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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was thinking of putting this in the "How To" section but then there is enough difference in the panels between the pre-2013 and the 2013-current versions that this is the better place. This is for the 2013+ models of the Burgman 650.

I finally decided it was past time to check and clean or replace the CVT filter on my Burgman 650 ABS. It has not been done since I bought it with 3301 miles on the odometer and it now has 21671 miles. It is a simple enough process to do so really don't know why I didn't do it before. I have no excuse. There is just enough of a level of difficulty that I figured there should be a write up on it for those who hesitate to do this. It's really not that hard. Though there are a few clips/hooks in the right rear lower footboard panel that just take a bit of, say, persuading to release.

So here we go.
Start with removing the right rear footboard mat.
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Then remove only those screws shown here.
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Next remove the plastic rivet shown here at the rear point of the panel.
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There are several "hooks" connecting the front top and bottom edges of this panel and those are what need extra persuasion to un-clip... carefully. This picture shows the slots where they are located on the panel. I put my hand in there to make it easier to see some of them.
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This exposes the CVT filter cover.
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Remove the 2 screws that hold the upper cover to the lower CVT filter cover. The service manual shows the upper cover totally out of the pictures but if all you're doing is checking or replacing the filter the upper cover only needs to be pushed up out of the way to get to the 4 bolts that hold the lower filter cover to the CVT. I show an 8mm wrench on one of those bolts. I sometimes will use this wrench rather than a ratchet socket since it's easier for me to fit it in places that are hard for the socket extension to get into. Here you can see the rear lower and upper bolts. The front lower bolt is just above the exhaust O2 sensor and the front upper bolt is behind the upper CVT filter cover, which is why it has to be pushed up and back to get it out of the way to get to that bolt.
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After removing the 4 bolts, and then the lower CVT filter cover, remove the 2 bolts that hold the filter in place. This is actually after I already cleaned the filter. The SM says to use compressed air blowing from the inside (frame side) of the filter. I did that but there was very short bits of what looked like straw and some fuzz stuck on that I had to combine using compressed air and my fingers to get that stuff off. The filter element looked fine to me this time but I may replace the filter next time I do this.
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This is what it looks like behind the filter if you've never had it off. The CVT cooling fins are just inside those open slots. This is the driven pulley (rear pulley) of the CVT so if the CVT belt has broken this is what will NOT be spinning if the engine output shaft is spinning.
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With the clean filter put back in place and the 2 filter bolts tightened appropriately reinstall the lower cover using the 4 cover bolts. I highly recommend to start with the front upper bolt since that is the most difficult to lineup due to being behind the upper cover and having to push the upper cover out of the way and also be somewhat of a contortionist to get it back in place. Then insert all the rest of the bolts in any order and tighten all as required.
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The last bits are to reinstall the right lower footboard panel and right rear footboard mat. Line up the hooks and bolt tabs of the right lower footboard as it is pushed back into place. I simply started to insert the bolt tabs into the footboard and the front hooks snapped into place. I did push a little on the front part of the panel to ensure the hooks snapped in all the way. Then I made sure to reset the plastic rivet and reinserted it at the rear point of the right footboard panel.
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After that reinstall the 3 screws into the footboard that hold the right lower footboard panel and then reinstall the right footboard mat and I'm done.
 

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That is so much easier than the 2002-2012 650.

In my area I seldom ever ride in dusty conditions. When I last took my filter out it had 25,000 miles on it and was clean.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Funny thing... I couldn't find any broken tabs or plastic bits. I think they were already gone before.

@Dave_J , I very vaguely recall checking the filter on my 2005 Burgman 650 but I really don't remember what I had to do to get to it. I just thought I'd better check it before this next riding season gets too far along.
 
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I might leave mine out next time (GASP).

I think just a fine mesh stainless steel screen should work up here in the Great NorthWet.

The one I removed from my 2nd 2008 with just 305 miles was a little dirty. The engine air filter was dirty too and had a lot of cherry pits from a rodent. The first owner was a large cherry orchard on the dry side of the state, very dusty.
 

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Silly me, I took the 3 piece lower panels off like the owners manual shows to do. Ended up breaking the forward most tab near the radiator, and wrestled with the plastic push pin near the exhaust as it wouldn’t release. One and done.
 

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Before
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Ppl

After. Full cooling air flow now…
And yes, I’m banking on maximizing cooling with some dirt, being as good or better, than restricted clean air.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Silly me, I took the 3 piece lower panels off like the owners manual shows to do. Ended up breaking the forward most tab near the radiator, and wrestled with the plastic push pin near the exhaust as it wouldn’t release. One and done.
You must have a different service manual than I do. My SM states only to remove the footboard panel that I removed and not more than that. I've had the entire set of lower panels off before but didn't need to do that for this task.
 

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You must have a different service manual than I do. My SM states only to remove the footboard panel that I removed and not more than that. I've had the entire set of lower panels off before but didn't need to do that for this task.
my manual part# ends with “-03A” December 2012. I’m guessing yours is newer
 

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My 120 HP snowmobile used to explode like a shotgun, $90 belts way too often. Someone suggested they alleviated a similar issue on the same sled model by removing the plastic belt cover and foam sounds insulation, leaving just the perforated steel explosion cage. As soon as I made that change letting more cooling air on the CVT, my CVT belt life more than doubled. Heat kills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
my manual part# ends with “-03A” December 2012. I’m guessing yours is newer
Yes, my SM part # ends with -03E and the inside back cover showing the same part # as the front cover shows August 2017 and is for the model years 2013-2018 only.
 

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I can’t see it from online diagrams: where is the warmed CVT cooling air exhaust hole located? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can’t see it from online diagrams: where is the warmed CVT cooling air exhaust hole located? Just curious.
Looking closer at the CVT case breakout diagram there is a ribbed channel (ribbed on the outside) that curves over the top of the driven pulley just above the inlet filter port. Per what I see cooling air enters through the filter port and due to the inner ribbing of the casing moves around that driven pulley then under and around the driving (front) pulley then up to the electric CVT motor gears (the motor itself is outside the CVT case but the gearing is inside above the driving pulley) at the top front and finally out through that exhaust channel over the top toward the rear of the CVT case.

Here is a photo of the inside half of the CVT case with the pulleys and gears installed that I think shows this clearly. The output channel for cooling air starts at the white nylon gear set and curves to the rear. You can see that channel is open to the rear toward the rear tire. When you have the right footboard lower panel removed you can look up behind the footboard and see this opening at the back of the CVT. You can see the opening also in both of your photos above the filter port as well as the photo in my first post here with the filter removed (exit opening is in the upper left corner of that photo).
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My 120 HP snowmobile used to explode like a shotgun, $90 belts way too often. Someone suggested they alleviated a similar issue on the same sled model by removing the plastic belt cover and foam sounds insulation, leaving just the perforated steel explosion cage. As soon as I made that change letting more cooling air on the CVT, my CVT belt life more than doubled. Heat kills.
Now I'm just wondering, why would a snowmobile ever need any sort of filter except fuel and oil with dust presumably completely absent?
 

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Looking closer at the CVT case breakout diagram there is a ribbed channel (ribbed on the outside) that curves over the top of the driven pulley just above the inlet filter port. Per what I see cooling air enters through the filter port and due to the inner ribbing of the casing moves around that driven pulley then under and around the driving (front) pulley then up to the electric CVT motor gears (the motor itself is outside the CVT case but the gearing is inside above the driving pulley) at the top front and finally out through that exhaust channel over the top toward the rear of the CVT case.

Here is a photo of the inside half of the CVT case with the pulleys and gears installed that I think shows this clearly. The output channel for cooling air starts at the white nylon gear set and curves to the rear. You can see that channel is open to the rear toward the rear tire. When you have the right footboard lower panel removed you can look up behind the footboard and see this opening at the back of the CVT. You can see the opening also in both of your photos above the filter port as well as the photo in my first post here with the filter removed (exit opening is in the upper left corner of that photo).
View attachment 93585
Perfect. I see it now 👍🏻
 

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Now I'm just wondering, why would a snowmobile ever need any sort of filter except fuel and oil with dust presumably completely absent?
It’s not a filter. Even the engine, draws unfiltered air. It’s for sound deadening. The one drawback to running without it, is the CVT noise is very noticeable while riding.
 

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Air flow.

CVT Fan.jpg

Naked 650 CVT Filter.jpg
 
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If I hadn’t already decided to do away with the filter altogether, I think I would have looked into Making a custom side filter where that plastic snorkel fits to the exterior moulded louvers.
access would be a breeze- NPI. Surprised Suzuki didn’t do it.
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I don't think I saw you mention the two plastic tabs at the top of the second filter cover the first one has to fit in. Oh and if the foam part is in good shape you can clean it. I used my house vacuum with the soft brush to suck out the hair or other stuff. It's a bit safer than using 90 psi shop air.
 
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