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I have seen several references to the low center of gravity on the Burgman 400. Exactly what does that mean and how is it better than say a higher center of gravity that is on another scooter like the Majeaty. Does it make a difference in ride quality?

scootervan
 

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Think of one of those driveway BasketBall hoops. You fill the base with water. If you don't, they tip over easily. Putting the weight (the center of gravity) very low makes for more vertical stability.

The same holds true for vehicles. Keeping the weight low keeps the vehicle from tipping over, or makes it less likely to tip over.

Center of gravity is another name for balance point.
 

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scootervan said:
I have seen several references to the low center of gravity on the Burgman 400. Exactly what does that mean and how is it better than say a higher center of gravity that is on another scooter like the Majeaty. Does it make a difference in ride quality?

scootervan
Here's an example: Take a broom stick and stick it into one of the holes of a bowling ball. Now, holding the broomstick such that the bowling ball is over your head, how easy is it to balance? Not very easy at all! That's because there's a high center of gravity there (center of gravity is where the center point of where gravity has the most effect and right now its up high in the center of the bowling ball).
Now, with that same bowling ball/broomstick, put the bowling ball on the floor with the broomstick facing up. The bowing ball is the motorcycle and the broomstick is you on the motorcycle. Pretty hard to lose your balance with the center of gravity that low, isn't it?
 

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Another way to look at it: given two motorcycles of the same total weight, but one carries it's weight up high and the other down low, the one with the lower center of gravity will be easier to manuever at low speeds, easier to tip up from the side stand, easier to lift in the event of a fall, etc., even though it is the same total weight as the other bike.

Also, with the weight carried lower there is less inertia acting on the bike when changing angle, as in leaning for a turn or going back upright after a turn. So bikes with lower CGs are "quicker" to maneuver, while bikes with higher CGs are "steadier."

BTW, a simple definition of Center of Gravity is "that point at which half the mass is above and half is below." If you were to lay a bike on its side, the CG would be where it would balance like a teeter-totter.

HTH.
 
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keep in mind that the COG of a doughnut is the empty space in it.
In pole vaulting; while going over the bar, the athlete COG is behind his back.
Weight, Speed, shape (Space volume), external factors (such as wind) etc along with gravity, all together determines the COG of anything.
 

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also keep in mind cg changes, for example. mine is substantially higher and more foreward after lunch, but changes little, despite a significant weight change post poop
 
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It's noticeable on the 650. You have to lean it farther over than most bikes in order to start a turn. Leaning into the turn helps.

On the flip side, it means you can lean it over at stops a little more without it feeling too heavy.
 
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