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Ouch ! I know your pain with the stock valves. I have an old fashioned pencil stick gauge and a stubby digital gauge but my biggest problem is the flip lever air fill hose. Watching this thread for wisdom from the elders.
 

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You could go back and make them do what you asked for, did you pay for the 90° stems? I did on my Suzuki Bandit and like you, got home and noticed they installed shorty rubber stems. They did not want to do it (obviously) and promised me they would do it free next go around. Next go around never came, I sold the bike and bought a Connie 1400, same thing happened again, same dealer. This time I made them write it on the receipt that it's free next time and give me the 90° stems I paid for, they did. I tossed them in my pile of bike stuff and forgot about it again. Seems like an evil up charging trick to me, or dealership stupidity.

We can take this in an entirely different direction. SOOO, what kind of tire did you get? :)
 

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My next go around and it's time now, I'm going to speak with the Service Manager and ask to have my tires installed for FREE if they screw up again, I will be pissed for 6k-7k miles otherwise, I check air pressure almost every time I ride, certainly every week. Thats many uncomfortable contortionist psi check reminders in 6k-7k miles.
 

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Maybe I'll ride over there and ask the service guy to check my tires, then show him the text where I asked for 90 degree stems.
Can you manage to get this sort of thing on?


(I searched Amazon for Schrader valve extension, which results in a lot of similar products. I prefer the screw-on kind, vs. the clip-on kind; the latter takes more room, and is not as reliable, IMO.)

If so, you can check and add air that way. When I had a couple of baggers -- particularly my Victory Cross Country Tour, with its massive hard saddlebags -- I kept a 10" version of that sort of device in one saddlebag, expressly for checking the rear tire (because the saddlebag in the way made getting anything but a hand in there very difficult).

If you can't even get an extension like that on, I would have the tire remounted, with a proper sideways valve, or you're SOL. See this thread:

 

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If you get no positive response, you may be able to swap them out yourself without removing from the bike if you have a good capacity compressor and some C-clamps?
 

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Me too….. I have a carpet remnant just for my knees. I also put a grease pencil mark on the tire to know when the valve stem is in the sweet spot for filling.
Love all the good info. here. Going out now to mark the sweet spot. (y)
Just a short sunrise ride tomorrow, hope to see a nice sunrise on the Northend of Tampa Bay.
 

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2012 Burgman 400
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

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I have one of those, hate the **** thing. I'll try to get all the clips that get in the way and see if I can use it, but still don't have a pressure gauge to get in there...

Was looking at this...
Digital Tire Inflator

Give some thought on this…. try it for 29 days.

 

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1) Adjustable (!) Air Chuck:

This is another possibility, one that I forgot I had on my shelf:
Tool Electric blue Bicycle part Office supplies Font


I think I got this around the time I got my Victory bagger, but I haven't used it much since (probably because I found the extension hose even more convenient). Regardless, this thing works as advertised, and the angle is adjustable (in fact, I had to loosen the bolt you see in that picture, in order to get it to turn to the angle I wanted. In any case, a quality product, like most things from Motion Pro, and it may help out.

2) TPMS, But Not In This Case:

I have a FOBO TPMS on my (for sale) 650 Exec, and like it a lot. I just stand next to the scoot pretty much before I leave the garage, do a couple of clicks on my phone, and see the pressure in each tire. Very handy as a pre-ride check. Some brands of TPMS require the wheels to start rotating some number of turns, to wake up the system, before giving a current pressure reading, but this is NOT the case with the FOBO. I'd say that TPMS may be a case where you get what you pay for.

Additionally, I have the FOBO T-valve stems installed. (FOBO doesn't seem to list them on their web site anymore, but you can still see them at WingStuff and some other sites, e.g., wingstuff.com/products/37222-t-valve-optional-accessory-for-fobo-2-tpms ). These allow you to add (or subtract) air without removing the TPMS sensors. Also very handy.

BUT ...

But you should never add TPMS sensors to rubber valve stems. The extra torque of the extra mass may cause the stem to fail. Several TPMS vendors specifically note this caveat in descriptions of their products. (I wrote an article on one TPMS system -- no longer sold for bikes -- for webBikeWorld some years back, so I have researched this particular aspect). Thus, sensors should be added only to metal valve stems, and this is not the case with the OP's new stems.

ALSO ...

Also, if you were to replace those valve stems with straight metal ones, you have to ensure that there is clearance for the sensors. This may be an issue with respect to brake calipers, or anything else in there. I am not familiar with the rims, calipers, etc., on a 400 Burgie, so that is something to be checked out. (For instance, there is not sufficient clearance for sensors on my new BMW 400, which is a shame, IMO.)

So: there might be clearance issues with the current stems vis-a-vis TPMS sensors, and you would not want to add them to rubber stems, anyway.

That's all I got (for now).
 

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How the hell do you do anything with these valve stems?! I asked for 90degree stems, but they didn't do it, these are even longer than the originals! I can't get my tire gauge in there!
View attachment 99337

View attachment 99339
I'm frustrated as well, my 90° are delivering today after reading your post which reminds me of my frustration. Lots of great suggestions in this thread (I have them all) I won't say what I don't like, but most sits on the shelf unused for one reason or another. I'll tell you what I do like until my 90° arrive.

I use two hands, one squeezed between the disc applying downward pressure on the tire pressure gauge with hose to the valve stem. I use a standard air hose with a swivel and angled chuck on it. Sometimes it helps to carefully route the hose from the opposite side or through the disk to make solid contact and avoid letting more air out than going in.

I really like the tire gauge with the hose as G-Dub mentioned above. Make sure you get one with a hose that swivels if you choose to go this route. I have purchased every type of gauge available; this is my favorite due to maneuverability and the needle function I prefer over the digital, I like stuff that works, not fancy. This I also calibrate at 40PSI because most of my vehicles, bikes fall between 40-50psi. I have it dialed in dead-nuts at 40psi.
My most expensive gauges and digital are always found inaccurate when I test them against a known calibrated crystal standard and nitrogen. I don't calibrate to full range, simply the single point I use most.

I like this gauge, it just works and it's inexpensive, paired with a set of 90° valve stems you should be good to go.
Lots of other options, I feel this works best or me.
www.cyclegear.com

Stockton Tire Air Pressure Gauge With Hose - Cycle Gear
Having the correct tire pressure helps prolong tire life and maximizes performance. Check it with ease with this gauge from Stockton Tool Company.
www.cyclegear.com
www.cyclegear.com
 

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