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You could go back and make them do what you asked for, did you pay for the 90° stems? I did on my Suzuki Bandit and like you, got home and noticed they installed shorty rubber stems. They did not want to do it (obviously) and promised me they would do it free next go around. Next go around never came, I sold the bike and bought a Connie 1400, same thing happened again, same dealer. This time I made them write it on the receipt that it's free next time and give me the 90° stems I paid for, they did. I tossed them in my pile of bike stuff and forgot about it again. Seems like an evil up charging trick to me, or dealership stupidity.

We can take this in an entirely different direction. SOOO, what kind of tire did you get? :)
 

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My next go around and it's time now, I'm going to speak with the Service Manager and ask to have my tires installed for FREE if they screw up again, I will be pissed for 6k-7k miles otherwise, I check air pressure almost every time I ride, certainly every week. Thats many uncomfortable contortionist psi check reminders in 6k-7k miles.
 

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If you get no positive response, you may be able to swap them out yourself without removing from the bike if you have a good capacity compressor and some C-clamps?
 

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Me too….. I have a carpet remnant just for my knees. I also put a grease pencil mark on the tire to know when the valve stem is in the sweet spot for filling.
Love all the good info. here. Going out now to mark the sweet spot. (y)
Just a short sunrise ride tomorrow, hope to see a nice sunrise on the Northend of Tampa Bay.
 

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How the hell do you do anything with these valve stems?! I asked for 90degree stems, but they didn't do it, these are even longer than the originals! I can't get my tire gauge in there!
View attachment 99337

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I'm frustrated as well, my 90° are delivering today after reading your post which reminds me of my frustration. Lots of great suggestions in this thread (I have them all) I won't say what I don't like, but most sits on the shelf unused for one reason or another. I'll tell you what I do like until my 90° arrive.

I use two hands, one squeezed between the disc applying downward pressure on the tire pressure gauge with hose to the valve stem. I use a standard air hose with a swivel and angled chuck on it. Sometimes it helps to carefully route the hose from the opposite side or through the disk to make solid contact and avoid letting more air out than going in.

I really like the tire gauge with the hose as G-Dub mentioned above. Make sure you get one with a hose that swivels if you choose to go this route. I have purchased every type of gauge available; this is my favorite due to maneuverability and the needle function I prefer over the digital, I like stuff that works, not fancy. This I also calibrate at 40PSI because most of my vehicles, bikes fall between 40-50psi. I have it dialed in dead-nuts at 40psi.
My most expensive gauges and digital are always found inaccurate when I test them against a known calibrated crystal standard and nitrogen. I don't calibrate to full range, simply the single point I use most.

I like this gauge, it just works and it's inexpensive, paired with a set of 90° valve stems you should be good to go.
Lots of other options, I feel this works best or me.
www.cyclegear.com

Stockton Tire Air Pressure Gauge With Hose - Cycle Gear
Having the correct tire pressure helps prolong tire life and maximizes performance. Check it with ease with this gauge from Stockton Tool Company.
www.cyclegear.com
www.cyclegear.com
 

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I calibrate mine with a calibrated indicator on a manifold, not full span of the gage, but just at 40psi as a test point. I find that the closest to all my tire needs. I have 5 tire gages and every single one of them reads different. The type you have is my choice as it is adjustable by removing the needle for calibration. You just need a known standard.

That type is also extremely delicate. A drop to the floor or a bump and they easily are inaccurate.
 

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My retirement gig...manage a calibration lab.
You need a standard. This would be an indicator with a Certificate of Calibration stating it's values. This standard is what you would compare your reading with and or adjust the test gage.
 
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