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Discussion Starter #1
Despite the opinion of my Burgman 650 hero, LeDude, who says that cleaning the CVT filter takes "20-40 minutes" and is "Easy," it is neither of those things. Did it for the first time this week and it was (for me, at least) far more consuming in terms of time, effort and frustration. :eek:

I've removed the right leg cover before, so I know the drill, but it's time to consuming to get off and get back on with all the screws, bolts, plastic rivets and tabs just trying to going into the wrong place. Removing the cover off the CVT filter was a major pain, because there are four 8 mm bolts, one of which is hidden behind a wiring harness and two more of which are placed to be as difficult to remove as possible. Once the cover was off, it was easy to remove the filter, inspect and blow some compressed air through it, and reinstall it. This was followed by the process of painfully reassembling everything.

It will definitely go faster next time, but I cannot see it ever taking only "20-40 minutes," at least for someone as mechanically challenged as I am. And it will be never be "Easy." It took at least four times as long to do as changing the oil and filter, which I think is "Easy."

OK, bitching session over. Still really enjoy my "Rosie." :)
 

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Did you have Jazz24 playing softly in the back ground ?
The first time is always the hardest ....
 

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that top right bolt is so much fun !
 
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Discussion Starter #6

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Discussion Starter #7
You are meant to do it with your eyes open and use both hands :D
NOW you tell me. Those were not included in LeDude's list of tools required for the job.
 

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How does getting the side plastics off compare to the 400? With the help of Mitch's videos I can do that pretty quick now on the 400.

Speaking of the CVT filter, I was in mine yesterday changing the sliders and also cleaned the filter (which I assume is the same on the 650 and 400). When I first took mine apart the metal was facing out so I just always put it back that way. Until yesterday when I realized that didn't make sense and the metal part should be on the inside to keep the foam from sucking into the fan. D'oh!
 
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Discussion Starter #9
How does getting the side plastics off compare to the 400? With the help of Mitch's videos I can do that pretty quick now on the 400.
I never removed the side plastics from my 400 so I cannot give you a comparison.
 

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IMO, the 650 is more PITA to work on than the 400 ...emphasis IMO.
 

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I clean mine every time I change the oil. Cooling air flow to the belt is important for long belt life. A clogged filter inhibits that air flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I clean mine every time I change the oil. Cooling air flow to the belt is important for long belt life. A clogged filter inhibits that air flow.
That would be the conservative and correct interval. However, this is my fourth oil change (16,500 miles) since I bought the bike at 5,000 miles (I don't know how many times the original owner changed it) and this is the first time I've gone after the CVT filter. There was barely any dirt in it at all. Based on that, I'll probably clean it only every other change in the future...unless I do a lot of dusty riding.
 

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breaking out my flame suit before I even start typing ...
I haven’t checked my CVT filter yet.... Procrastinating because it’s a PITA for an air filter. So I was thinking....Maybe, just maybe... the tiny bit of debris it captures after thousands and thousands of miles, could be less of a life extension to the CVT than the added heat wear to the CVT through all those Thousands of miles with less cooling flow, because of, the very filter restriction. From photos i’ve seen, the captured debris, is minor, and would most likely pass right through and out, without causing damage. I just talked myself into it. 😉 When I do go to that filter, I will likely remove it. I plan to keep the bike and will post of any CVT longevity issues. I’m guessing it might actually live longer, due to increased cooling during the majority of riding.
Ok done. Flame suit on.
 

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How much good it does depends on what conditions you ride in. Just riding on mostly clean paved roads the filter is probably not doing much. But in that case it would take a very long time to get clogged up so it wouldn't be restricting airflow. Don't know where it draws the air from on the 650; on the 400 it draws from somewhere up under the seat so it's not getting a lot of dirt and bugs anyway.
 

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Even a new filter will block alot of flow in this low pressure application. Hold a clean, new filter out your car window, while you cruise. I think you’ll be surprised how much it pushes back against your grip, and how resistant they are to low pressures flowing through them.
 

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The CVT filter on the 650 draws it's air through a vent located on the right hand side just below the nose of the seat.
 

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In the green box is the air intake for the CVT filter.

20190924_144255.jpg
 
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breaking out my flame suit before I even start typing ...
I haven’t checked my CVT filter yet.... Procrastinating because it’s a PITA for an air filter. So I was thinking....Maybe, just maybe... the tiny bit of debris it captures after thousands and thousands of miles, could be less of a life extension to the CVT than the added heat wear to the CVT through all those Thousands of miles with less cooling flow, because of, the very filter restriction. From photos i’ve seen, the captured debris, is minor, and would most likely pass right through and out, without causing damage. I just talked myself into it. 😉 When I do go to that filter, I will likely remove it. I plan to keep the bike and will post of any CVT longevity issues. I’m guessing it might actually live longer, due to increased cooling during the majority of riding.
Ok done. Flame suit on.
agreed it isn't in a high dirt area and the airflow in is in a low dirt area, but it might stop a bug from crawling in when it's parked.
 

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Suzuki could have designed the air intake vent by the right foot pop out and a slide in filter. Real simple to design in. Or move it up to the vent at the nose of the seat, see red arrow. I also added where the battery is so you could see how it could be vented.

CVT filter intake vent.jpg
 
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