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I’ve been intrigued by this type of roofed scooter ever since I saw BMW’s version years ago . Today I stumbled on this review on you-tube , then did a search on a national Craigslist and found several for sale , one close by . See ad at bottom of page . I’m not big on a 150 ,......but it might be a fun toy ?


This is a review from an owner who put 20,000 miles on one ..............
A CHINESE SCOOTER 20,000 miles ? .......... WHO KNEW?
I wonder if HE KNEW (or knows) the speedo / odo on his threewheeler is displaying kilometres and not miles? 20,000km is only around 12,500 miles. ;)
 

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The reality is that all the Chinese bikes are clones of Japanese models. The GY series of engines are all Suzuki GS125 clones at the end of the day.

I wouldn't criticise them too much, however. In my experience the quality is pretty good overall, although with a few disappointing weaknesses (mainly plastics and rubber parts). I bought a new Haobon 125 in China 5 years back and rode 5,000 miles around China on it in a month. Given the oft absymal road and traffic conditions I was extremely impressed at being able to travel on average 300 miles per day, at an average speed of 25mph and 100mpg.
 

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'not sure I agree Elliott.

Firstly, it gets a lot hotter than 85F in China - ever tried to crosss the Gobi Desert in mid-summer, makes Death Valley feel like it's in the shade ;)

The concern I had with the plastics was the thickness and brittleness. Unlike The Japanese ABS plastics, which are quite flexible, the Chinese manufacturers seem to predominantly use a hard brittle plastic which does not flex easily and withstand vibration well - note this is NOT a criticism of the quality of the plastic, but a comment on the TYPE of plastic, used.

As for mechanics refusing to work on Chinese bikes, I would suggest these mechanics are descendants of the same troglodytes who refused to work on Japanese bikes in the late '60s due to their "ricepaper construction standards" - probably the same people who still call "duct tape" duck tape, even though the original manufacturer renamed it 60+ years ago. ;)
 
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