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Discussion Starter #1
This has probably been answered - but I'll throw it out.

My shop is good - but pricey. And I'm out of work.

And my 650 needs an oil change.

The previous owner gave me his shop manual, along with the machine...well and good. But although I can get the crankcase drained (a no-brainer) and even the transmission drain, I cannot get to the transmission FILL plug until I peel off all the tupperware!

The manual doesn't address this - their photo shows the side stripped down, that's all.

The CHASSIS section shows the tupperware exploded; but it looks like i have to remove all the front end before I get the lower side strips off.

Is that true?

Meantime...it was time; and it was halfway through the job I found this problem. So I just said the **** with it, put fresh oil in the crankcase. Didn't change the filter because I'm gonna have to do it over again soon anyway, once I learn how to do it right.

I just wanted fresh oil in there...it was way past due and I'm looking and maybe a fall trip.

Input or shortcuts?
 

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Don't fill it through the fill hole. Fill it through the overflow hole. You can reach that without removing any body work. I use one of the old style pump oil cans with a piece of 1/4 inch tubing added to the end. Fill the oil can with oil. Stick the tubing through the overflow hole. Pump the trigger until oil runs back out the overflow hole.

The oil can I use looks like this. I bought it at Wal-Mart.



Other folks have used turkey basters and other devices to do the same thing.
 

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I'd forgotten about LeDude's site.

He makes it sound easy! (haven't gotten the video yet; doing something else on the computer).

I hope it does go smoothly - I know from my Chinese B400 clone, how easy the tupperware is to break when you're not careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Don't fill it through the fill hole. Fill it through the overflow hole. You can reach that without removing any body work. I use one of the old style pump oil cans with a piece of 1/4 inch tubing added to the end. Fill the oil can with oil. Stick the tubing through the overflow hole. Pump the trigger until oil runs back out the overflow hole.

The oil can I use looks like this. I bought it at Wal-Mart.



Other folks have used turkey basters and other devices to do the same thing.
That's brilliant.

Seriously. I did consider filling through the drain hole, but that seemed too messy and too easy to overfill.

I was getting so mad looking to get at the fill hole, I didn't look for the oil-level hole. Is that outside the plastic skin?
 

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I've never taken the plastic off either of my 650's to change transmission oil. I've never seen the fill tube for the transmission in a total of 42,000 miles. I fill the tranny thru the oil level hole, very simple and quick.
 

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When you get right down to it removing the tupperware is not really a big deal. It's more a matter of getting over the unknown about doing it than about actually doing it. I've had all the body work off mine so many times now it's second nature to do it. I'll take off body work just because it makes reaching something easier than doing it with the bodywork in place.
 

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Agree 100% with Buffalo. My 650 is 9+ years old now and the tupperware doesn't show any indication of becoming age-embrittled, which was my only concern (snapping brittle tabs off, etc.).

BTW, my 45-year-old Craftsman phillips-head screwdriver (#2?) makes a perfectly snug fit in the plastic snap fittings, couldn't be any easier to push the lock pin out of the bottom and then pull up, withdrawing the snap body. What luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When you get right down to it removing the tupperware is not really a big deal. It's more a matter of getting over the unknown about doing it than about actually doing it. I've had all the body work off mine so many times now it's second nature to do it. I'll take off body work just because it makes reaching something easier than doing it with the bodywork in place.
You're probably right.

BUT...my Chinese clone, I had to strip down. I'd already hit a deer with it; the plastic was seriously damaged. But I had to get to the engine pronto.

It was an unholy mess. Still is...I'm going to strip it down and run the skeleton; but I don't want to damage any more than was in the hit.

But I did break some.

That's with a piece of junk that's a total write-off...the Burgman 650 is the opposite. It's the best bike I've ever owned; and I do NOT want to vandalize it.
 

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When you get right down to it removing the tupperware is not really a big deal. It's more a matter of getting over the unknown about doing it than about actually doing it. I've had all the body work off mine so many times now it's second nature to do it. I'll take off body work just because it makes reaching something easier than doing it with the bodywork in place.
Exactly.
It's a little inconvenient to have to remove the tupperware but it's not really that difficult. As much mind over matter as anything else. Feel the fear and do it anyway (good book). A PK and flat head screwdriver to remove several screws and deal with the push-pin fasteners, and it's pretty simple. Work through it methodically and take your time.

I just did all the fluids in the last week on my K7 and had the engine/hump cover off and also took off the left lower floor-board tupperware same as in the pic above

It isn't needed, but removing them just make the job that much easier. Also allows one to see and make sense of anything that might need ones attention. Like I found one of the overflow/breather tubes needed re-routing. Not a major, but easily done.
 

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You're probably right.
BUT...my Chinese clone, I had to strip down. I'd already hit a deer with it; the plastic was seriously damaged. But I had to get to the engine pronto.
It was an unholy mess. Still is...I'm going to strip it down and run the skeleton; but I don't want to damage any more than was in the hit.
But I did break some.
That's with a piece of junk that's a total write-off...the Burgman 650 is the opposite. It's the best bike I've ever owned; and I do NOT want to vandalize it.
I've seen you mention your Chinese made B400 clone in several threads. I'd be interested to see some pics and learn more about the make/model, as I'm working over here in PRC for the past 11 years, and cannot say I have seen anything of that nature here. Mind you there are two markets, the local market which get a lot less range and less in terms or quality too, and then everything else manufactured for the export market.
 

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JPT , you have to learn to take your time and RELAX with it . LaDude has just about every thing you might want to tackle on you-tube . Take it one step at a time and think about what you are doing , if you get lost just stop and watch the video again . Then if you still get stumped , ask here and some one will talk you through it . When I work on the plastics I like to look at the pictures in the parts fiche , it shows me where every screw , nut or bolt goes .

Take your time . TheReaper!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've seen you mention your Chinese made B400 clone in several threads. I'd be interested to see some pics and learn more about the make/model, as I'm working over here in PRC for the past 11 years, and cannot say I have seen anything of that nature here. Mind you there are two markets, the local market which get a lot less range and less in terms or quality too, and then everything else manufactured for the export market.
It's a Xingyue XY300t-4; that's the upgraded, FI version of what used to be sold in the States as a VOG 260. In terms of operation, it was top-notch. It looked just like and felt just like a Burgman 400, which I had years ago. Fuel economy was outstanding.

Too bad the cam chain slipped and the engine self-destructed at 2500 miles.

Too too bad the factory reps had ZERO interest in making good on the warranty. It was in the shop for TEN MONTHS.

It really is too bad. The old VOG sold reasonably well for a Chinese scoot; but the better, upgraded model isn't selling at ALL. Once burned, twice shy.

I have photos someplace but can't locate them; I'm changing computers, going from Windows to Mac...so things are disorganized. If I find it, I'll post them here or on a new thread and send you an IM.

But take my word for it: Looks just like a 2003 Burgman 400
 

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Being out in the desert plastic & heat just don't like to mix. Always seem to break push pins on my 400 & my 650 is no different. Lost the rear panel because of the push pin problem. I have extras, but I do cringe every time I have to remove any kind of plastic. :shaking:
 

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I just changed the oil and filter and the rear end oil....but appears I am suppose to change transmission oil also at 600 miles? I thought the motor oil was also for the transmission? Is their a separate oil there? It looks like it says to use the same oil in the transmission replacement as motor?
 

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The engine and clutch share oil. The transmission has it's own oil supply that you have to change. And yes you do use the same grade of motor oil in it that you use in the engine.

Go back to the top of this thread and read through it. You will see pictures of where the overflow plug is and how to fill it through that plug.

The drain plug is on the bottom rear of the engine near the center line of the crank case. It is a unique shaped plug. The head looks something like a small chrome doughnut. A 8 mm hex bit fits into the hole in the center to remove it. You should get around a pint of oil out of it.
 
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