pretty straight forward, takes me about 5-10 minutes depending
on how focused I am

I usually lay down on the side of the scoot to take the cvt filter over off, once the bolts are removed
you will have to use some finesse to disconnect the cover from the floor board

the rest is easy peasy

Tip: next time you have the floor board off, cover the air intake with some breathable mesh, like the one use for screen doors, that will keep any debris from falling in, mainly loose grass or small rocks
 

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I clean mine every time I change the oil. Cooling air flow to the belt is important for long belt life. A clogged filter inhibits that air flow.
recently bought my burgman and going through the process of changing all the fluids,plugs and greasing the bearings etc and i think thats a good bit of advice regards to cleaning the filter because i wonder how many times it gets overlooked
 

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recently bought my burgman and going through the process of changing all the fluids,plugs and greasing the bearings etc and i think thats a good bit of advice regards to cleaning the filter because i wonder how many times it gets overlooked
Let us know how you make out with that top right bolt :)
 

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A long shaft nut driver (looks like a screwdriver with a socket on the end) makes getting that bolt out easier. I don't have much problem getting it out or putting it back in.
 

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Let us know how you make out with that top right bolt :)
If I can manage to change the plugs in a reliant robin without hacking a hole out of the interior (think you need to be from the UK to know what I meam😁) this must be a piece of cats pee
 

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I don't know why you guys all seem to have so much trouble removing the four bolts that hold the CVT filter cover in place. That top right bolts is easy to get to with an 8mm socket 1/4" drive and extension if you just remove the two screws that hold the air intake to the cover and just swing it far enough to put the socket onto the bolt. As far as the electrical wiring on the lower left bolt, check you wire routing, I have zero interference.
 

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There are two bolts deliberately left off my 650, the top right on the CVT filter cover and the front bolt on the transmission cover. Makes life so much easier.:)
Do your self 1 more and use a hole saw to cut a 2” hole in the cover below the transmission oil drain. You can get a cap to cover the hole online. Anytime you can avoid removing Tupperware do it!
 

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Do your self 1 more and use a hole saw to cut a 2” hole in the cover below the transmission oil drain. You can get a cap to cover the hole online. Anytime you can avoid removing Tupperware do it!
It wouldn't be difficult for Suzuki to design-in small features like this to make routine maintenance much quicker and easier. One has to wonder if it is somewhat intentional to encourage using the dealer for the maintenance items.
 
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It wouldn't be difficult for Suzuki to design-in small features like this to make routine maintenance much quicker and easier. One has to wonder if it is somewhat intentional to encourage using the dealer for the maintenance items.
DING DING DING. WINNER WINNER, CHICKEN DINNER
 
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It wouldn't be difficult for Suzuki to design-in small features like this to make routine maintenance much quicker and easier. One has to wonder if it is somewhat intentional to encourage using the dealer for the maintenance items.
I worked as a design engineer at Toyota (Technical Center, MI.). I will hazard to guess that the group doing the design of the scooters don't take into account the D-I-Y mentality of the people of other countries (especially the U.S.A.). Generally speaking in Japan, nearly all of the people have their vehicles serviced by a private garage or the original dealer. They barely have a place to park their cars, and are not allowed to work on them in their parking spaces. They don't have any or very little choice for service and repair, it must be done commercially. So, they don't have the mindset that of a person why can and will do it themselves. We battled that at Toyota, that "must take it to the dealer" mindset … on the Camry. And there are a brazillion Camrys made compared to the 7 Burgmans made per year. So, IMO, I don't think it's a strategy that they use to try to get a person to go to the dealer, they just expect that's the case (same as theirs) that it will be taken to the dealer always.

Just like my mindset of being shocked at how the very smart and capable (Japanese) mechanical engineers had never even popped the hood of their cars. I ask why not? They would reply, why should I? It was eye opening. They were shocked at all the things I did to my car at my home. Love those Japanese guys / engineers. One of the many things I learned at Toyota is that, they listen to their customers, and believe in the saying of, "when in Rome, do as the Romans." Very smart engineers and bidnessmen. I also worked for the Koreans at Hyundai-Kia in the same capacity. The Korean engineers … meh, nothing to write home about. They're halfway, make that a quarter-way decent at (trying to) copying Toyota.


7milesout
 

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So, IMO, I don't think it's a strategy that they use to try to get a person to go to the dealer, they just expect that's the case (same as theirs) that it will be taken to the dealer always.
Interesting comment, and I appreciate your insight.

I am reminded that many U.S. motorcycle and scooter customers seem to forget that the products we get over here are generally not designed for our tiny market. They are designed for the much larger markets in East Asia and Europe, and we get the few products that the manufacturers believe are worth the trouble and incremental expense to homologate for the U.S. market. Given the miniscule number of Burgmans that are sold here, I feel fortunate that they bother offering them here at all.
 
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