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I have been using manual clutch all my life until recently switch to Suzuki Bergman. Someone just told me, at dead stop, I need to twist it up to 4000+ rpm as soon as I can or I will glaze the clutch. i.e. don't baby it and go slow to get it up to speed.

Please tell me what is the right way to use this kind of twist and go system correctly. Don't want to ruin this beautiful machine because of my lack of understanding.

Also, I used to grab the clutch, twist the gas to raise up the rpm then down shift in order to drop gear quickly and smoothly. Now I can't do that. How else can you control the speed when you are coming down fast to the corner and need to downshift to help reduce your speed other than using your brakes solely?

Thank you in advance for your input.

Eric
 

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it is a compromise between accelerating hard to engage the clutch (at about 25 mph), and conserving gas and mechanical components (such as the $160 drive belt....)

Take off firmly, to about 25 and you will feel the clutch grab. Then you can ease off to save gas. You will still out-accelerate most cars out there.

Don't let the clutch drag, by loafing around at slow speeds, thus causing the shoes to wear.

This bike doesn't have engine braking like transmission bikes do. Also, it isn't a GSXR so you probably won't be "coming down fast to corners" :D
 

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Parapilot927 said:
Someone just told me, at dead stop, I need to twist it up to 4000+ rpm as soon as I can or I will glaze the clutch. i.e. don't baby it and go slow to get it up to speed.
I do not think this is true. The clutch is designed to operate correctly at low speeds.

Parapilot927 said:
Please tell me what is the right way to use this kind of twist and go system correctly.
The beauty of automatic clutch is that you can forget about its existance. The only exception is when climbing a steep hill - you do not want to do it while slipping the clutch.
 

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I don't believe that accelerating to a particular speed is the answer either, so I'm with FizyK.

It is the revs that matter not the speed and it isn't a linear relationship. The clutch locks up at a higher rpm than it releases at.
Bring the bike briskly up to around 3750 rpm and if you have any mechanical simpathy you will hear and feel the rpm drop as the clutch begins to lock up and then alter the throttle as required. If you back off the throttle to 12 mph the clutch will remain locked up even though your revs are below the point where the clutched locked up.

You can also be too aggressive when starting which will also cause the clutch to slip (manual or automatic). It is kinder on clutch and belt to feed in the throttle fairly briskly until the clutch fully engages and then open up. It doesn't make you any slower (in fact I find I get cramped by bikes of a similar capacity every time they come off the throttle to change gear :twisted: )

At very low speed such as making a u turn on a narrow road you have to use a different technique to a geared bike. Use constant rpm and slip the clutch by using the brakes to adjust your speed - obviously you won't be wanting to lock the clutch up here, just enough to prevent stalling, similar to a geared bike would be using as the clutch bites.
Engine braking is there but not as strong.
 

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Parapilot927 said:
... I need to twist it up to 4000+ rpm as soon as I can or I will glaze the clutch. i.e. don't baby it and go slow to get it up to speed.... Eric
I'd go along with that advice. :thumbup: Back in 2007-2008, we had a lot of complaints for squealing clutches. One member, Blackbeard, got some advice from his mechanic that I thought was a little strange at first. The mechanic said to blip the throttle to 4000 rpms, then adjust from there once the bike is moving to either slow down or speed up. I thought 4000 rpms was a little high...till I started looking closer at what I was doing. I was doing the same thing as Blackbeard's mechanic was recommending. Till the OEM clutch wore out at 33,500 miles, it never squealed.

Our clutch works on centrifugal force. If the rpms are low, the clutch pads will just slide on the clutch bell. That sliding will build up a lot of heat. If the rpms are high enough, there will be enough centrifugal force to cause them to grip harder on the clutch bell. 4000 rpms is relatively low for this engine and it takes only a second to get there.

IMHO, the reason many of the of the clutches squealed, was the owners followed Suzuki's break-in instructions...and kept following them after the first 500 miles were over. Those instructions had you keeping the rpms below 4000. That's kind of hard to do with a bike with a CVT...which makes me believe the instructions were generic to bikes with a manual transmission, and not designed for the Burgman 400.

Chris
 

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Daboo said:
I was doing the same thing as Blackbeard's mechanic was recommending. Till the OEM clutch wore out at 33,500 miles, it never squealed.
At 40,000 miles I still have the original clutch, no squeals. I do not take any special precautions. If I want to go faster, I throttle up. If I want to go slower, I throttle down. Occasionally brakes. That's it.
 

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Much as the last post, only thing I do is if possible in slow traffic I don't try to
hold a steady slow speed but give it a little burst then let it free wheel as the clutch drops
drive at just below 9 mph, at first coming from a geared bike I noticed a slight delay when
accelerating away after slowing for a corner but don't now brain as programmed my right
hand to open up a little earlier I suppose. as for the running in after the first 100 miles
I did what I usually do and put a mark at about 1/4 throttle and used that up to 500 miles
then went to a 1/3 and so on, never had a bad engine using this method.
Enjoy your new ride.
 

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I also throttle up the K7 3 shoe Burgman then back off. Just this week at 24000+_ on the dial we pulled the CVT cover for the first time. Belt only worn marginally but will change it with the stock rollers. Clutch material not even half worn and no blueing or yellowing of the clutch bell. Bearings are fine and don't need replacing. Must be doing something right! Never have had a chirp or squeal from it since bought new in December '07. Bike had a build date of October'06. Wait time for parts is what is the killer up here in Canada with Suzuki though. While at it I am changing to a irridium plug even though the original Denso has lots of life left!
I use a K&N filter on the bike. Mid gasket on the exhaust was changed to a '08 type as the OEM '07 blew out at 19000. Tires replaced once only with OEM hoops.
Great experience with this scoot.
 
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