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Discussion Starter #1
Probably the wrong forum to ask this question, but.... can you use an O-ring or
X-chain on a motorcycle that has if you will a stock "standard" (cheap-o) chain?

Bill.....
 

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Sure. I never put a cheapo chain on any of my bikes that use a chain. But remember to change your sprockets too. Worn sprockets will kill a new chain in no time flat as I found out years ago.

The only way that I would ever put a cheapo chain on a bike ever again was if I was soon going to sell it or trade it it. Most everyone that has been riding as long as I have knows how much fun it is to have to push your bike home due to it breaking its chain. That's one reason that I only have one chain drive bike anymore and I dont ride it much.
 

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Sure. I never put a cheapo chain on any of my bikes that use a chain. But remember to change your sprockets too. Worn sprockets will kill a new chain in no time flat as I found out years ago.

The only way that I would ever put a cheapo chain on a bike ever again was if I was soon going to sell it or trade it it. Most everyone that has been riding as long as I have knows how much fun it is to have to push your bike home due to it breaking its chain. That's one reason that I only have one chain drive bike anymore and I dont ride it much.
For selling a bike, I would either replace with a good chain or leave the old chain on and tell the buyer that they need to replace the chain before I would put a cheap chain on the bike. Putting a cheap chain on tells the buyer that you cut corners and if I was the buyer I wouldn't buy a bike that shows the prior owner didn't maintain the bike well.

Just my thoughts on this matter.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #4
PS I'm not buying or selling. Just thinking about possibly buying a motorcycle with a chain (ugh) and not looking forward to chain maintenance. Am told that with o-ring or x-chains cleaning and oiling maintenance is not required as often???? Still can't figure why mfgrs don't use belts rather than chains.

Bill...
 

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PS I'm not buying or selling. Just thinking about possibly buying a motorcycle with a chain (ugh) and not looking forward to chain maintenance. Am told that with o-ring or x-chains cleaning and oiling maintenance is not required as often???? Still can't figure why mfgrs don't use belts rather than chains.

Bill...
Current belt technology can't handle the horsepower of more powerful bikes. Belt strength is directly proportional to width, so a belt that's capable of handling big HP number would have to really wide, meaning you'd have to deal with big offsets and large front and rear pulleys. Belts also don't deal well with gravel or dirt, and you have to drop the swing-arm completely to change a belt (although you have to do it less often than a chain).

Modern o-ring and x-ring chains actually require very little maintenance. The lube for the chain is held inside the o-rings, so the goal of maintaining the chain is to prevent situations that can damage the o-rings or displace the lubricant. Preventing rust, removing grit, and keeping the o-rings plumped up are all that's required. For that, all you really need is a cloth with a bit of ATF on it to give the chain a quick wipe-down every 600 miles or so. I don't recommend WD-40, as it can actually penetrate the o-rings and dilute the lubricant.

Most anti-chain people either have unrealistic expectations of maintenance, or remember when you had to do intensive maintenance on non o-ring chains. I've been riding long enough to remember when you owned two chains: one that was on the bike; and one that you cleaned, soaked in paraffin, and hung on a nail in your garage. You rotated them every 500 miles or so, and cleaning involved kerosine and a wall-paper pasting tray. Of course, we all ran clip-type chains so they were easy to swap.

FYI, BMW does make a sport-touring bike with a belt drive; the F800GT comes with a parallel twin and belt drive. It's a fun little bike (I test rode one last year), but you have to be willing to deal with BMW's 'premium price'.
 
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